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2

Submit it is the most important button in your form, so you can make it full width on the second row. The other buttons can have 50% width, on the first row. You can check this approach in the Material Design Guidelines:


1

I would omit the declarative yes/no step before address entry. It is unnecessary and can actually be a bit annoying, unless some technical, legal, or regulatory constraint compels your application to prefix the address entry fields with an explicit 'do-you-actually-want-to-do-this' type question. This could be analogous to a legally binding declaration of ...


1

You could add a dropdown button with both actions instead of two separated buttons. For example:


1

You can remove "Cancel" button. Being a smaller ui on mobile, users can spot close (X) button for the same action.


0

The conventional feature that comes to mind immediately to support the functions you describe is user profile. Conventionality means recognition and familiarity. Presumably an accounting application has security features that require secure log-in and authentication, as well as security timeout etc. Offer the distinction between business and individual ...


2

Daniel, I agree with Joao's layout suggestion, because it places related options closer together (think "Gestalt Law of Proximity"), so the perception of grouping is stronger. The vertical layout also make it easier to scan the options' labels, particularly if the lengths of the labels differs quite a bit. As for the tooltips, I ran into a similar issue in ...


2

This is a focused task and the key to entering access to the content. Some choose to show some content to pull the user in, but lowering the cognitive load is important to a focused task. Some choose to hide all content because it should not be viewed without privileges. If you go with the first approach, deciding how far to lower ithe cognitive load ...


1

I would choose something dynamic like a social network feed in a column: Image source imgerton.pw/jquery-social-feed-plugin


1

If at the moment the product has no plans or iteration of development for the next functionalities, you can move the middle section more to the left and in the future develop functionalities depending on the user's needs Spotify used this space to present main menu The Stackexchange right column contains links to the album of topics of interest to users ...


2

In order to minimize the number of stimuli - at the moment when less information reaches us, we are able to focus on the goal. Exactly the same with, for example, shopping processes to reduce the page drop rate during the process. It's correlate with reducing memory load: App has a clear structure “Recognition over recall” Implicit help Visual aids


4

Your concerns are valid, I'll highly recommend including the month. Some reasons: Users need just a brief moment of distraction to forget what they are thinking and as a industry rule it's better to avoid making them think and recheck unnecessarily. There's not an easy way to deduce in what month we are based just on a day or its number. To avoid the ...


1

I like the clarity you show in the bottom picture, but that’s only my opinion... All to easy for some users to make an error with months... lots of checks are written with the wrong month as it changes...


3

This is one of the reasons some designers prefer to use the mobile first approach, as it forces you to fit everything you design in the tiny screen estate you do have. If you start with desktop, you may end up with something that cannot be scaled down. Your table for example is OK for desktop, but far too information heavy for mobile. You could go back to ...


0

You should embrace the limitations of the device; mobile phones have screens that are narrow and tall. Adapt your layout to fit it. Instead of having the name and email side by side put them under each other, check this quick mockup (ignore the proportions). It's similar enough (same elements visible simultaneously in the screen) that users won't be ...


1

I have faced the debate, this is my conclusion thus far. Slide Out vs Modal In an application, it is important to make the distinction between information that requires immediate attention/action and those that do not but need to be in context. Slide Out Helps keep a consistent design by size/height vs a modal that could have various width and height ...


1

Here is my suggestion: Instead of checkboxes, use toggles since the user is "activating/deactivating" a functionality and for the help icon, show it when the user is hovering an option. The fact that all options are vertically aligned it helps the toggles to be aligned to the left and the text readable from top to bottom.


1

The question mark with the black balloon icon is suitable for isolated situations, but when a full text has a tooltip icon for each option it's something totally unnecessary besides being a redundant visual noise. The help info can appear simply when hovering the text without any extra icon. See this example


1

I do not have an example, but some thoughts about such a toggle: If you use a WCAG 2.0 conform contrast in the first place the toggle wouldn't be necessary. And there are more benefits in that: the readability of your site will be enhanced for all users. Having a toggle might make some user feel handicapped because they need to change the settings of the ...


0

I saw this the other day that is super helpful. It has really nice combinations of colours with strong accessibility grades. http://clrs.cc/a11y/ I also use this tool: https://color.review/


3

Website References: https://www.choicehotels.com/ https://www.dunkindonuts.com https://www.saudia.com/ I think this is part of WCAG 2.0 requirement to provide minimum contrast ratio guidelines. Success criterion 1.4.3 and 1.4.6 mentions providing a style switcher to high contrast for the users with visual impairments. More info can be found here: https://...


0

I would agree with Fylgge and say that the page should be named for it's overarching purpose. "About Me", "My Demographics", "My Data". People won't be too confused if you present it as an amalgam of information being gathered. Just make sure that you have clear headers for each individual section, so the user knows what is being asked of them at every ...


1

How to name a page? Here's a technique to try: Ask yourself two questions: (1) Why are we making users do these things? (2) Why are they all on the same screen? Answer the questions aloud. Talk to one of your colleagues about it. Ask them the same questions. Get conversational. Say a lot about it. Jot down the significant words you use in your answers. ...


2

Maybe the name should describe what the task is about. Something like 'Tell us about you ...' or 'Before we start ...'.


0

Maybe you could rename the online account "My Account" to "Profile".


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