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Usually it is because the help or documentation is treated as a separate product because it does not follow the same information architecture than the home page. In your example this is also made clear by changing the header link to CannyDocs instead of just Canny. At a previous job we had the situation that the header link was the company logo and still ...


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There are some applications designed specifically for the application and management of tags which are supposed to be running over existing applications like TagSpaces which provides some ideas of how to do this in a scalable and flexible way. Fundamental challenges with using tags and designing for them include having a really solid information architecture ...


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Interesting Question and Flow. I am assuming I have understood your question correctly. Let us check the flow in this case. 1 : User Does a change(on CMS in this example) 2 : The change is validated from server side on some conditions you need to have a check with. 3 : User should be given the +ve or -ve feedback based on validation. It is a 3 step process ...


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The best option would be to go with the single password field, but ONLY if these are both applicable: Your "forgot password" functionality is a smooth process. It should be a quick and easy process that makes resetting the password can happen effortlessly. You give the user the option, with a checkbox or something, to make the password entry ...


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I think what you have in the second "dropdown" comp is a pretty good start. I would adjust the field sets a little bit to improve the overall experience. In doing some research, I discovered how some custom web design tools handle their container layout fields. One in particular was WebFlow. Their Sizing tools are pretty intuitive. First they set ...


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Lists are generally used to show items sorted by a specified criteria (even if it is just based on user preferences) and can either have a value associated with the item (which is it sorted on). However, in your case, to show items with the same order of priority requires some additional indicator to be applied to the items. An additional design problem to ...


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I am curious as to why you would push back on the carousel in the first place. If it's a concern regarding accessibility, then you should be able to implement it correctly. Basically, you just need to make sure it doesn't move too fast and the movement can be paused, stopped, or hidden entirely. Many pages currently implement this pretty well, you'll see a ...


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I think nobody will use calculator to select right price for translation to achieve total acceptable order amount. The first step is set all languages to maximal price and watching if final cost is acceptable. If not - the next step is lowering price of the most unimportant language. And so on. So we need to provide ability to easyly relocate languages ...


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I think there's no reason beyond the evolution of the design itself. This is what I think about usability in terms of design: Asymmetry: It's well known that asymmetry is perceptually more unsettling, thus offering greater visual impact. Spaciousness: The hamburger menu is used more frequently on small screens where saving space is a fundamental premise. ...


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< rant > It seems that the UX community is awakening to the notion that carousels are usually a bad idea, to which, I ask, “What took you so long?” They’ve been around for about 10 years and it should have been apparent from the start that animation is distracting, users ignore things that look like ads, people don’t passively watch websites like it’s ...


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As for the rationale behind this solution, there are discussions about it, e.g. in: the mailing lists, the bug tracker, the design policy discussion history, the design guidelines. The main reasoning for not showing that option appears to be based on the following observation mentioned in the design discussion: April - July 2012 ... Suspending a system ...


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Make it small, with 1 sentence, and a link to learn more. Find out what the real content is before you design around needing full screen.


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I actually think your slider idea is not that bad and might be interesting. Depending on how effortless the implementation has to be, it can also be a simple dropdown in the end: Edit Ok, in response to your comment. How about adding a button with an overlay that explains it all in detail. In comparison to a tooltip, this would work well on mobile as well! ...


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If you want to avoid the sliders, you can just opt for a very simple grid of checkboxes/radio buttons. Something like this: This makes it very easy for the user to understand exactly which options they are selecting for each language. I suggest adding some additional styling to the selected options to ensure they stand out from the non-selected options. You ...


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For new users, I think minimal setup time would be optimal. So something like option (A) would be acceptable. Create the least amount of friction on sign-up. I would assume the users do a typical sign-up with email and password, then once the account is created, the next step is to take them to a series of dashboard/account setup steps? Give the users the ...


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Most design systems or development frameworks have built-in notification or messaging elements, but often they are not configured or simply set to default values that may or may not be appropriate for individual contexts. A simple way to think about what 'best practice' should you, you can consider these different types of common messages that are generated ...


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Don't make the user input this data, in most cases. Having users remember, calculate, and enter their mileage is a fairly labor-intensive pattern. When a task becomes a lot of effort, users are less likely to perform it daily. A carbon-tracking app is something that you want them to develop a habit around using, so it needs to be very easy. Know what apps ...


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The most general answer of course is, "it depends." Who are the people using the product? What are they trying to achieve? Are they using it on a desktop or mobile phone? Are they using a mouse, touch screen, or keyboard to navigate (or other assistive technologies)? Is there flexibility for them to increase or reduce the density to what suits them?...


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