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It strikes me that these are both binary options. In that you can have closest OR cheapest as a sort and premium OR regular as a filter. Maybe you could find some sort of UI device that would allow the user just to tap the sort or the filter to switch each option to its binary opposite. "Premium would switch to "Regular" when touched once and ...


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Never. FAQs contain information that is usually unsorted, that requires context to answer and that is outside the structure you used to educate the user in the first place. When you create user information, you follow a certain structure, for example: what kind of software/machine/system is it? what can you do with it? what input data/material is expected? ...


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#3 Sounds the most intuitive. If there is no possible function, then why display it in the form of a button?


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You don’t want to design with using just color if you can avoid it. Having a combo of color plus form (a different icon) uses 2 levels of distinction. You’ll find Material design can use a warning triangle vs an error circle Now you have shape, which can be more powerful than color, so it can avoid color blind issues, poor displays, and contrast problems. ...


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#3 is the only right answer. This way you will be keeping your user informed about what is going on (the "visibility of system status heuristic") without cluttering your layout with a useless button.


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Accessibility Option 5 - none of the above. For every one of them you are using light grey text which is not high enough contrast with the background. You need to darken the text. Use a colour contrast checker to ensure your text colour is dark enough...then make it a little bit darker for good measure. Anyway that doesn't answer your question, it is just a ...


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Your 3rd option is definitely the best. You want to make it clear that the game is awaiting an action from another player and they just need to wait (or shout across the room: "Hurry up will ya!"). If your concern is about having too much text, then just cut it down to something shorter, for example: "Awaiting Game Master" You could even ...


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The Practical Argument You’re still at the wire-frame stage, so I’ll assume the cost of implementing the changes you propose are pretty negligible –maybe a half day of your time personally. So the choice is: 1. Run 5 or so more users on the existing wireframe to see if you see the same problem. If yes, then you’re confirming there is a problem but you haven’...


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It sounds like you've uncovered a cognitive accessibility issue. Generally in American education, if even one student with a disability can't complete a task because of inaccessibility, it can create a liability for the institution. It sounds like your tester was able to complete the (hopefully one-time) task, even though it was a sub-optimal experience. The ...


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My view is that 5 users isn't enough to draw robust conclusions. And I know Mr Neilsen disagrees. https://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/ I'd push the sample up to 10-15. The more variation (gender, age, experience) in the users you recruit, the bigger the sample required. "Sample of 1" data doesn't prove very ...


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If you are looking for a visual way to convey this information (not sure why it isn't clearer doing it with numbers), then you have to consider the visual icon or symbol and the status it may have. Without going into the visual design element (since it has more to do with graphic design), you are looking at least two different strategies: using the visual ...


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See if you can combine the label and status: The help text on "Assigned" and "Active" might be more useful when combined with the status it's describing.


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