New answers tagged

3

I have worked on similar project. Having different styling for subsite is not a bad thing, and at the same time it is not advisable and recommended to have it with drastic visual design changed, Here are some of the reasons why: There is already a parent website that is familiar with your target audience, if they are used to using it they wouldn't ...


1

Generally I‘d avoid tabs for most things because they hide content and are generally harder to use than just laying out the content in plain site. That said, if the content of each tab can be clearly labelled and the first tab (the one that starts open) is more relevant than the others, and users don't need to see all the contents of all tabs at the same ...


7

There's no repetitive action here, unless it is expected that the user will install many products in one visit. Having similar buttons do the same thing to different pieces of content may look ugly (I find that very subjective), but it's very easy to understand what the buttons do. You can get rid of repeating buttons but that forces you to divide the ...


6

You are going to sacrifice consistency for repetition if you want to take this approach. The design pattern used is a series of card components in a full page grid layout, which requires each component to be replicated. If you remove the primary and secondary action, it will require creating another section on the page to process the user actions so you ...


2

Does it have to be a dropdown? If the range is not a huge one would it be okay to use a slider to select the items. It would be much better to see the whole context and see where it's been used. If it's located within a small dropdown ofc slider is a terrible choice. If it's on mobile that's much worse lol. But if you really need to use icons, I would ...


2

I understand that you are trying to reduce the number of text in the page, which is a good thought, however as a best practice try to use the standard UX pattern which is well known and proved to work well. Also, users may interpresent an icon differently according to their content and culture, so it is difficult to design a good icon. I assume the 'items ...


20

One way is to differentiate primary vs secondary buttons. You could keep “Install” as the prominent button and “Documentation” as the secondary link. Something like this:


2

Context is pretty important for this one. For general websites I have always considered top navigation as primary and sidebar menus as secondary navigation. The advantage to sidebars here is where there is lots of information and having the preview of other sub-menu items highlighted can expedite users finding what they're looking for. E-commerce and ...


1

Q1. Is this for data input (in which case you want it to be as painless as possible) or for a game (in which case you sometimes want to make special combo's difficult and the reward is in mastering them)? Q2. How many different individual elements are there? 12 or less? If so you could map them to the function keys on a standard keyboard and let people ...


2

Now probably that's not a great answer, but top panels allow you to put the full menu item name without taking too much space. Side panels have a tendency to show icons mostly because the space they take if you add the full name of the icon will be vital.


-2

If you don't have to be particularly formal, you could use some variant of: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ This one is supposed to be a shrug but doesn't render well in my browser at least: 🤷


5

You could include the min and max values like 1.5 - 1.8 Then all rest of the options.


0

Disclaimer: I am not a UX/UI designer, but I am a user who knows what he wants. I will repeat a few points that I think are very important: This is a form, users hate forms If forms are unavoidable, you should do everything to streamline the process to make them as quick and effortless as possible. This is especially true for forms that will be completed ...


2

Take a look at Turbotax. They simplified the tax filing process into a series of steps that focuses the user in the task at hand. They have complex interdependencies and rules working in the background, but on its simplest form, it’s a multi-step form. Different from other multi-step forms, where the steps are laid out on the top, Turbotax relies in a side-...


0

The problem starts with the number of input fields we have in the form. Try to reduce those first. We can help users by trying to reduce cognitive load. Try to display an average 7 field at a time. For that we can ask only what's required and eliminate optional fields. Instead of putting everything in a single form, make multiple forms. Just like when ...


0

Is there any way to make the journey for user interesting? What do you mean by this exactly? Should a form be interesting? Or should it be simple, easy, and useful? Have your users requested the form be more interesting? Do you have a link to your form, or a screenshot? Accordions should only be used as a last resort. For multi-part forms it is better to ...


-1

Perhaps an empty set would work, like... {?} {1.5} {1.52} or [ ] [1.5] [1.52] or [x] [1.5] [1.52]


-3

The audience for this question is pretty high-brow. In my experience, "Concept" does not inform "assumption". Hence, the UI does need to be specifically worded. Murphys' Law "Use words. Why do you assume that a star would convey the meaning "all"?"


1

I agree with some other comments here that something like --- only indicates that nothing has been selected, but doesn't indicate if something must be selected. Likewise, an asterisk * could be mistaken to indicate that the field is required. I only have two quick ideas, neither of which is perfect: Use the infinity symbol ∞ to indicate "all", but someone ...


1

This is a simple microcopy issue. We really just need to provide clear terms that aren't confusing. For the "online account", you could call it "Identity" or "User". The "financial account" would be "Account", but possibly "Bank Account" or something to avoid confusion. I'm assuming all sorts of things about the language being English, but I'm sure these ...


0

I see this sort of design a lot, and frankly I find it annoying. I think it can be tidied up quite easily though. These would be my steps: Get rid of the empty grey space between each portion, maybe leave a tiny line. Have each question except the top one collapsed, so you can only see the question but not the answer options. Once the data is filled in the ...


