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3

I think there's no reason beyond the evolution of the design itself. This is what I think about usability in terms of design: Asymmetry: It's well known that asymmetry is perceptually more unsettling, thus offering greater visual impact. Spaciousness: The hamburger menu is used more frequently on small screens where saving space is a fundamental premise. ...


1

If the only options are inside or outside, I'd definitely go with outside. You'd want the user to be able to know there are filters applied without having to open the dropdown to check. I'd also recommend changing "Delete" to "Clear" or "Reset".


0

I don’t have the full context here, so i could be wrong. But something worth considering would be if you really need a collapsible panel at all. Why not just show the content upfront and you could have the edit and delete buttons in place of the chevron. People don’t mind scrolling if you provide a quick way to get back to the top.


0

My experience with real-life press and hold buttons ( like the tailgate lift controls pictured) is that the buttons 'press in' ( ie they have reward travel), you have to keep them pressed down to keep the action going. So with the digital versions it needs some kid of 3d effect to show that they are depressed ( and if they aren't 'held down' they undepress).


1

You're right to be concerned about communicating the need to hold. In playing and watching other people play video games, I've often seen users (players) conclude that some action doesn't do anything (or is broken or has some unmet requirement) because they did not press and hold a button, or in some other way did not “hold still” long enough to see the ...


-1

Can a collapse / expand icon do double duty with a built-in menu?


0

I believe there can't be a differentiation between buttons that can be clicked and buttons that can be pressed and hold other than instructions of use and feedback. Take for example the home button for older iPhones with a fingerprint scanner. When the phone is locked you just hold your finger on it and it scans and unlocks the phone. When trying to get out ...


2

The trouble with having a 'state-switch' button is that it can mean two things for the end-user: the current state what will happen when you click it which can be confusing. Please read this great article by the Nielsen Norman Group: "State-Switch Controls: The Infamous Case of the "Mute" Button" (https://www.nngroup.com/articles/state-...


6

The best practice is not to use a flag - flags are for nations, not languages. Many flags look alike or don't match the nationality of the user, which could be confusing. Use a label of the language that the page is currently in, and provide links to switch to other options in their languages. In the example below, the current language is English (US). There ...


2

Isn't this just a submit button? If it's loading another form, I would be inclined to label it 'Next' instead of 'Go', especially if it's possible to go back. It looks like you're essentially building a wizard of some sorts.


1

Different types of users will find it easier to pick up or read things differently, and so if your app is directed at a specific audience or particular needs, then you might find that you should cater more for their requirements. It might not necessarily be true that older users prefer text over icon (or vice versa), since there could very well be other ...


1

I assume that for each of the table and card component (and also for the widget), there is already a specified/defined layout and styling for the CTA. So to me that would seem to be the most logical position for the CTA in the container/widget because you are using a consistent design pattern/component. Of course, there might be reasons why it doesn't make ...


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