Hot answers tagged

3

Due to the limited control possibilities on the mobile device, it will always be the case that there will be an unnecessary extra step for the desktop user if the behaviour absolutely must be the same. I'd suggest you to give up on this limitation. On mobile, something called "force touch" typically work as the right click alternative. You can do the ...


3

I suggest just pulling all of the functionality into the popover and using actual buttons to add or subtract points. You can use a single click/tap on the node to open the popover and a single click/tap to close it (you can also add an 'X' or clickout to close). Using buttons to manage the points provides you with the exact same functionality between mobile ...


1

In terms of User expectations, when entering into and using any Android app Users will likely expect to be able to access important information quickly and easily. It is unclear how Users will navigate between your two main pieces of content, but it seems that by pressing the More... button the Bottom Sheet will be displayed offering navigational menu items....


1

I think that it is a perfectly valid idea to start at the end and allow users to swipe through chronologically. The main concern is that the user is unaware that they can swipe to view more data. Adding some forward and back buttons to a fixed UI element that also displays the date for the currently displayed data would let users discover that there is more ...


1

I would use a "shift key" approach. For example: down in the lower left corner of the screen, have a Red X. A default tap on a Node assigns a point. If you hold the X, a tap on a node removes a point. An alternate is a "sticky shift" button, which is the same concept but doable with one finger. Tap the X, then a node, to remove a point; otherwise tapping a ...


1

I agree that forcing the same interaction pattern on mobile and desktop will be sub-optimal for one or the other, if not both. How many points are there at maximum in a node? If there are no more than 3 points, it would be possible to cycle through all values by simple click: 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, etc. You could keep this pattern on desktop and still keep the ...


1

I prefer your third option, with the buttons always being visible. You can utilise the "Continue" button even more, by disabling it when the user has not yet met the criteria of selecting an option. In such a case be sure to supply feedback when they select the button, explaining why they are unable to continue. I'd like to add that it might not be clear ...


1

The answer depends too much on things you didn't tell in the question, but to share a few thoughts: Let users at anytime be able to enter a location manually so they can save it for later or share it with someone. Or is it only relevant at that specific time and only for that user? What the begin state has to be without location data, is not something to ...


1

In this situation, the location data is in no way vital to your apps functionality. For that reason I would be developing the application assuming you do not have that permission and only use the permission to enhance the user's experience. I've recently developed a very similar solution for an ongoing project I'm working on. I defaulted to showing an ...


1

Though it is a very old post, now with technology improvement, there are options like GAMEPAD API with HTML5. Using hardware joystick and interacting with even mobile browser is possible. Worth trying such options if someone is looking for the solution still.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible