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If the user is more experienced, You can implement shortcuts for changing the order of objects. It's friendly and fast solution. The window can also be opened by right clicking Another commonly using option is previously mentioned layers.


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It's about research or experiment? Research: In this phase i think it's necessarily prepare suitable set of question and carry out quality tests with users. Definition of methodological goals, helps you meet process, concerns a hardship and satisfaction points. On the basis of the information received, you can map the process and determine the points in ...


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A layers palette is the most commonly used, I would suggest, the only anomaly I've come across, bizarrely, is Balsamiq, which favours a right-click and locking of objects.


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Consider marking only the files that need user attention. Having icons for the good, bad, and indifferent can clutter up the report and make it hard for the user to find the information that is important to them. If files that are good or not required do not need any user action, they may not need an icon. That would draw more attention to the bad files (...


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They are trying to use you. Free work disguised as interview test.


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You could replace the radio buttons by check boxes as well. This would give your users the desired ability and enable them to select more than one class. If finally no users were selected, then the Post button should be inactive.


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From the look of it, the exercise is definitely excessive and the expectation is unreasonable and unprofessional. 15 screens including rework on wireframes to high fidelity screens should take weeks if not months, depending on the details. No designer will begin working on high fidelity without getting the wireframes approved first. I would suggest you take ...


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OH! I should also note that by adding a QR code to your print material, you can actually build in metrics you wouldn't otherwise have. Since it uses a URL you can track all sorts of information (user location, device, number of scans, user pathways - all the usual). Another important reason why you want to put practices in place that will incentive your ...


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I kind of agree with Mo'ath but I think he has missed a bit. In the question, you state the folders may contain hundreds of files, therefore I think it is imperative to try and inform the user the consequence of deleting that folder, as such I think this is clearer about the consequence of the action.


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I think you should provide multiple options that people are likely to have, and let them choose. That might include: URL (if it's dead easy to remember/type) App name (so they can search for it in an app store) QR code Twitter handle for the app or your shop (then a link in your bio) Aim for flexibility without too many options - three is probably enough. ...


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Just yesterday I used a new Amazon feature where I bring an unpackaged item to be returned to the UPS Store, show them a QR code, and be on my merry way. It was incredible. I'm seeing more and more QR codes finally make their way into the consumer space. I would say it's a pattern that is gaining popularity and that more "civilian" users will continue to ...


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Definitely I would go with QR Code. But I will also show them icon and name of the app; and a website. On website you could have a link for ios/android app. The people who use QR code will find it painless to scan and reach the intended app whereas its a hassle to go to website, or app store to install app, too many taps. Showing them icon boosts the user(...


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Also - you can customize / brand your QR codes to make them more visually intriguing – so long as you build in around 30% error correction. Here's a couple of examples one some I did (way back in the day).


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I've actually done a fair amount of work with QR codes in the past. It all depends on their implementation. If you simply slap a QR code on a poster - not so helpful. If it has a purpose and an incentive - people WILL scan them. They are widely popular in some countries. Basically - you've gotta give someone a reason to scan it.


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In the US and Western Europe it's not used much. The stats are actually quite dismal. I see very few applications generating interest in QR codes. Skiing and hiking trails where one doesn't need to take off ones gloves is a niche-market exception. On the other hand QR codes are really big in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea so if your market has a ...


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You should have a QR code, whether on screen or paper. It is important to note that both Android and iOS come with default QR readers. QR code is the easiest way to pass a URL. Unless your application is on the App Store, it will be difficult to get to the application download page without a QR code.


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TL;DR: Not that popular currently but might become so in the future. In your case I'd look for an additional option if possible. Edit: Because of RonJohn's comment and the many people who agreed, I decided to remake the charts in "true" form, so the numbers look less manipulative. Scanova.io cites a few surveys across the years and claims it's on the rise: ...


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Instantaneous animation aren't really possible, but they would be the best. The max length of delay between click and animation is 0.1s. Quote from Nillsen Norman study: "0.1 second is the response time limit if you want users to feel like their actions are directly causing something to happen on the screen. For example, if you click on an expandable ...


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The reason to have an animation is to give the user an immediate feedback on the interaction. This is the reason why there should be no delay to start the animation at all (as the others already stated). But: There might be an exception. You mentioned hover: It depends what the animation would be. Is it let's say a list and you just wont to point out on ...


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It depends on the components and elements. The main reason for using motion in components and elements in the user interface is suggesting action and making the events clear for the users, so your main action after deciding on using motion or not is answering two questions: First, is this recognized at all? and after that, is this annoying? to answer these ...


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There should be no delay at all. However if you are asking what should be duration of animation, the answer is "it depends" - in depth answer is here: https://uxdesign.cc/good-to-great-ui-animation-tips-7850805c12e5 My default is 0.25 sec. But this is not delay, this is duration. Delay is zero.


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My gold rule is 0.2 seconds. But it depends a lot on what type of animation you are using. For example, impactful fades can last a lot longer, and slide animations tend to be faster. Longer animations are less and less common, and I’m also seeing a trend of using no animations at all. I still like them when they prove to make the user experience better.


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