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27

TL;DR: Not that popular currently but might become so in the future. In your case I'd look for an additional option if possible. Edit: Because of RonJohn's comment and the many people who agreed, I decided to remake the charts in "true" form, so the numbers look less manipulative. Scanova.io cites a few surveys across the years and claims it's on the rise: ...


23

In the end, both ways lead to the same result. Whether it's an inline error or maybe a bubble with feedback, the user gets to know why he can't proceed (which adheres to visibility of system status). The point about disabled elements never having an action is understandable, but strictly clinging to this rule is not really of service to the user. If he ...


12

In the US and Western Europe it's not used much. The stats are actually quite dismal. I see very few applications generating interest in QR codes. Skiing and hiking trails where one doesn't need to take off ones gloves is a niche-market exception. On the other hand QR codes are really big in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea so if your market has a ...


10

If this weren't mobile, I'd say it would be better to have a message shown next to the disabled button saying Please fill in the remaining required fields (marked with *) or some such (wordsmithing required). But for mobile, where you don't have that real estate, having the button active (not disabled) and having it tell the user what fields they still ...


8

Also - you can customize / brand your QR codes to make them more visually intriguing – so long as you build in around 30% error correction. Here's a couple of examples one some I did (way back in the day).


6

This is how the Google sign-up process does it. It should be very similar to your process. Note that the primary button is always enabled, it only changes its function! You are presented with a pretty self-explanatory form The Next button has the primary color and can be clicked. Note that the secondary button takes you to a completely different process (...


6

I've actually done a fair amount of work with QR codes in the past. It all depends on their implementation. If you simply slap a QR code on a poster - not so helpful. If it has a purpose and an incentive - people WILL scan them. They are widely popular in some countries. Basically - you've gotta give someone a reason to scan it.


5

You should have a QR code, whether on screen or paper. It is important to note that both Android and iOS come with default QR readers. QR code is the easiest way to pass a URL. Unless your application is on the App Store, it will be difficult to get to the application download page without a QR code.


4

Going by the concept of 'informed decisions', it is always better to provide users with enough directions so that they do not make any mistakes instead of letting them find out that what they did was all wrong. If the form fields have required marked on them with an asterisk * or in some other way along with the other design intentions, the form will be ...


2

To me, it looks like you haven't actually disabled the "next" button, just toggled its behavior. So instead of enabled (action a) ↔︎ disabled (no action) you now have enabled (action a) ↔︎ enabled (action b) That in itself isn't necessarily a problem unless you render it as actually disabled. If you do, your users will expect other "disabled" buttons ...


2

Adding an extra step to present the options in a dialog is also an option (if this task is not used often and is not tied to efficiency, so the extra step won't hurt a lot): Similar to this choice dialog in the Material Guidelines (but without the extra confirmation step):


1

If each input is touchable and opens a modal for a user to enter content, it's not necessary the design look like a form. Actually all inputs are buttons, they can look like buttons or just text with the edit icon.


1

Here is an example of multiselect and multiactions.


1

Too many options might confuse users. Remember to keep it simple and easy as mobile screen is small and preferably one-handed use. You can fit most common actions and add kebab icon for more actions or separate them into smaller groups which will expands when user selected one. E.g. user select Group 1, then the app prompt actions under that group. ...


1

I think you should provide multiple options that people are likely to have, and let them choose. That might include: URL (if it's dead easy to remember/type) App name (so they can search for it in an app store) QR code Twitter handle for the app or your shop (then a link in your bio) Aim for flexibility without too many options - three is probably enough. ...


1

Just yesterday I used a new Amazon feature where I bring an unpackaged item to be returned to the UPS Store, show them a QR code, and be on my merry way. It was incredible. I'm seeing more and more QR codes finally make their way into the consumer space. I would say it's a pattern that is gaining popularity and that more "civilian" users will continue to ...


1

Definitely I would go with QR Code. But I will also show them icon and name of the app; and a website. On website you could have a link for ios/android app. The people who use QR code will find it painless to scan and reach the intended app whereas its a hassle to go to website, or app store to install app, too many taps. Showing them icon boosts the user(...


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