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According to the article published in NN/g: Selecting a precise value using a slider is a difficult task requiring good motor skills, even if the slider is well designed. If picking an exact value is important to the goal of the interface, choose an alternate UI element. Also, using a slider for a questionnaire is not an established pattern. I ...


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The icon currently used is understood as "external link", meaning the user will be taken to an url outside of the current one. It will likely create anxiety around losing the post. That been said, it is completely ok for a button to open in a new tab. An icon denoting so is not necessary (unless you are actually opening an external link). To ease user ...


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Ruslan, if you look at older — dare I say, "historical?" ;) — screenshots, you can see that button placement differs considerably between OS platforms. The Guidebook GUI Gallery website is an awesome resource to compare such details. I haven't seen any research yet on the impact of left/center/right alignment of buttons in dialogs, but the general rule of ...


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Back when this question was first asked (and answered), this doesn't seem to be a common practice for technical reasons or it just wasn't conventional to do so at the time (I believe that a modal or some way to stop other user actions was the standard practice. But since then there has been both questions asked about showing the progress indicator inside a ...


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welcome to StackExchange! (Sorry for the length of this answer. I felt like I needed to make sure you have enough fodder to convince whomever wants you to place buttons in the menu bar, that that is a bad idea, at least on a Mac. ;) ) You mention that this design is for a native desktop application. I'm most familiar design patterns for macOS, so I'll ...


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I believe it is called a “Split Dropdown”. You can find an examples here under the “Split Button Support” section.


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Actually this issue triggers me recently... So there's been said that the pointer is used ONLY when "the content indicates a URL link". As all the UI devs know, sometimes we use a button style/visual for a click event and sometimes we use it for a link. The user doesn't care if the final action is href="#gohome" or onclick="goHome()". For the user, every ...


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Firstly with the state changing I wouldn't worry about the button being in the same place. The user is performing a different action in both instances so will likely expect there to be different consequences. There are 3 options you could go with for this. Option 1 Which from what I understand is fairly similar to what you have already. Replacing the ...


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How do you see the current approach negatively impacting the user? If you were to leave it as is, would you be concerned that someone would be confused by what the "Save" button does, because of its similarity to the "Submit" button? And if after hitting the "Edit" button they were to click the "Save" button, when they actually thought they were clicking "...


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If < means closing the modal (as well as x button), the 1st option is OK, as it is commonly accepted to be there. Otherwise, if it is intended to be a "go to previous step", I would say 2nd option. In case of "go to previous step" meaning of <, I would make the button look like < Previous Step. The "reset" button, could look some ambiguous. Does ...


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I believe the first image in your examples has a sound hierarchy and structure, also especially since the back button's location has more or less become a standard and people are used to it being there. The only thing I think would need change is the "start over" button. It would be better to tell users what it is, simply by adding the text "Start Over" in ...


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Unless you have the resources to conduct your own Human Computer Interface research, your best bet would be to follow the Institutions who have the means to conduct such research. Google's Material Design is one of the best resources on the topic, and they put the icon on the LHS: Example from the sample page:


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I think you'd be correct in your assumption that users will be frustrated by seeing these disabled actions. However keeping the button is a disabled state would be a much more common and recognizable behaviour than any of you other suggestions here. I can't speak for your users, only from my experience but the pain point I see is that actions, that the user ...


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This is essentially an animated overlay that protects an interactive element from accidental use. While it is rare to see it on a button, it used to be fairly common on video player elements. Somewhat like the "play button" icon that lays on top of a video and only when a user clicks are they displayed with the actual video controls to interact with; like in ...


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Short answer is that I don't think it exists because it is a redundant design pattern due to the history of skeuomorphism in interface deisgn. Long answer: I am curious as to whether this type of design pattern is still used these days, as it is probably a type of skeuomorphism that tries to mimic the behaviour of something like this in real life called a ...


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