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1

Your users will not want to navigate to the page just to find out what the title is. If I saw "Practical En...", I would not know what that page is. I'd rather have more space dedicated to navigation so I could read the full titles. There are many patterns for navigation out there and can be found with some web searches, but they can vary greatly ...


0

IMO: Title belongs more in the right content part above product listing. (As it is describing those products in general, and not only their characteristics / filters left in sidebar). "Delete all filters" should be moved left to filter items, as last item. And renamed shorter "Clear all" i.e. Red color signalizes warning, green is more appropriate for ...


0

I would put the title aligned with the products and on the sidebar filter I would show on top another filter that shows Iluminaticao LED and his children with the Lampadas checked. I hope this makes sense. If you wish I can make a sketch fast.


1

Based on the responses here, I developed confidence to mix languages. As my final solution, I placed a big badge in German language on my simple and lean landing page with an about me text in English language. Furthermore, I used a German flag/heart icon to indicate, that the mix of languages is by intent. This way I'm able to mix languages even in the ...


0

I am unclear about how and why the unique id fields have the same values. But regardless, the following way of representation solves your case. We can use chips for the values in the columns.


0

Design principle: Organizing information https://uxplanet.org/design-principle-organizing-information-343a7ef936a8 UX Design Guidelines For Content Heavy UI https://theuxblog.com/blog/design-guidelines-for-content-heavy-ui How to strategically plan for data-heavy UX design https://getflywheel.com/layout/plan-data-heavy-ux-design-how-to/


1

"It depends" is probably the correct answer. Is the old site inaccurate or misleading? take it down. Is the old site ok, but just undergoing a redsign, keep it up. If you provide some more context as to why you are redesigning, the validity of the old site, the timescales, the traffic, the impact on the business of not having a site etc then a more ...


0

An interesting question, my 2c coming from a developer but UX lead and also having designed interfaces with several internal scrollable areas. A few points: Visible scrollbars should exist if the content is large enough to require a scroll, as the presence of a scrollbar signifies and affords that the content can be scrolled. Infinite scroll is my ...


0

You have to make a coming soon page. If you create coming soon page then it will not affect your website SEO which was done previously. If you didn't work on SEO for your old website then you can skip coming soon page design. also from a user experience perspective, when a visitor visits your website then they will know that something will come. If the ...


1

A very interesting read from https://www.nngroup.com about notifications, indicators and validations. In interaction design, a system should always keep users informed, by providing appropriate feedback. Ensuring that the state of the system is always visible is one of the 10 usability heuristics for interface design. (https://www.nngroup.com/...


0

stacking toast notifications seem fine to me. actually toast are temporary UI elements which go away after a little delay (between 3 and 6 seconds usually). so stacking them is not a big distraction for users.


0

1.In a modern, ideally programmed system, filters should work dynamically in real time - however, due to system limitations: For a card with saved settings: a) Let's assume that we search for the target element by the X Y Z parameters b) We want to see the results so click apply.(the card closes automatically and we see the result) c) We see 30 results, ...


0

I am not aware of any studies, but below is my personal experience why sidebars should be rarely used if you target desktops. Sidebars scale badly on large or ultrawide screens, unless you fill the whole screen. Even two sidebars on a 32" 16:9 screen leave a lot of empty space. I've seen websites where there is 10 centimeters of empty space between sidebar ...


0

I've included an alternate design that shows all course options by default, but may help to remove decision fatigue and page weight by minimizing the "select" buttons. Here, a user would need to select a course first, then in a modal choose which specific class. I think it degrades to a mobile view well too. Hope this helps! Desktop: Mobile:


0

The reference to the "holy grail" isn't because of the layout being the best possible design, but because this was a very popular layout that was very difficult to implement using CSS only techniques. As Wikipedia puts it: It is commonly desired and implemented, but for many years, the various ways in which it could be implemented with the current ...


24

The proximity principle used as a frame works correctly when there are at least two or three elements generating the container virtual limits: It works more as a closure law: Or the content has a central visual axis strong enough to lead to interpret it as a single element: Following this, the top text is perfect because there are four delimiting elements ...


3

I never saw a rule for it and I believe is very difficult to create a rule for it because depends on the design, the fonts, the colours and the type information that you are showing there. For example: If you just have graphics with no legend, spaces should be enough to separate If you just have tables they will auto separate because of design but if your ...


0

I wouldn't bet by a 'Holy grail' of design. Design will always have tips and best practices but every year, every case, every user, evolves with the time and with their needs. It's important to stay updated and have different references :)


2

It could be because, back in 2001 when Rob Chandanais of BlueRobot came up with the pure CSS version of this layout, our monitors were much smaller and resolution wasn't as high. Websites had an infinite amount of vertical space, unless you wanted horizontal scrolling. Therefore you could have a lot more navigational items in the menu. Also, it was arguably ...


0

Like most things, it depends on the context. Did the user submit a form? Create a project? Make a payment? Each of these options have their own patterns that work well for each use case. From past experience and user tests, modals with loading indicators increased perceived wait time and frankly, they just feel clunky and inelegant. The idea is you want to ...


0

In short, no. I'm answering this in general and not to your specific example. Consistency is a key aspect in making an interface predictable and easy to use. Moving elements around on the page can result in confused users, therefore typically you should aim to keep key functions in the same places. Your example clearly illustrates this. However in some ...


0

Considering this is a landing page and the conversion rate is important and for it, you should show the CTA buttons instead of hiding them inside an accordion I will suggest to you 2 alternatives. 1) Showing all in open boxes and highlighting the most important. 2) My favourite because: Too many options = more choice = easy to take no choice (and leave) ...


5

I would encourage including the article: not for SEO, only partially for grammar, but to increase accessibility .... if it's a mouse-based user-base or mobile app where finger-actions are most important. Larger targets are easier to click. However, for screen-readers, I would encourage not only not omitting the article, but (when possible) allow links to ...


0

Some tips: You could use the F pattern (Arrange the information from left to right in the upper lines and then less information on the next lines)To not make it pop too much simply use the colors of your brand. You should get one contrast color from there. Also, I felt a little bit lost in your page, right now you have two buttons that fight too much with ...


92

In carefully edited text, the choice to include the article depends on the meaning. Examples: I saw a newt yesterday, dark with blue spots. Can anybody help identify it? — Article not included: the reader guesses that the linked page is about newts in general. I saw a newt yesterday, dark with blue spots. Can anybody help identify it? —Article ...


19

Usually an article need not be a part of your link. Except in the cases when it makes a difference in meaning. Usually it will be a definite article, like "The Times", "El Salvador", "Al Jazeera". Sometimes you can see Portugal city Porto spelled as O Porto. This is because porto means just "port" in Portuguese, so the city is not just Port, but "The Port"....


8

As the search bots don't give importance for this stop words (the, a, an...) you don't need to hyperlink them. What's Stop Words on Wikipedia: In computing, stop words are words which are filtered out before processing of natural language data (text). Stop words are generally the most common words in a language; there is no single universal list of stop ...


0

Normally, I start answering: Do I use a limited max-width container or full-width responsive container? Why this matter? Because in e-commerce for big screens (over 1600px) I can keep reorganizing element to fill the whole screen showing 5 or 6 columns of products. And in this case, I will need to design a wireframe/mockup for 4 sizes of screens and not for ...


1

I recently built a tool that automatically checks contrast of links and buttons of websites. There are some useful things that I think are different and quite useful: It calculates non-text contrast (the contrast of the button background with adjacent colors) --> minimum 3:1 It also takes :hover and :focus states in consideration.


1

Yes, there is a rule of thumb applied when placing most the interaction heavy CTA into the bottom bar or in the lower half of the phone. As they the easiest and most accessible area for the mobile. For Example, Uber, lift, google maps or other apps have their most interactive CTA in the lower area. Here an image for better understanding the interactive ...


0

Never heard or seen 3 way toggle, but maybe it is just semantic of the word. Answer depends on the specifics of filter facets. If it is just a bunch of yes/nos and they are not mutually exclusive then definitely go for for checkboxes. Ticked box means that criteria should be met. Unticked means - I do not care about this. Restrictions [] 18+ [] Women only ...


1

Toggles can only be two way also they are tricky. I think what you looking for is a group button. It is way more intuitive than toggle (it clearly show what is selected, and are labeled), however group buttons require more space than toggle. I will do it this way:


1

Everything depends of the user expectation. When more and more companies doing it, more people will know that the lik is on the bottom. But take care! In an e-commerce, no problem, people are looking for pproducts and not about us. After decided which product will buy and which store the user will buy, they will search for about page if they think it's ...


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