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Think about this from a few prespectives... As a user: I probably don't care all that much about my contact information unless there's a requirement for follow-up. So I'd prefer to see the message field first. I may also like to see a select list of subject options so I know that my message will be delivered to the correct place. As the business: Users ...


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That whole interface seems overly complicated. Even with the video, I'm not exactly clear what's going on. So my rating is "low". Based on your description, it seems like a search/filter of content will be extremely important for most interactions with the system. With that in mind, I'd develope an overarching search pattern that works across the board. A ...


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I would avoid displaying those buttons until the search process resolves. Google's a bad example since the result doesn't require an action if it's not what you wanted. The two buttons you propose don't account for sad path cases like: That ID number doesn't exist The entered ID number esists but wasn't the intended record (eg I transposed numbers or fat ...


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Full Name > Email > Message. Don't forget to add mandatory stars to the input fields ;) It's almost world standard to ask first name/surname to the user on the contact forms or registration forms. I've attached just one example. If you will google 'contact form examples' You will see also all of them start with the name. This is not a written rule. But ...


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Remember always, as a principle, that we (as dev) should try to prevent user errors as much as possible. You are talking about a form that is filled in 3 steps. If you are worried about usability, you should consider the following: Users should know where they are at all times, meaning that it should be very clear to them that they are in step 1, 2, or 3. ...


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A good way would be to create checkers beside each information that the users would input. Let's say the user has to input four different information in screen A, then there would be four different checkmarks beside each info that lets the user know whether the input is valid or not. That way the user doesn't have to make the mistake first then have to go ...


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This is a good question but I am afraid the answers are going to be opinionated. My answer is based on my experiences with various apps. When a two-step exit is helpful On feed-based apps that don't/can't retain the current scroll position 9gag is actually a funny example as it does retain the scroll position. So, an accidental exit isn't as detrimental. ...


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Welcome to ux.stackexchange @Rajesh! An equally important part of the interaction design process is lending out an ear to the customer or client requirements and interpreting them correctly. Their persistence to continue the carousel based approach could hint at the requirement of making the events/programs visible from the word go, rather than pushing them ...


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Do you believe that thinking and brainstorming the extreme edge cases from the beginning will be a real help for your project? If you are addressing every edge case from the beginning, in my personal experience it distracts the team from focusing on defining the right problem and moreover, it misleads to find the right opportunity. Problems definitely come ...


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You should be designing for everybody. Or at least for as many people as you can. Designing for edge cases is usually a good idea, because that will usually mean that your target will be broader and that you'll cover users that would usually left out of the equation. Of course, this is something you'll need to find out by testing. If your edge case ...


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You could make the user decide which authentication he would prefer. However, you could set a default authentication type that all users would follow. Probably email, then add a 'use numeric code instead' option on the authentication screen.


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Clearly communicate the current state of the app/service/website to the user Do not send the missed data to all users Add a button to retrieve the missed data This way users who need the data will get it and you will not put a load on your backend.


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The questions your user has (who can view this, and what are my current roles) can be detailed near the item to which they lack access. I have no idea what your UI looks like, but perhaps something like the following might help get you started with some ideas. I tend to find it best to be as transparent as possible to the user regarding issues like this.


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If there are greyed out/inactive elements or areas that the user cannot interact with when it's restricted to them, I like to provide an explanation as to why they can't do the action. For example, on hover a popover appears with "You need to have admin access to do edit this data". Something you could test is to provide a list or type of overview of what ...


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From my UX viewpoint, notifications as toasts are good once I'm as a end-user is informed with something that is not so important or I'm surely aware of it as I triggered it explicitly, AND there is no damage if the toast is missed by me at all (let say, I'm eventually turned to my coffee machine for the next drink, or massaging my closed eyes etc.) In ...


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Neither of both, as they are controversial with "start from the first click" interaction. Users are afraid of missing the first click if they would think that the timer starts right after the countdown or after the button press. And countdown stresses users even more instead of calming down, as it is an anticipation of the test. The existence of either ...


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Answering your first question: When should a toast arise in web app? A toast should arise directly after: a user action has been completed the system is now under a new state (e.g. error, warning or success) The reason for a toast arising directly after actions or system changes is to provide immediate system feedback, which aims to reassure the user ...