1

I suggest you don't leave it blank and use in clear writing "Choose one" for the default option. Then, add an option (at the top of the dropdown) for "Don't use indice". This leaves no room for ambiguity: If the user simply encounters a blank dropdown, or "-----," they may think they have to select one of the options, which may not be true. Instead, ...


7

Assuming the site is translated through a translation engine (which is very much prone to error) instead of properly translated and localized (see this for starters), using the wrong gender for "any (shape)" or "any (size)" is a relatively minor problem. But let's just assume so and come up with a possible solution. Is it unreasonable to have the first ...


2

The problem is that when translated, for languages that have genre, the translation is different depending on the genre of the category, and it's difficult for the translation engine to provide an accurate translation. Given problem can be solved by using variable value based on language being used by an application. Here is how android multi language apps ...


-2

mathematicians use ∀ to mean "for all" You could also use ∅ (empty) implying "no filter applied)


-3

*.* But you have to be old to understand that one...


24

I think the closest thing to a universal symbol would simply be *, which is used as a wildcard character in many operating systems and applications. It might not be recognized by every end user, but it is certainly more understandable than what you have now. There is also the option of leaving the field blank, implying no filter will be applied.


48

If you're trying to convey "this criteria doesn't matter", simply leaving it blank is probably the best option. This used to be a very common pattern in "advanced" search dialogs, until application designers collectively decided that fancy search options were not something users needed.


9

I assume there is no universal accepted symbol for "All". So, I would either return to text or use a slider like the price sliders on e-commerce websites or have the options shown as a list with checkbox depending on how many options you have on that element but avoid using a symbol as random as - star -


23

I'll start by saying this will probably be an unpopular opinion because, for reasons I can't comprehend, what you've done is done a lot. My complaint is that you've made 5 text fields and 3 multiple choice questions around 2800 pixels tall. "In reality you'd scroll the page" I swear in a decade we'll all have 8k monitors and still be endlessly scrolling ...


3

Great answers so far! I would just like to add a few points: Check those tiny grammar details: Instead of 'Lets' > 'Let's', instead of 'Create A New Task' > 'Create a new task' or 'Create a new Task' it is not a big deal but those small details could matter for some users who would not take your form too seriously. As your site gets bigger those mistakes ...


2

+1 what the previous answers said, I'd also like to add a little note about the consistency of the selections. In the "how should we notify you" section, deselected elements are grey. If that's the intended effect, that should be consistent with the rest of the selections as well.


7

I agree mostly with what @Steve O'Connor has said, but there are two things I think we can discuss further: Hint text should be useful. Meaning that if you're going to use it, write examples instead, like: "e.g. john@smith.com" in the email field. Hint texts are extremely helpful especially when the field itself doesn't exactly explain what should be ...


26

I feel you might be coming at this from the wrong angle. A form shouldn't excite you (or a user), it should get the job done quickly and painlessly. Boring can sometimes (usually!) be best. You mention that this form can be accessed on mobile - can we see that? There are some issues with your form that I can see from the screenshot, many of which are ...


0

A views counter could make the users feel like they are being watched - for some people that might be an uncomfortable experience. They are being watched, but you don't have to show that to them.


9

A page counter only shows how popular the page is, not how popular the recipe is. If people tend to go to pages that are viewed more than others, but the recipe itself isn't liked very much, the page still gets popular. This can kill the whole concept when people don't trust the numbers anymore. So the amount of page visits are useless without a score, ...


12

Read more about Social Proof. Maybe instead of showing the views you go with Rating, upvotes. I would assume in recipes people are interested if people tried the recipe and succeded. https://www.nngroup.com/articles/social-proof-ux/


2

oh you have stumbled upon a bit of a rabbit hole there! This is a (as far as I am aware only proposed) method to allow interfaces to be simplified and or adapted for people using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices and or software. If you have ever implemented schema.org or microformats as part of SEO efforts this concept will be ...


2

It's not consistent, and consistency is often mentioned as one of the key points in UX design (e.g. here). You don't want your users to think that they ended up on another site, unless they did; compare e.g. the dark navigation bar of this site: with the light one of Stack Overflow:


0

I would like to show two different approaches from known companies. Nike In their landing page we can see the different categories in the top. Once the user hover on one of them we can see then the subcategories displayed. Please see that with one hover they are displaying all the sub subcategories. That's very good, from an user perspective, because they ...


1

Agreed with @It's Dylan, this is not a UX Design question. But here you go, most places seeking UX/ UI Designers want to see your portfolio of work. Here are some suggestions: With a CSE Experience, one place to position yourself strongly would be to code your own website showcasing your work. Structure your projects in such a way that showcases your ...


0

This isn't really a UX question, any decent answer could essentially apply to job hunting in general. Expand your network, setup a blog/portfolio/website to help yourself standout, find the companies you're interested in working for and learn about their business proactively. You are in luck though I have some UX resources for you. The folks at Las Vegas ...


1

I see this sometimes on single-page applications (e.g. portfolios, small businesses) with a horizontal menu that scrolls to the part of the content when you click the corresponding menu item. I usually find it a bit of a waste because the pages seem to be short and I have to click all menu items to see if there is some content that is not on the page (e.g. a ...


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