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I would do some usability testing first to see if any of this even matters. You can't ensure a great user experience without including the user, right? Do some usability testing to see if users get confused as to why the button is disabled. Your particular users might understand why it's disabled and this could be a non-issue. Adding help bubbles or other ...


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Adding an extra step to present the options in a dialog is also an option (if this task is not used often and is not tied to efficiency, so the extra step won't hurt a lot): Similar to this choice dialog in the Material Guidelines (but without the extra confirmation step):


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Here is an example of multiselect and multiactions.


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By 'scrolling between items' items i suppose you mean the different tests. It was my first impression that this could be confusing. If I understand correctly it is the users task is to input those test rather than have an overview over them in detail. Since a user will only input one test at a time it might not be necessary to have them all in one ...


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If each input is touchable and opens a modal for a user to enter content, it's not necessary the design look like a form. Actually all inputs are buttons, they can look like buttons or just text with the edit icon.


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This is how the Google sign-up process does it. It should be very similar to your process. Note that the primary button is always enabled, it only changes its function! You are presented with a pretty self-explanatory form The Next button has the primary color and can be clicked. Note that the secondary button takes you to a completely different process (...


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To me, it looks like you haven't actually disabled the "next" button, just toggled its behavior. So instead of enabled (action a) ↔︎ disabled (no action) you now have enabled (action a) ↔︎ enabled (action b) That in itself isn't necessarily a problem unless you render it as actually disabled. If you do, your users will expect other "disabled" buttons ...


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Since in mobile vertical screenspace is (almost) unlimited, I would just add a permanent visible message just above the disabled button. You need to fill out name, mobile number and agree to our T&C before you can continue. Since the message will only appear if someone scrolls down to the Next-button, it will only be visible to users reaching for the ...


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one of the key-heuristics in usability is "orientation" - one must know where he's at, at any given point in time. hence, when using a 85-15 modal you help the user know where he is at and how he can "cancel" or 'return' to where he was a second ago. note: this is theory. to say it was successfully tested - I DON'T KNOW. but it would be wonderful if you'...


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Too many options might confuse users. Remember to keep it simple and easy as mobile screen is small and preferably one-handed use. You can fit most common actions and add kebab icon for more actions or separate them into smaller groups which will expands when user selected one. E.g. user select Group 1, then the app prompt actions under that group. ...


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OH! I should also note that by adding a QR code to your print material, you can actually build in metrics you wouldn't otherwise have. Since it uses a URL you can track all sorts of information (user location, device, number of scans, user pathways - all the usual). Another important reason why you want to put practices in place that will incentive your ...


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If this weren't mobile, I'd say it would be better to have a message shown next to the disabled button saying Please fill in the remaining required fields (marked with *) or some such (wordsmithing required). But for mobile, where you don't have that real estate, having the button active (not disabled) and having it tell the user what fields they still ...


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I think the way you have described it makes sense. I would include an asterisk on all the required fields, even though they are all required. You could even have a note at the top stating all fields are required. Anything to help the user understand what to do on a complex form is best.


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In the end, both ways lead to the same result. Whether it's an inline error or maybe a bubble with feedback, the user gets to know why he can't proceed (which adheres to visibility of system status). The point about disabled elements never having an action is understandable, but strictly clinging to this rule is not really of service to the user. If he ...


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Going by the concept of 'informed decisions', it is always better to provide users with enough directions so that they do not make any mistakes instead of letting them find out that what they did was all wrong. If the form fields have required marked on them with an asterisk * or in some other way along with the other design intentions, the form will be ...


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I think you should provide multiple options that people are likely to have, and let them choose. That might include: URL (if it's dead easy to remember/type) App name (so they can search for it in an app store) QR code Twitter handle for the app or your shop (then a link in your bio) Aim for flexibility without too many options - three is probably enough. ...


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Just yesterday I used a new Amazon feature where I bring an unpackaged item to be returned to the UPS Store, show them a QR code, and be on my merry way. It was incredible. I'm seeing more and more QR codes finally make their way into the consumer space. I would say it's a pattern that is gaining popularity and that more "civilian" users will continue to ...


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Everybody has different preference for viewing content. I think best would be allow the user to set their own preference. For default, if you have metadata(like what content is in which language) you can choose the font setting per language(not user selected language). Every platform has some default font.


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Definitely I would go with QR Code. But I will also show them icon and name of the app; and a website. On website you could have a link for ios/android app. The people who use QR code will find it painless to scan and reach the intended app whereas its a hassle to go to website, or app store to install app, too many taps. Showing them icon boosts the user(...


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Also - you can customize / brand your QR codes to make them more visually intriguing – so long as you build in around 30% error correction. Here's a couple of examples one some I did (way back in the day).


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I've actually done a fair amount of work with QR codes in the past. It all depends on their implementation. If you simply slap a QR code on a poster - not so helpful. If it has a purpose and an incentive - people WILL scan them. They are widely popular in some countries. Basically - you've gotta give someone a reason to scan it.


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In the US and Western Europe it's not used much. The stats are actually quite dismal. I see very few applications generating interest in QR codes. Skiing and hiking trails where one doesn't need to take off ones gloves is a niche-market exception. On the other hand QR codes are really big in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea so if your market has a ...


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You should have a QR code, whether on screen or paper. It is important to note that both Android and iOS come with default QR readers. QR code is the easiest way to pass a URL. Unless your application is on the App Store, it will be difficult to get to the application download page without a QR code.


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TL;DR: Not that popular currently but might become so in the future. In your case I'd look for an additional option if possible. Edit: Because of RonJohn's comment and the many people who agreed, I decided to remake the charts in "true" form, so the numbers look less manipulative. Scanova.io cites a few surveys across the years and claims it's on the rise: ...


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I know we talk about platform agnostic design, but it's not really true. Touch-screen and reach are an integral part of the usability of a mobile device application. The reason this is important is because, keeping a 'Next' button in view is important, but making access to that button as easy as possible is equally so. This may come down to aesthetics, so ...


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I think you hinted towards a very good solution in your comment: Thus i was thinking of random usernames to show there, until they complete profile. Auto-generating the username and image empowers users to "dive right in" without a fully completed profile. By auto-generating a username and using a default profile image (either unique or using a generic ...


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Names are chosen at account creation, so it should never be blank. Most services use some generic image for the profile picture. This site appears to create random snowflake patterns, which prevents multiple users from having the same profile picture.


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It is 2019, Mobile Commerce (M-commerce) is growing! The Future of Mobile Commerce Is Already Here. Shopify Surveys, studies, and numbers are showing that more and more people are shopping on their mobile devices and the numbers are expected to only keep growing. I suggest researching what have changed to achieve this growth and what have been done to ...


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Two things that I would consider in researching this: Perceived Security of Mobile Browsing Research suggests that users view their mobile devices as less secure than their desktop. This could lead to them not wanting to input private data like credit card info into a mobile browser/app checkout. Link to PowerPoint on Perceptions of Risk in Mobile ...


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Here is a guide for scaling responsive-text (considering body font-size is set at 16px). Body Desktop font-size:1em (16px), line-height:1.375em Phone font-size:1em (16px), line-height:1.25em H1 Desktop font-size:3em (48px), line-height:1.05em Phone font-size:2em (32px), line-height:1.25em H2 Desktop font-size:2.25em (36px), line-...


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