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You might find studies done on specific websites, but the result may vary a lot depending on the site. It's true that you can see repetitive CTA across many sites and this could be a bit overloaded. a good solution for this is to create contextual copys for the CTA, so even though you redirect the user to the same page, the message on the CTA will be ...


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What a great question - this gave me the opportunity to do a quick check of some of the apps I use a lot to get an idea of how others handle this. I pulled screenshots from a banking app and Dropbox and they both put the more important or requested action up top and the cancel/back/undo beneath the top button.


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I'd place the delete button on top for two reasons: As you said it is the affirmative action, it's the more important one so it needs to be higher in the button hierarchy. If it is placed on top it requires more effort from the user to tap it compared to the cancel button which is placed beneath it, so we're making sure that the user won't touch it by ...


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An outlined button next to a text button gives the user a kind of hierarchy of potential actions. As designers we illicitly push the user to chose to click the first one (outlined button). Note that it (outlined button) is put on the right side, so if it is in a touch screen it will be the easiest button to reach (in Thumb friendly navigation zone).


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Use just one button with a door icon: when the actual door is closed, the button opens the door when the actual door is opened, the button closes the door


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It's not easy to get too creative with an element that is so restrictive in terms of size and space. There are important elements to consider not included in the question: What's the maximum quantity? What's the maximum price? Does the application supports different currencies? What's the versatility of the possible changes to make? Despite this, there are ...


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You probably won't know unless you ask the design team, but there are some principles for hierarchy and salience. Without having access to the decision making process, this is speculative. However, there are some popular guidelines in use for determining the perceived importance of a UI element. Google Material as an example Buttons take on 3 levels of ...


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Summary The use of a bipartite command button with an ellipsis button is non-standard, so there is no official right answer, except, maybe, don’t use a bipartite command button with an ellipsis because it’s non-standard. Frankly, very rarely could I see it being helpful, so just use the arrow. The Standards According to the Windows 7 User Experience ...


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