New answers tagged

1

As you mentioned, there are some best practices that are consistent with general UX design principles. However, in your case if the technology requirement/constraint seems to be the dominant/primary factor that is creating potential issues with the user experience, then chances are creating workarounds in the user interface is going to lead to a suboptimal ...


0

I thought about making the back-page contextual, so if I reach the form from page x, I'll go back to x ans so on... but I don't know if this is a correct behaviour for it. That's what users expect from the back button of their browser, so it seems like correct behaviour. The behaviour you describe in the beginning (Entity List of A --> Create new A) can ...


0

Don't use the actual value of the slider as bandwidth, use it as an index into a lookup table of possible bandwidths. Show the user the value from the lookup table, not the actual slider value. This works well whether you have just 5 options to choose from or 50. An Alternate Approach If you do have a lot of bandwidth options to choose from, a slider will ...


0

Don't have random steps missing. Simply show all steps and then validate that its an allowed value and let the user know if its not. This will prevent the user from getting frustrated when they can't select the value they want (which isn't allowed) on the slider. This is somewhat equivalent to a text area with a min/max text length. You shouldn't prevent the ...


1

Let the user choose which notifications they want to receive and how often. Some apps/sites allow users to receive a weekly summary email bundling all of their messages/notifications. Others will send sporadic nudge/reminder emails about messages after a few days. In general, I would say you should assume your users don't care about your app as much as you ...


4

The reason you see that on the Material UI website is due to it's sheer scale across the world. Showcasing that they have a RTL version is in their best interests as they reach an even bigger audience. Don't be fooled though, most of the frameworks include RTL options, for example Bootstrap has a RTL version, foundation also has a RTL version they just don't ...


2

Just let them type it in and do input validation. Save yourself a whole lotta headaches.


1

0 to 1000, use a slider with 1001 values (0-1000). 0 to 1000 in steps of 5: use a slider with 201 steps (0-200), multiply value by 5. 0 to 100 in steps of 5 skipping some values: use a slider with X steps (201 minus number of skipped steps). if they are random as it looks like, keep a list of the skipped steps [20, 45, 60, ...] and then correct the ...


5

It is better to go with a simple input field that only accepts numeric values to min and max of 0 and 1000 respectively. i.e Letting the user enter the numbers from the keyboard. Use JavaScript to only allow divisible by 5 numbers. Show proper validation color codes to guide the user. To make UX better on Mobile and tablet, we can use HTML attributes like ...


3

For me the combobox is the control for "a set list of allowed values". Use a combobox that filters the values based on the typed in value in such a way that the nearest values above and below the input are shown. That way you dont have a bazzilion things in the drop down except when the user wants to. If you want to you could combine it with a ...


13

How about a slider connected to a listbox (please be advised, the following imagery is garish and not for the faint of heart :) ) Or It allows a coarse selection with a slider and fine-tuning with the listbox. Bonus points if you make the selected value editable and the change will slide the slider and move to appropriate rounded value in listbox (In other ...


3

I like (and have personally implemented) the type of control described in musefan's answer. Such controls have their upsides and downsides, which need to be carefully considered. Here is an alternative worth presenting: Would the user be good with the website matching the nearest acceptable value (rounding up or down, depending on which provides better UX)? ...


16

As others have noted, we don't know what the actual use case is here. The OP has asked an isolated question out of context of the environment in which it's intended for use, and that's absolutely the wrong way to design an interaction. I highly suspect that this is an X-Y problem in that the question has been posed to solve a secondary problem Y, which is ...


22

How about a combination of a slider and a spinner (number stepper)? How does this work? I am glad you asked... Your list of values is effectively an array. So rather than the slider having a list of values, it just works on the indices of the array. So if you have 10 values in array, then slider handles values 0-9. This solves your technical issue because ...


Top 50 recent answers are included