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Certainly seems misleading to me. We highlight the interactive element when hovered by a pointer to provide visual feedback as to what the user is trying to interact with. Highlighting the entire card seems to imply the entire card will be activated as a single element.


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I'm a bit late here... but those sound like filters to me! Zillow does a really good job of this, allowing you to filter homes by bedrooms (eg. 2 or more), price (eg. $1000-$1500), or many other items. You may even have slightly different specific patterns for each category. Again you can check out how Zillow treats specifying beds with a different ...


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bbc.com/.co.uk is a major website with a collapsible header nav section - triggered by a section of the main nav labelled "More v". The main nav also overflows into that section when used on smaller screens, but several of the links are always in there. The main nav / collapsible section is common across the entire site, pushing the content of the ...


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I found the hover (mouseover) degrades in responsive design. Only screen types using a pointer device can trigger the hover leaving tablets and phones impotent. For example: I coded a wonderful CSS hover event on a vertical menu which triggered border/background. Wasted on tablets and phones 😞 Emphasize homogeneous site design, as important as logo/color/...


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For horizontal navigation, submenus that appear on hover are something known. If a collapsible section replacing this and it is properly signalized, it seems ok to me, because on mobile accordions will be used anyway, but hiding title and breadcrumbs is not a good idea at all.


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I think this would be related to an accordion with horizontal behavior. My 2¢


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I'd like to offer another suggestion: Use indented tree, but let the user customize the indentation level, and allow them to set the visual cue for it. For example: The following leftmost tree doesn't fit the screen boundaries. Hence, the user shifts it once (middle tree) then again (rightmost tree), using different colors (which can be set by the user) to ...


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It's been a few years since this question was asked. The pattern that seems to be currently in use in enterprise apps is to let the user land on a default (let's say it's the selected photos), and then use the first couple of items in the gallery view to let the user switch to taking their own picture, or selecting from their photo library. This minimizes ...


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