New answers tagged

2

Nathan Rabe's answer is an improvement on your idea because it wouldn't work without an explanation. But I'd suggest you another way (seen before on digg reader - unforunately discontinued) Instead of uncovering the actions via swipe (Cristian Negraia's answer), you can trigger the actions directly. Let's say: Swipe left -> Mark as read Swipe right -> ...


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I think showing two icons for single feature is little confusing. So you can try this options if you have enough space, If not then this will also beautifully distinguish options I've used font awesome upload download icons.


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You can also add the tray to better visually aid the differentiation. As for color I could not see a defined norm but I saw green predominating downloads and blue for uploads.


2

This could work, but it will likely need additional affordances. Be default, this does not have any discoverability: users won't know that three different actions are possible and may become confused they can't consistently trigger the desired result. That said, if you used icons or labels to indicate available actions, there is no harm (and usually a ...


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How about you swap summary and step 1, so basically one can check the all steps from single page itself, so they are prepared what info he or she needs to feel up. And you can take up the approach which you are following for the edit draft. Actually I have come up across lot of places where I want to see first that what info or steps I am going to follow ...


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I agree that icons might help with the function of the button, and if the actions are "Stop" and "Start" that adds to the affordance, and would help clarify the state further for the user. Since these are meant to show state AND function, presumably when you are in a particular state that control is not enabled - you wouldn't need to press "Stop" again if ...


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From My Point of view every screen or a scenario or a case or for a user goal There should be only one primary action representing goal or activity of that screen, we have to make sure that stands out. The more options we provide, the more distractive it becomes, the users will distract from the goal, it all depends, sometimes the secondary options ...


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In the design system that I've created for my company, I combined both types. Fixed-sized buttons better use for modal windows and pop-ups. That's more aesthetical and usual for users and pretend to be as "design pattern". So fixed-sized everywhere when we have 2 or a group of buttons. The width, in this case, is calculated by the longest possible text label....


4

Doing it like Gmail would work. Swipe left and right to uncover actions.


3

I think there's a distributing spaces problem in general, not only in the separation between buttons, but also in the button itself. The distance between the short text and the icon on such a wide button leaves unevenly noticeable blank spaces, together with the buttons layout cause a visual mismatch throughout the composition. Personally I would solve it ...


3

Divide the buttons as per their usage, group them, we can do secondary buttons as one group, primary button in another group - Large button, as shown in picture.


1

Eventhough there're possibly many alternatives for every aspects and none of them is perfect or better over the other for each desired case, I prefer the right choice because as far as I know and experienced, human brain works grouping similar things together. So leaving secondary buttons on the left side and leaving primary button on the right, alters ...


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I would avoid displaying those buttons until the search process resolves. Google's a bad example since the result doesn't require an action if it's not what you wanted. The two buttons you propose don't account for sad path cases like: That ID number doesn't exist The entered ID number esists but wasn't the intended record (eg I transposed numbers or fat ...


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whether style 3 is valid or not Yes, it could be considered valid, When the actions inside dropdown are on a similar level to "Reply". For Ex: Forward and Reply All, It goes invalid when the dropdown values are just a dependent of the primary value For Ex: Reply Preferences. This is because highlighting dependent actions alongside a primary action isn'...


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The best and the worst thing about UX is that there are no laws There are guidelines, best-practices, widely-accepted patterns and certain broadly defined rules. But no unbreakable laws. Split-buttons, by definition, should be styled as a group and at the same time, be properly separated. Styles 1 and 2 clearly indicate to the user that the dropdown next ...


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I think it stands to reason that it must be "valid", otherwise Google wouldn't be doing it. I think that the only thing you need to look out for is the spacing - in the case of the Gmail screenshot you posted, note how close the drop-down arrow is to the checkbox that it relates to, and note how the space between the drop-down arrow and the next button (...


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