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46

I don't think you can guarantee it If you try to make people mimic how their signature 'should' be, you'll open a lot of cases where people struggle with their device and can't get it to look the same. It reminds me of every time I receive a parcel, and they make me sign that I received it. Even with a pen my signature ends up looking like a 3-year old ...


20

The natural orientation of a smartphone is portrait, and the natural scroll direction is down, creating a view which is very narrow compared to its possible length. If your table doesn't fit, you could consider either nudging the user to rotate their device to landscape, so that you have more width to work with switch the orientation of your table (roles on ...


20

My signature is basically habit and muscle memory from repeatedly writing my name with a generally standard sized pen. It varies a bit at the best of times. Even if you ask me to sign on a whiteboard using a marker, that varies a fair bit from my "normal" signature due to the implement being a different size. When I've signed for stuff in the past using a ...


12

Can we start with the obvious: Why? Follow up questions: Are you assuming your app has the same legal power as a "wet signature"? You may be in for a surprise! Do you have anybody on staff who is a handwriting expert? Have you seen what other "industry standard" applications do? E.g. Docusign, credit card readers?


6

I agree with @glorfindel's answer. Ideally, you need to know how your users want to see the information and then turn either the cells of every column or the cells of one row into something that looks more like a card or even an accordion if that meets user needs. Have a look at this link: https://medium.com/appnroll-publication/5-practical-solutions-to-...


3

I try to go with cards if possible. You can usually lay out the info with clear hierarchy to help users digest info in a logical way, and sometimes it is possible to omit column labels for certain information. In some instances it isn't feasible and I agree trying to prompt user to flip to landscape so you have more horizontal room for columns. You may also ...


1

I wouldn't, for a number of reasons: What you're asking for is likely to be no more legally binding than just having the user sign with their It's never going to match their identity documents. Touchscreens are just too inaccurate, especially when you make them use a finger. Actually verifying this will require a photo of the user's identifying documents. ...


1

Welcome to UX StackExchange @MACC. Try this: Select an element and tick the box "Fix position when scrolling" in the right tool pane. When creating a prototype in Figma you can define this element as an overlay to add a hover effect (see Figma blog for a detailed description).


1

I've done a similar thing for a client who wanted to release a novel app. We used a landing (or branding) page as a means of onboarding the user with minimal info and maximum feel-good content, especially when you target users through classical channels or social media campaigns. We found that a landing page prepares the user for an app that doesn't convey ...


1

IMO, landing pages are not just for providing info. Yes, it is a way to provide info but it can also act as an user interface in case the app takes longer to load on a poor connection. It is better to user a static page instead of completely depending on dynamically loaded pages. It is a way to increase the conversion rate. There are many more uses but i ...


1

I had been designing at 375 for many years then recently started designing for 320 and I totally hate it. It's just so narrow! Though I like to make sure everything looks alright and the messaging is clear for the worst possible scenario. The argument that people can still take their desktop browser and size it down to 320 isn't really valid to me. Regular ...


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