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I would recommend to produce an error message most of the time the same way: What is wrong How to solve the problem properly If the validation like it is in your example would be for 2 error messages you should still stick to this issue and try to summarize them. Because telling the User that the age is a mandatory field could end up in a second error ...


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yes it's partly clear :) When a coherent database exists, the task is easier in the implementation context. If we navigate the main interface (list function), easily creating or adding a new list of candidates from any interface will add to the same database. I understand that the problem in this context is switching between contexts / interfaces to ...


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Usually you would harness the power of blog posts to draw in people interested in the process because either they are potential clients or people working in the field that want to see how others work. My suggestion would be to first make a compelling showcase of a project and add the link to the blog in a manner that does not suggest that the user needs to ...


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Staying on the same page is always a better actions to not confuse customers. Adding basket is fully other action than navigating to the basket. On the other hand, it also depends on what you want clients to do... If user typically buy one kind of item It will make for your clients easier to navigate them to basket as Amazon did. Or showing it as a pop-up....


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From a LEAN UX perspective (check this link https://www.justinmind.com/blog/complete-guide-to-lean-ux/), I would go with the minimum of elements (MVP) in the beginning and follow the feedback of your users to add/redesign elements. I support the previous comment to prototype and test with users by giving tasks to complete. It is important not to test many ...


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There is no definite yes or no answer to the question. It depends on several factors, the same site can have very precise search and algorithm (AI/ML) assisted search. Real world examples: When I search for an "Audi Q3" keyword in a car sale portal, I would expect to see results that contain ONLY Audi Q3s, sorted preferably by price or any other ...


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You will never always return the same results This is important to remember. For various reasons, the SRP for any given terms is usually a slowly changing experience. The merchandise and inventory change, so the results should change. Maybe not today or tomorrow. But at some point, things are dropped and things are added. So, if it's not an immutable list ...


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There are 2 types of search: finding a specific answer or item or exploratory search i.e. discover the space of possibles. For the 1st type of search, where there is only one good answer, results shouldn't change based on who the user is and what they did. This applies when you're looking for a specific information (the actors in a movie, the date of a ...


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A very interesting read from https://www.nngroup.com about notifications, indicators and validations. In interaction design, a system should always keep users informed, by providing appropriate feedback. Ensuring that the state of the system is always visible is one of the 10 usability heuristics for interface design. (https://www.nngroup.com/...


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stacking toast notifications seem fine to me. actually toast are temporary UI elements which go away after a little delay (between 3 and 6 seconds usually). so stacking them is not a big distraction for users.


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Keep in mind that the way you train the AI and configure the parameters for the search algorithm is still based on user requirements, so there is definitely nothing to say what the search result should look like - this should be based on what the user expectations are. If the expectation of the user is that the 'search pool' is constantly changing, then for ...


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I wouldn't recommend the 'x' icon, because it breaks with conventions. An 'x' typically closes a window or container (e.g. makes it vanish), so user might get the impression that the whole dropdown would be removed when clicking on that 'x'. However, up and downward pointing chevrons are associated with expanding/collapsing content in the given direction, ...


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1.In a modern, ideally programmed system, filters should work dynamically in real time - however, due to system limitations: For a card with saved settings: a) Let's assume that we search for the target element by the X Y Z parameters b) We want to see the results so click apply.(the card closes automatically and we see the result) c) We see 30 results, ...


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I think it depends the type of online store platform you are working with. The online store I work for when buying there's a modal showing the quantity (345 in this example) + the unit price and the total: When checking the basket too: To me is very important to always show the unit price, this is very beneficial in the case of special discounts by ...


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I think that when you buy wholesale products (50, 100 etc.) the total price is really helpful The product can also be grouped and sold into packages (pallets, cartons e.g.) It is worth highlighting the number of packages (e.g. 1 set - 50 pieces - $ 500 - price) It is worth asking users whether such facilitation will actually be beneficial for them in my ...


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I think in this case, harder authentication but more secure is better than just easier sign in / sign up for average users who can't save themselves from privacy concerns. Put security above usability in most cases like this!


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OP could have added a picture to illustrate the context of use of progress bar. In this answer, I will assume it's the kind that indicates which checkout step the user is at, and each checkout step is on a different page instead of the same page. Progress bars are good for breaking down a long, complex form into shorter, digestible sections. E.g. a ...


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if the process is short, unnecessary solicitation feeling less = better Users must feel that they can turn back and buy more.


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In today's reality, many processes are limited to the minimum amount of interaction. The progress bar function is to show progress or signal at what stage the task is being performed. If the task is short or easy, it isn't required to create something that indicates its state. EDIT: If you consider Shopping-cart as first step of process - I think it's ...


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The best 2 solutions that I found until the moment are: Show 3 options for continue buying Show last seen products in a row See the print screens


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Just a keyword search is not enough unless it is a long and very specific keyword. Filters will be required to keep the search results in order. In addition to all these, the ability to sort them in a specific order. The search engine will need to be designed to consider and prioritise specific parameters from the index in displaying results. Considering ...


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I think the idea of custom search results awesome. But you hardly avoid if the user can't back to your site and make the same search and have the same result. You need to think about how your user we feel when this happens. Do you think the user will think: "Oh, maybe they change the search logic, let me try another keyword alternative" OR "Oh no, they don'...


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Assuming "add voucher code" is where the user enters a code to receive a discount... I would consider adding it in both places. If it is on the cart, the user can easily add it and see their total cost even before they are ready to check out. If they did not enter a code on the cart page, ask for it again in the checkout flow. If they have already done ...


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In general, it is best to minimize FAQ as a helper tool to something like checkout. It could be a big distraction to the desired user flow. If you have specific user pain points, like your shipping example, can you add a tool tip in line with where it is most relevant that shows just that question? The small orange question mark icon in the top right ...


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Maybe you don't want to buy something in the same product category, with that purpose I would take the user to the front page (that should be the one that let me see the general categories). If you are really buying objects on the same category, there are other alternatives before clicking to the "continue shopping" button, for example: "The users that buy ...


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Your objective is to have as many users completing the form as possible. It should be no longer than necessary. I would put it to you that the reasons for completing the form and the advantages of doing so by the user can be achieved by copy outside the form and thereafter the bare minimum of fields: contact details (email/tel) > reason for contacting (...


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There’s an “absolute” and a “relative” length of forms. You are referring to the absolute length here - the number of form fields. As long as the fields are necessary and help the user in a significant way, there isn’t a form that’s too short. The “relative” length of forms is subjective and based on what user perceives. The shortest form (e.g. 2 fields) ...


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If at all possible see if the sensors can send back a feedback when it is attached to the body, and that prompts the next automatically. This is the same as entering your credit details on purchase where you don't have to prompt next when you've finished typing the 16 digit card number and it automatically goes to the Expiry date or CVV Number. If you were ...


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Provide two (equal-weight) buttons: "Straps fitted OK" and "Show me how". Then you have no tempting "Next" button and new users are made aware that the video is relevant.


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