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I haven't seen this used much, but like others have said. It sounds like a terrible user experience. But what if timeouts were added? For instance, you hover over a menu item and keep your cursor there for 1, 2, 3, 4... seconds. Does that change things? I think it does. More time added would reduce the annoyingness of this UX. But at the same time, if you ...


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The design principle is that it should behave the way the user expects. Of course this depends on your user and where they are coming from, and it depends how often they use the app and how they learn to use it. Having some magic capability that's invoked by swiping from the top right corner of the screen is fine if people are using it so often that it's ...


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There are two types of hierarchy patterns: Z Pattern - This pattern is best used for content that is not text or content-heavy. Gif credit Apple F Pattern - The F pattern for viewing is more prominently used on text-heavy pages such as articles and blog posts. Gif credit The Verge Your design best fits in Z pattern. But you are not following ...


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Forms are always tricky! BUT I found this article https://www.nngroup.com/articles/required-fields/ and it says you should always mark (minimum) the required fields AND the optional fields before submitting a form. This means in my opinion that you should show in your first and second screen, what the user needs to do all the time. A hint like Danielillo ...


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I understand the question is like about the difference between required step and required field inside a step and trying to find a single rendering mode. Half the question is about how each step works and then the problem. I think both things can be simplified by unifying explanation and alert and switching from one to the other when needed. The main window ...


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You are trying to use an inline validation (which is great, but may not necessarily apply for your specific case). What I recommend you to do is to separate your problem into parts: 1: Users are pressing the button "Next" without filling the required field Possible solution: Just disable the "Next" Button and add a message that says ...


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It's important that simply moving the mouse never changes any state. If the user wants to change anything, clicking should be the absolute least action that does so. (Bear in mind that it may be the user's cat or infant child playing with the mouse! ) With that proviso, as a means of allowing a user to explore the menu, I don't dislike it. I would think of ...


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Domain buying websites have had this add on functionality for years and could help you identify a reusable pattern that applies to your scenario. Your design doesn't seem wrong ( considering we do not know the exact items and their addons )


3

This violates the principle of least astonishment fairly significantly. Hover events fire regardless of whether a browser window has focus. You can test this by opening another program and while that program has focus, hover the mouse cursor over a hyperlink in your browser and watch your cursor change. If my mouse cursor turns into a pointy finger when it ...


1

The same design considerations apply to smart watches/wearables as it does to other devices/viewports. You need to take into account of physical limitations (i.e. screen size) and the information that need to be displayed (and therefore how the user will interact with it) but most importantly what the actual problem that needs to be solved for the user (i.e. ...


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I think one potential solution is not to separate the input process for the products and the add-ons, but rather combine them either in the input or the review stage so that the user actions are reflected immediately rather than waiting until the review/summary of the checkout process. You can browse for examples on e-commerce sites where a product is ...


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Having content-obscuring changes happen at all on "hover" is an accessibility bug, so this is a non-starter. Not only may it be difficult or impossible for users with particular accessibility assistance devices to discover or trigger the hover behavior. It can also limit accessibility for: users who do not use assistance tech but who have ...


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This is annoying. Ignore any hypotheticals we can't judge in the gif. There's still an enormous usability problem. There are a lot of buttons and whatnot at the top of the browser (or even above that on some setups) and trying to access them isn't an indication that the user wants to go to a different tab on the website. For example, you might want to go ...


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This seems full of usability issues, as well as possibly performance issues loading interim unnecessary pages (e.g., user moves mouse across tabs to access one several over). To start, if there's user interaction within the tabs, even as simple as selecting a filtered option, are these changes preserved when tabs are swapped? Is there some reason swapping ...


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I think it's a derivative of the mega menus hovering effect where it's a fairly common pattern: What is different in the example of the question is that each menu has vertical submenus and this makes it a bit unpredictable because of the unusual, although it would be necessary to see how the effect continues on the page. Mailchimp.com use exactly the same ...


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I'm curious what are the websites where you have seen this pattern emerge. To my knowledge this is not common. I'd see this is unexpected and likely problematic. Imagine for instance if a user performs some actions partially, like filling a form, then moves the mouse above to switch to another tab on their browser and accidentally hovers over the navigation, ...


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