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The only way to know is to do A/B testing I personally prefer A B would be better if you could somehow distinguish the 3x from the Item Name with a more distinct styling or color. Right now the quantity of the item is more obvious to me in design A.


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Visually of course, they serve to communicate information. If just purely visual elements, then certainly you have some freedom to use different sizes. However if they are buttons and clickable, they should all be the same size. Consistency in UI is part of overall design and UX. Consistency in size and style teaches the user what is a button, and what is ...


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I think "nobody likes to read long lines" is a lame excuse. There is a great gulf between current practice and excessive length, and I think a principal reason for such narrow windows as we see, is that sites are written to fit cellphone limits. Who wants to bother with the effort to develop the cellphone version AND the "desktop" version ...


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In addition to the other excellent answers here, don't forget that the early years of the Internet were plagued with great browser wars. Standards like HTML and CSS existed, but "standard" didn't mean what it means now. Browsers back then were products sold in a store, like any other piece of software. They differentiated themselves by the ...


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As others have said, early versions of HTML and CSS were much more limited that what you are used today. Consider, just taking into account Internet Explorer, which was predominant or at least a major player at the time (remember that Chrome only appeared in 2008, and only reached the 10% threshold in 2010): border-radius used for rounded corners were ...


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Specifically for UI elements - arrows, buttons, etc. - there is another factor. Font Awesome (2012), SVG (as late as 2011, depending on browser) icons (which appear to be what StackExchange currently uses) and other ways of generating high-quality icons without using image files simply did not exist. I found a fairly good explanation of the evolution here.


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While it is not usually very intuitive, it's pretty easy to define margins, columns and gutters that follow round figures. You have to simply be cognizant of 3 aspects in this specific order to achieve this: The margin size you wish to leave on each side (this is usually easy to identify given that you know the screen resolution you're targeting your design ...


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Was CSS not as advanced or something back then? This is the reason. When websites first became available, there was no CSS, and they didn't even support tables! Websites were usually designed by slicing a mockup into different pieces and hyperlinking the pieces to different places (or using one big image and an imagemap.) Remember, this was at a time when ...


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In computer science, best practice says that a boolean flag should default to false with a value of true meaning 'change default behaviour'. For example, rather than function ShowUserDetails($ShowAddress = true) you should use function ShowUserDetails($HideAddress = false). This also generally applies to user interfaces. The checkbox should default to ...


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In Adobe Indesign there's a third button: Change simply replaces the item and remains in the same place Change/Find replaces the item and jumps to the next search To keep the changes visible, there is nothing automated, but there are several tricks, such as adding a text style with a color highlight that is then easily searchable/removable by doing another ...


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Pre-checking is not a dark pattern in itself, it's how you utilize it. Context is important If a user sets a default setting on their profile, what then? Checkout screens Imagine a logged in user is about to pay for something, and the screen doesn't display the card they clearly stated they wanted to save, and keep as a default? That is considered a dark ...


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Try offloading the action to a single label (a text button) at the end of the statement, and have an input to select the quantity as a separate control. This way a user can select the quantity from a combo text input / dropdown (and you can use a tab index, so users can navigate into the field via the keyboard), where there's an 'ALL' selection, or user can ...


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There's a paper (https://www.alandix.com/academic/papers/scrollbar/) which argues that the reason for scrollbars to be on the right is that you imagine using it with your hand, and don't want to obscure content by putting your hand in the way. Of course, for lefties you'd want the scrollbar on the left. I've recently been thinking about interfaces with two ...


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I like the way Windows does it. I have seen it being called mouse sensitivity, mouse acceleration or pointer speed. I would call it mouse sensitivity. One reason I see for a numerical setting is so that the user can get a better feel for what the value does, e.g. choosing a sensitivity that is twice as high will lead to twice as strong effects. The other ...


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In general, lists with multiple elements are usually accompanied by keyboard help. When clicking on a letter, the first element of the list is the one that begins with the letter pressed. At a graphic level, we have this situation resolved horizontally but not vertically. Although the example is a list whose elements are arranged vertically, one below the ...


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