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While I do applaud you for using wireframes to effectively explore different scenarios and test edge cases, I don't think you should be trying to solve this problem in a silo as it is the job of the UX designer to advocate for the user's point of view in various requirements and design considerations as part of a bigger product team. To answer the question, ...


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Yes, sure, figma has this link that answer your question: https://help.figma.com/article/32-developer-handoff Still, if they don't want to change you can talk them about this psd plugins to extract codeviews from images. You could export figma to psd and then make them use one of the plugins. Not recommended, but better than nothing. https://medium.com/@...


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There are a number of requirements I'd make sure I would nail down. I have built UI's almost exactly like this for material inspection and process control. Here are some key CTQs for a UI like this: Absolutely critical that you minimize 'UI friction' like extra clicks and selections, as this is probably an activity that gets done many times per day, and ...


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The trivial answer is "as quick as possible". The user experience research group NNGroup has some relevant information regarding load times. Most relevant to your situation is probably the following. The 3 response-time limits are the same today as when I wrote about them in 1993 (based on 40-year-old research by human factors pioneers): 0.1 ...


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You can apply a screen glare texture on top of your UI in any graphics editor (Photoshop, for example in screen blending mode with levels adjustment of the image) or to make it an overlay image in your website. Example of such texture: Alternatively, you can use screen mirroring software (for example psmirror) to test the UI on the real device during UI ...


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You've got a really nice reference on google forms (mobile and web). I would not recommend at all making a unique long page. Users needs to flow, and if they think the task is gonna be long and boring they could drop off. Here are some tips: 4_Always locate the user on the progress of the survey. Maybe with %, maybe with pagination. 2_If you are gonna ...


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Since users are not required to answer all the questions I would split the groups into pages. Each page will have interaction element like button with which user can go to the previous or next group. Make sure you also have an indicator element that tells in which group the user is currently in. But since this is for mobile survey, you can use a single ...


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I believe 320 points wide is not an unreasonable width in 2019 because: Desktop users can still resize their browser widows to small widths. iPad apps in split view (including Safari) can be 320 points wide. iPhone SE (which was sold new within the last year) has a 320 points wide screen.


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I agree with Baldev Singh. It all depends on your target users, personas, or whatever term you use. Every time I do a website redesign for my clients, I always ask them to provide me their Google Analytics statistics (or something similars). So I know where most of the user come from and which device they use to access the website. As we live in agile era, ...


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It all depend on our target user as we are designing our app for small town and as we research, we find that our target audience are using 320 devices so that we have to design for them because we don't want to restrict our product for large devices.


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I can only speak from personal project experience for a multi million pound website re design. We're designing with 320 mobile in mind as a worse case scenario for mobile screen sizes. It may be a bit small for 2019 but it's a resolution that will catch all and work.


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