New answers tagged

3

Fixed Decimal Benefits Reduced Input Errors Requiring no decimal reduces syntax error handling. The input is limited to 0-9 numeric characters and delete/backspace. So you help avoid cases like “54.2.89” (multi-decimal) or mistype of decimals. Requires No Decimal (or Comma) Sticking to digits 0-9 means you only need to use the top row of the keyboard. ...


1

Generally I think that every element or component should satisfy the principle of affordance. Meaning it should be obvious what they can do and how they should be used on the first sighting. In your case you should come up with a style for your input fields that makes it obvious that they are input fields. My suggestion is to have a look at design guides ...


0

Since users are not required to answer all the questions I would split the groups into pages. Each page will have interaction element like button with which user can go to the previous or next group. Make sure you also have an indicator element that tells in which group the user is currently in. But since this is for mobile survey, you can use a single ...


2

The Fixed Decimal approach reduces confusion in a numerical field that requires decimal points. Look at bank ATMs: when you're entering the value of a check (which you're depositing) you are using the Fixed Decimal approach. They do this as they want to reduce the chance of error. If one types in 28 the question is: are you depositing $28.00 or $0.28


2

This is a design review, I believe that is not the right type of question that people expect to find here. Anyway, if you came here with theses you have a reason and you did not find help anywhere and I will help you with some UX tips. At first, I do not see a big UX difference in your templates. Everyone looks the same. From my viewpoint I suggest you to ...


0

Maybe you could use a little gamification. First, you have the user sign up only with the essential info, so that they don't leave the platform before having finished to sign up. Then, you can encourage them to complete the missing info after they created the account. Option A: give the user points for completing sections. This however makes sense only if ...


3

The less friction you can put in front a user who wants to register with your site, the better. If your onboarding process is too complex, you will lose users. I would get the user signed up with the absolute minimum of information necessary, then maybe on subsequent visits give them reminders to fill in the rest of the data. For example, "If you are not ...


0

I think you're right for the most part. I would go with solution B The few changes I would recommend are: I don't input type checkbox is the right way to add a new section to the form. It could be a thin button or link. There should be a way to remove the added section. Add a remove / delete icon. The user should be allowed to add more than one previous ...


1

If you want to keep the slider I advise you do something like the picture down below. You may need to make your own slider or add a toggle button to change it to separate days. The blue being the working hours and the black being time off with added dates underneath the text in a grey. If I were you I would drop the sliders and opt for a separate screen to ...


1

You could use a combination of date / time picker as the example below (from this blog post). This way your users can choose the time slot in whatever way is more convenient. You could default the day to today (or the previous day, depending on when do you expect users to log their work hours) so users whose shift doesn't span multiple days can just select ...


1

Like our discussion on comments my full answer for it is: Add field to select the shift. This is needed if the employee starts the shift in a day and finished in another and is optional based on your decision on my second suggestion. Could be a select or a tag selector like this: Change slider for inputs or make numbers before and after input fields. Don't ...


0

In the HTML, label the email field "username", both name and ID attributes. Use "Email" as the label that the user sees. They will be setting a login that is an email. Don't capture a separate username, as that might be confusing ("Which do I log in with?") Use Display Name as a handle that will be used throughout the site.


0

I would like to recommend a different idea. How about creating an animation to display a loading percentage bar after having pressed the submit button, while at the same time disappearing the form. If you can make the progress bar connect to the progress of the uploading data, so much the better, otherwise an animation should do. Once the uploading is ...


0

You can change the "x" icon at the top to a "< Back" button. The title can become static, like "Describe Anomaly" and "Anomaly of Third Item" can be moved down to the main content area as a subtitle. Each level that the technician drills into can slide out with a bottom Save and top "< Back" button returning the user to the previous screen.


0

The main purpose is to let know user that their information was successfully saved: Then, I work in this way: (if information has to be exact) Display a modal, with summarizing about what will be stored, and ask for accepting send it. After accept send information, show a charging icon, in order to show that information is not saved yet When you have a ...


0

move it dynamically depending on where the question/prompt ends on the screen I wouldn't necessarily move the button with the size of the question. It is very natural to have the button within an easy reach of the thumb. BUT I would not have it statically shown in the bottom, since then it would be hidden by the keyboard and would require an extra click (...


0

I believe this is a usability / privacy tradeoff scenario – where the most user-friendly option actually sacrifices a bit of privacy / security for your app as a whole. There's a more detailed answer on this article at Security Stackexchange, but I will try to summarize here: If you verify that an Email address is used for an account on your application, ...


4

Tom, how granular does this setting have to be? Especially for less technically savvy users, providing a set of meaningful presets could already do the trick. E.g., here's the menu for setting the alert for a calendar event (taken from Fantastical for Mac): If you click Custom…, you get to see this: If that doesn't work, you could simply concatenate ...


1

I am writing this opinion considering you are only talking about mobile. For mobile, if your modal popup covers complete screen then it would be a new screen for user. So the interaction would look like hierarchical drill down. In this case calendar on popup (for user its new sceen) should be ok. In case of web, if your date picker covers full screen, then ...


1

Calum, I see two challenges with nested modals: Users may lose track of where they are, and Backtracking through multiple modals is tedious. I've seen quite a few designs that go two, maybe three, modal dialogs deep, and they worked reasonably well, because those modals were highly focused. For example, here's a screenshot of macOS's Siri preferences ...


0

Consider adding an "Optional secondary contact(s)" section at the bottom of the form. Here users can input as many contacts as they need. This example shows that the user has input one secondary contact, and may continue adding more as needed: If your system limits these to 2, then instead of using a table here, you can just have 2 optional sections (i.e. "...


Top 50 recent answers are included