New answers tagged

2

Here is a previous post about it with some more points of consideration - Is it a "Natural language" form a good practice? Can be very hard to deal with the lot of culture and languages. Harder to design help and error message It's hard to represent optional inputs, because it leads to empty sentences Can be hard to parse fast by the user Not good ...


2

Natural language forms are much suited in short queries. Like i would like to book a ticket to "Choose Destination" on "Choose Date". These are much intuitive and direct. You can check out Luke's post on mad-libs form to learn more. But when it comes to long forms, it can increase the load on the user. Standard forms are lot easier when ...


-2

Neither. A modal is the ultimate UX fail. As soon as you have one, there are no questions of what's better, only what's infinitessimally less awful.


0

It is always better to have least actions for Users. Generally, more clicks means less user friendly. So, No pop ups please. In your case, it is better to have (HELP) option or intuitivetext on tooltip of (i) icon placed beside question displaying some description of question or some sample answers which guides user to enter particular data you want from ...


1

The existing answers cover most points well; I'll expand the problem to consider whether or not the dialog's size will depend on the data returned (as well as mentioning a pet-peeve about meaningless spinners). Statically-Sized Dialog If the size (and final position) of the dialog is known/calculated at the point of clicking, and will not depend on the ...


7

If the global layout of the data is highly predictable, then the current trend would be to open the dialog immediately, and populate it with "mock" data, which is not data at all, just grey blocks where the data is going to be. Apparently (just learned that), it has a name: skeleton screens. This is used a lot by Facebook, Linkedin, Youtube, and ...


14

Your app will have a more polished feel by intentionally avoiding the amount of elements quickly flashing or jumping around on the page. A loading indicator isn't needed if the data is returned in 1–3 100ths of a second. Even 10 times slower (0.1 seconds) still feels pretty instantaneous. Quickly showing and hiding elements like that is not necessary or ...


56

The first option... but with more feedback. You should have the modal appear immediately. This is important so that the user knows that their action has been successful (i.e. you don't want them to keep clicking because they think nothing is happening). However, having a blank modal is not good. Because the user will be confused as to why it is empty (even ...


0

Typically when there's a chance that information may have been interpreted incorrectly by an automated system, the user should have an opportunity to easily view the original text from which the 'facts' were sourced. You see this in automatic translation systems (see google web page translation below), where not only is the original text displayed, but the ...


0

It is not uncommon for one to put a question mark in parenthesis at the end of a statement to indicate that it may not be correct. At least in American English. One might say for example, "I think this is the right approach(?)" when they are both stating this as a fact, yet also questioning it at the same time. So for your example, the results ...


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