New answers tagged

0

While going to basics and using alphabetical order sounds fair it is usually not the most useful approach, users end up seeing the same IDs at the top every time the see the table. I would say it all depends on what is the most common thing your users are going to look for in the data you are displaying, some ideas: Most recent data, so they see what's new. ...


2

I'd be happy with the second mock-up, and unhappy with the first. It could be made even clearer by implementing a mouse-into action which emphasized the panel a bit more when the mouse was within it. (Discoverability: if unsure, just point without clicking, and it becomes more obvious). Comment: is it a list view, or a list of forms? The mock-up suggests the ...


3

The best UX would be letting the user decide if they want to pick up where they left off, or start over. Sometimes people abandon forms on purpose, because they don't like what they've written. Other times they fully intend to complete the form, but get distracted. When the user logs in again, you can do a few things: Take them back to the form they were ...


0

Banners tend to be used for high-level alerts and status messages. They might be a little disconnected from a table, visually. It would seem you'd have to tell the user to scan the table and look for the new column. Consider placing a dismissible tooltip directly on the new column: It's tricky to find a dismissible alert pattern that can work with multiple ...


0

If the developer team doesn't want to play ;-), the only possible option I see is to play with design. The biggest problem I see in the table is not the number of rows in the last column, but the monotony of the egalitarian repetition of different items at the same level. Personally, if I had to read all those lines it would be very tedious and confusing. ...


3

It looks like you're designing to help the user compare classes of life insurance and make a decision on which one to select. In that case, the user is likely going to want to compare specific criteria side-by-side. You might try a comparison grid, like this: Bear in mind that it's tough for anyone to compare 20 items - we humans usually can only handle ...


0

You have a few options... Never log the user out automatically. A weak option, and absolutely impossible if you store any sensitive information. Let the user set a preferred timeout in profile settings. When the timeout is nearly up, show a big notice — preferably a modal — that says Your session will expire in 5:00 due to inactivity. To remain logged ...


12

There are several examples of results with more than two lines, such as Youtube Studio, where a referent graphic element creates the separation without practically any visual perception problem and without using any added visual artifacts. In the case of the question, I would try to find this referent element. I have no information about the content, but ...


0

You can try below flow: User selects the type of service and items to be delivered Price screen Checkout Order processing spinner with a quick (and optional) survey You may also try placing the survey at other intermediate steps that require user to wait for some time and later do an analysis on the participation ratio for each of the survey placements.


16

Best practices for multi-line list items aside, the underlying concern here is visual grouping - users should be able to tell that a collection of elements are grouped. And for visual grouping you have Gestalt Principles: Single Line List Items With single line list items, visual grouping is largely based on continuity - the vertical alignment creates a ...


6

You could use different implementations of Gestalt principle to solve this: Law of Common Region by visually grouping items in one result (pretty much what you did on your second mockup); Law of Proximity by arranging grouped items to be closer to each other than to another group (essentially, by leaving more space between results); User testing is the ...


0

Alright, The user has a certain expectation of the flow which they would have learned from other applications over time. Most consumer websites with a checkout flow have the following flow "browse > add to cart > review > checkout" So this would also be the expectation of your user Seeing a survey question before review would be an ...


1

The question has an error: is mixing Close a file with Exit the application Close a file and Exit application are two different things. In MacOS the option to exit the application is in the application menu (Excel menu in the screen capture). On the other side, the Close option in MacOS does not immediately close the file, but opens a window alerting about ...


0

The only way to know is to do A/B testing I personally prefer A B would be better if you could somehow distinguish the 3x from the Item Name with a more distinct styling or color. Right now the quantity of the item is more obvious to me in design A.


6

Using the same type of icon for different actions within a website helps to interpret the project as a well-studied set in terms of design based on an efficient graphic systematization, merely using size contrast to differentiate elements of major / minor visual entity: If the approach is to use different icons, these should show a significant graphic ...


3

Well, the logic of inspiration comes from Dieter Rams' design of the Braun T3 radio (see image below). It is well known that Apple's chief designer Jonathan Ive "borrowed" a lot of inspiration from Dieter Rams' designs for Braun (although this particular one is attributed to Phil Schiller). In fact, this is a recurring question at any event or in ...


0

Yes, you should hide input fields that are currently not relevant for the selected input option. If you look at this simple example below you can imagine that multiple input fields would quickly become confusing. This is even more so the case if you offer not only the option to log in, but also to sign up.


1

In Adobe Indesign there's a third button: Change simply replaces the item and remains in the same place Change/Find replaces the item and jumps to the next search To keep the changes visible, there is nothing automated, but there are several tricks, such as adding a text style with a color highlight that is then easily searchable/removable by doing another ...


1

Try offloading the action to a single label (a text button) at the end of the statement, and have an input to select the quantity as a separate control. This way a user can select the quantity from a combo text input / dropdown (and you can use a tab index, so users can navigate into the field via the keyboard), where there's an 'ALL' selection, or user can ...


-1

if the button should use first person, it has to be 'view more' , not 'show more'. I want to view more. <- this is first person. Hey, show more. <-this is imperative.


0

Is a select box appropriate to control navigation on a page? For desktop No. For mobile Yes. IMHO. I have done some tests and found this approach appealing. Desktop: Mobile: Live: https://static.go4webdev.org/deploy


1

A visually hidden label is generally only used to benefit screen readers where there is something visual on the page that isn't conveyed. That is, if the design of the page implies a label is associated with an element through some visual connection but there isn't really a "programmatic" connection between the two elements, then adding a hidden ...


0

Instead of thinking of actions as affirmative or negative, the ideal course of action for the series of checkboxes would be to identify what the expected natural state of the newly drafted pages on your CMS. To draw parallels, unless you specify <meta name="robots" content="noindex,nofollow"> on a given webpage, it is assumed that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included