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What menu items may be missing in an application: look at the tasks the users have to/want to perform with the application: are there clear starting points for all of them? During early tests: ask users if they are missing something - that is only an indication, of course, not necessarily something you have to do. Grouping menu entries: do card sorting with ...


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I would say go with whatever pattern you are using for the content. If it has a fixed width then also fix the nav width. You can still have the nav background be 100% width. If the site will be fluid then makes sense for the nav to be fluid too. When using a fluid approach though I would suggest having a max width set so it's not too ridiculous on massive ...


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People have a limited angle of vision, that is a physiological fact. If the viewport is too wide and the elements grow to far apart the page becomes difficult to perceive as a whole. So yes, I consider your image above bad UX :-) As a consequence a responsive design has to consider maximum widths and how to deal with very wide viewports as well as very ...


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There is no universal answer to such problems, look into "information architecture", "card sorting" for solving this problem. You say that the platform has all sorts of reports, tools and resources. This is a strong indication that two items at top level is too few. Settings/Profile as a menu item indicates rather static information to ...


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It is why text columns in newspapers work. The reason is in gestalt laws, the law of proximity: We perceive items placed close together as belonging together. Columns are further apart than the items within them. Here is a nice (if old) page illustrating this: https://isle.hanover.edu/Ch05Object/Ch05ProxSim_evt.html


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If the events are not intercepted, when the user is browsing the menu he or she may trigger some logic of the website accidentally, i.e. hovering over a few pixels nearby the context menu or just misclicking. This may harm the overall experience of the context menu. On the other hand, such a feature may harm the user experience, since it doesn't allow the ...


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First thing that comes to mind is to indicate the important menu item with a background color. Use a similar shade of the background color for a hover effect. On mobile, you could do the same thing but use a touch event instead of hover. Another option is to use a very benign/unobtrusive css animation to dictate the important menu item. I personally wouldn't ...


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Here some examples: Icons mediamarkt.de Color levi.com Typographic style adidas.co.uk Relevant info stackoverflow Product Logo hebo.com Mascot seek.com Figure/ground publitas.com Tagline esky.co.uk


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