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@Izquierdo's answer is quite reasonable. But if you still not sure what user prefer to do after entering data into the form let him decide himself by adding one more action button: SAVE SAVE AND EDIT CANCEL


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It depends on what will likely happen next. If the user will want to keep working on the newly added item (let's say they're writing an article, and want to keep editing a draft), they'll stay on the Newly Added Item page. If they're more likely to want to add more new items, they should be taken back to the All Items page so they can click the Create New ...


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I don't entirely disagree with many of the answers already provided here. We should generally be forthright about manipulations we do that would surprise a user. But to address the actual example provided (an input field for entering numbers), the W3 spec is opinionated in favor of silently rejecting non-numerical entries. The very first line of the the ...


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HTML5 allows for a number input, which has a + or - spinner and as someone mentioned you can set a min/max value. This will do your server side validation (prevent anything but whole numbers from 5-14 as you wanted. Your devs will need to do serverside validation (samething with the radio buttons they have to be serverside validated as well). Typing in a ...


3

You might consider a pattern that communicates the status of the form to the user without inferring anything about the content of the form. (An asterisk is often used to indicate that something has changed, but in the specific context of a form, it could infer that it's required.) Status chips near the title can tell the user that something is in progress ...


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There's a similar situation on the profile form of some sites. The example in the image below shows several alerts and actions that may be useful: In the upper left there are two links (green): expand all items and close all items At the top there's a text line in a red background and outline warning : Verify the following errors Each items in the list has ...


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There isn't a real limit on the number of inputs for a modal window form, but there are other considerations: Should the user be prevented from working on any other tasks? If so, that's a modal. Does the user need to reference anything else on the page while working on the form? If so, you might consider a sheet. If the user accidentally closes the modal by ...


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The interaction is based on a model where tab moves between form elements and a radio group is a single "element". A checkbox is clearly a single element that comprises one choice, while a group of radio buttons is treated like a single element because they all work together to form a similar choice. Tab moves you between each as they represent a ...


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To your first question: On a mobile screen, it's always a good idea to show/ask one thing at a time. Also, based how you want to handle score confirmation, it might be better suited to a pop-up card of its own. To your second question: Let's first look at the problem. Your use case calls for 3 distinct scenarios: Play hasn't started yet, one player streams ...


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