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Well, you could see it from another perspective. Of course the message is the main point of the interaction, but here are a few thoughts on why that doesn't automatically mean it should be placed first: The first argument would be habit. Most internet users (at least in the west) are used to a form as on the right. Reordering it might throw them off. (...


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This is an interesting article of reasons that you should include a FAQ page to your website: https://www.websolutions.com/blog/9-reasons-your-website-needs-an-faq-page/


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There are different perspectives to answering this question, and they have been addressed in previous questions separately that you can consider: Internal Consistency vs. Consistency across the Industry, which is based on balancing what is considered best practice and consistency with your own product and users. If you have a new product and new users this ...


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I would do it with this priority: Message > Full Name > Email. Look at it from the mental model of people have a message and they type it then they sign their name. I hope this helps.


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Implement a general "browse" feature. One social media-style app that impressed me with its new user experience is an app called Yonder. It's a photo sharing platform focused on outdoor adventure. I, being a brand new user, obviously was not following anyone on this new platform, but instead of presenting me with an empty feed, it defaulted my experience ...


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To paraphrase, the point is that in the new solution there is an initial variability, while in the previous ones it is not? In order to make the whole application more consistent, you can add an initial value to all sorts (all option by default) - but this is definitely more work :O What if the proposed language label is identical to the previous one after ...


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how are you? I believe you can use some questions from SUS, eliminating the parts we asked "if the person would need some training". Moreover, questions focused on interface and usability, in my view, may be valid.


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For non-tech savvy users, it's hard to use gestures to drag items. Random click on the item itself – and user gets to the item's content. Gestures are non-visible, too. Here is a good point to use modes. Just let a user enters into the safe Change order mode and use buttons for re-ordering. This: makes it obvious of how to move an item up/down, or make it ...


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The best way to test these components is where they are intended to be interacted with. Create tasks for testing participants to interact with for specific components. For example, to test your input components, have a


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I actually don't see how you concluded that it would result in a user experience that is worse. What you described sounds a lot more like a novice vs. expert functionality to me: Experts can require extensive features, visual clutter, and a much larger information display density than the novice. Roughly, this means that the user interface that ...


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It's good UX design to introduce alternative behaviors The idea of putting a tooltip to introduce the back feature, is a user centric approach, you are making the user's life easier and thought beforehand the problems they are going to be experiencing. Though there might be instances where the user forgets of this power feature. Are you planning to show ...


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As you mention WCAG I will presume you mean websites. (you should actually look at ATAG as that is likely to be more applicable.) As long as you can reach every function by keyboard then your application / site is accessible by 'the rules'. Job done right? It may be enough to meet the legal requirements or minimums, but we should change our thinking to ...


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I seen this feature somewhere and it had a button with dropdown that contained a back arrow with the text Back and a down arrow that showed the history . This would be intuitive but for mobile it would take some space.


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This is a very nice approach. However, I would suggest that for consistency, it can always be triggered by the same circumstance always. This way the user would be accustomed to the response when in such situations. You can maybe also add a first time user prompt to give a brief description of the action when the circumstance is triggered and can add the ...


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I have also been faced with this particular decision and I must admit it really is a tough one. Having a 'long-press history popup on the go-back button so the user can skip to exactly where they want' would not make your user experience bad as long as it is presented to the user in an easy and understandable form. The end goal is letting the user know ...


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I think your biggest obstacle is that you want to treat email addresses as unique, but they are not. What you could do is allow users to login via email or user id. If they enter an email address that is tied to multiple accounts, demand that they select their user id from a dropdown account. Display: Your email address is used by multiple accounts. ...


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The way I interpret your scenario, you mean that a user of your system has to correct addresses for several people (not themselves) who've had undelivered mail. The only benefit the preview adds is a comparison to the wrong address in the same format. If that format, how it's printed on a letter / parcel is of importance, is important then I would say it is ...


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Very interesting problem. Combine accounts Combine the accounts but have multiple users within an account. Something like Netflix where you can choose your user after logging in. Force users to create a name for their user so they can distinguish themselves. Additionaly you could make an annoying banner that keeps popping up after they login that tells ...


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There is a reasonable usecase for that kind of preview - and it's actually used on this very site: markup or special formatting/layouting. While I'm entering plain text in the textarea/form, I would like to preview what the actual answer is going to look like. The same rationale could be applied to your scenario. We're constantly looking for recognizable ...


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