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Maybe a pinch gesture could work, rather than a button which will always get in the way of one thing or another. When the iframe goes full screen, it's like zooming in on it. So it would make sense to pinch it (zoom out) to go back to the minimized version. The issue with gesture is that they are difficult to discover. If there is an animation when ...


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you can show a message at the top center (like youtube) press ESC to close the window. It's easy and people are used to it.


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Do you know Quora? Also stackexchange is site with question. Important elements in the implementation are the elements that you design in order for the API to create the model (date, description, title, etc.) Which form will be the most pleasant and useful for users? Many aspect question, but changing the old layout to a new one seems sensible. Also ...


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A lot depends on exactly how your site is designed (a bunch of wide tables might benefit from the extra width, but something like Google Forms may not). Use as much screen space as possible until it no longer adds value to the user experience, then switch to fixed width and padding. For power users, the benefit of that little bit of extra space could make ...


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This is easy to target using your application/site analytics. If we consider the screen-resolution analytics in the image below, we can understand that if we keep the page-width between 1280px and 1920px, it will cater to all users and more than 50% visitors are using screens wider than 1440px. Considering this, we can ignore how the screen looks like on ...


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A lot depends on the overall structure of the application for example, use a hybrid is possible. I notice the trend that modern sites are more flexible Full screen resolution: Arguments: greater control over the template using %, em and rem scales more easily on more resolutions Againsts: display issues on custom resolutions (personally I have LG ...


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Like Calum said, a relatively simple approach (build-wise) would be to create an appendix/help section, where all important terms are defined. This could be linked to from your tooltips, which could provide truncated definitions. Worth noting that this would likely take considerable content writing. Alternatively, you could create onboarding slides or coach ...


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Gov.uk has a lot of information that users aren't particularly familiar with and they explain it with a linked "contents" list. You could use something similar to their "How it works" section, please see link below. https://www.gov.uk/shared-parental-leave-and-pay


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This case sounds to me like developers decided from their own point of view which options shall be offered. This may lead to cluttered, overloaded UIs and is not necessarily what users are able or willing to enter. More options lead to more confusion. Not every bit of an application needs to be tweaked. In this case I would go one step back first and ...


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With that many options, probably the most important addition would be a Search facility. However logically and consistently you manage to group your 200+ options into 20 categories, you are going to get users who know (roughly) what they want to set/alter, but cannot immediately see which category it might fit in. Having a search mechanism where they can ...


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Ok, 18-20 categories are available, it is worth determining who is needed in those categories at the moment. I think the situation when the user browses 200 categories is unlikely. In this situation, you can only display what is used - or sort according to the most to less useful. For more accurate advice, I need more information: What do these settings ...


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For keyboard and screen reader users, this can be very confusing. If you're trying to tab through the fields to get to whatever's after the fields, it would cause a search to be submitted just by navigating through the page. Performing some action just by tabbing through the fields would be a violation of WCAG 3.2.1


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Daniel, I agree with Joao's layout suggestion, because it places related options closer together (think "Gestalt Law of Proximity"), so the perception of grouping is stronger. The vertical layout also make it easier to scan the options' labels, particularly if the lengths of the labels differs quite a bit. As for the tooltips, I ran into a similar issue in ...


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Here is my suggestion: Instead of checkboxes, use toggles since the user is "activating/deactivating" a functionality and for the help icon, show it when the user is hovering an option. The fact that all options are vertically aligned it helps the toggles to be aligned to the left and the text readable from top to bottom.


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The question mark with the black balloon icon is suitable for isolated situations, but when a full text has a tooltip icon for each option it's something totally unnecessary besides being a redundant visual noise. The help info can appear simply when hovering the text without any extra icon. See this example


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