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Your first idea is completely legit. If your dev team can handle it, switching to a two-column table on mobile is ideal: left column for what used to be the column labels, and right column for the values. This is repeated per row. The reason I'd recommend this over stacking labels and values is that it allows for easier scanning of values. However, other ...


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A lot depends on exactly how your site is designed (a bunch of wide tables might benefit from the extra width, but something like Google Forms may not). Use as much screen space as possible until it no longer adds value to the user experience, then switch to fixed width and padding. For power users, the benefit of that little bit of extra space could make ...


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This is easy to target using your application/site analytics. If we consider the screen-resolution analytics in the image below, we can understand that if we keep the page-width between 1280px and 1920px, it will cater to all users and more than 50% visitors are using screens wider than 1440px. Considering this, we can ignore how the screen looks like on ...


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A lot depends on the overall structure of the application for example, use a hybrid is possible. I notice the trend that modern sites are more flexible Full screen resolution: Arguments: greater control over the template using %, em and rem scales more easily on more resolutions Againsts: display issues on custom resolutions (personally I have LG ...


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This is one of the reasons some designers prefer to use the mobile first approach, as it forces you to fit everything you design in the tiny screen estate you do have. If you start with desktop, you may end up with something that cannot be scaled down. Your table for example is OK for desktop, but far too information heavy for mobile. You could go back to ...


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You should embrace the limitations of the device; mobile phones have screens that are narrow and tall. Adapt your layout to fit it. Instead of having the name and email side by side put them under each other, check this quick mockup (ignore the proportions). It's similar enough (same elements visible simultaneously in the screen) that users won't be ...


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I have faced the debate, this is my conclusion thus far. Slide Out vs Modal In an application, it is important to make the distinction between information that requires immediate attention/action and those that do not but need to be in context. Slide Out Helps keep a consistent design by size/height vs a modal that could have various width and height ...


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"(...)using Axure first (...) you can make the content, layout and structure do whatever you want." Actually, you can do whatever you want not only in Axure but also in a tool like Sketch, Photoshop or any other design tool. The fact that the tool doesn't offer the possibilities to mimic the interactions doesn't mean that they are not planned/designed by ...


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