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There‘s no combobox element for the web and the definition of a combobox differs depending on who you ask. I would say a combobox is a mix of a text box and a select box. That is, you can select from a list of options like a select box but type in a value that's not in the list of options. If you‘re looking for this sort of thing then maybe you could ...


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I just stumbled over an article that presents a useful and usable solutions approach to your design problem, Swapna: check out section "4. Consider overflow scenarios and have designs ready for them," in this article by VMware Design. Displaying an indicator that there are more items in the field than appear in its viewport, and providing some kind of hover ...


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The only thing that could be considered a standard really is the question mark in a circle icon, as @Glorfindel mentioned. Apart from that, it's what fits well with the rest of your content and UI design. As long as people can see that something is interactive. Can I ask you to look into making them accessible? https://inclusive-components.design/tooltips-...


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Most applications/websites either have an icon (often a question mark) to indicate you can hover over it (but then the hover only works on the icon, not the label) or no special formatting at all. The answer here suggests using a dotted line as well; I vaguely remember old Windows (3.x) help files working the same way. Stack Exchange has a lot of labels / ...


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There's no repetitive action here, unless it is expected that the user will install many products in one visit. Having similar buttons do the same thing to different pieces of content may look ugly (I find that very subjective), but it's very easy to understand what the buttons do. You can get rid of repeating buttons but that forces you to divide the ...


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You are going to sacrifice consistency for repetition if you want to take this approach. The design pattern used is a series of card components in a full page grid layout, which requires each component to be replicated. If you remove the primary and secondary action, it will require creating another section on the page to process the user actions so you ...


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One way is to differentiate primary vs secondary buttons. You could keep “Install” as the prominent button and “Documentation” as the secondary link. Something like this:


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We were faced with this exact same problem. Our multi-select control behaves like yours, except for one detail: when the user clicks into the field, the menu immediately displays the full list of available options. We explored a number of design options, but agreed early on that we needed a straight-forward, easy-to-discover affordance to trigger the "...


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Can't we consider, if user has made no selection then he/she is intending all of them from dropdown? Many sites filters works in a same way. Users are already trained for using filters. Using the schemes that already exist we reduce cognitive load. If still want to make user think, How to show "Select all" option Try to keep 'select-all' option at the ...


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I think a great attention grabber is the pattern where the illustration goes out of the frame. it is a harder to implement but it looks great and it should work wonderfully with major announcements. Link: https://dribbble.com/shots/11298443-Finezjo-Dashboard


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Welcome to UX StackExchange @MACC. Try this: Select an element and tick the box "Fix position when scrolling" in the right tool pane. When creating a prototype in Figma you can define this element as an overlay to add a hover effect (see Figma blog for a detailed description).


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Photoshop and Blender are examples of advanced direct manipulation interfaces: the intention of direct manipulation is to allow a user to manipulate objects presented to them, using actions that correspond at least loosely to manipulation of physical objects. An example of direct manipulation is resizing a graphical shape, such as a rectangle, by ...


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This is a great question! I looked for these kind of interactions as well, and some search queries that correspond with good results include: onHover Animated Illustrations mouseOver Animated Illustrations CSS Hover Effect Illustrations Found a tutorial and examples of the same here: https://www.mockplus.com/blog/post/best-animated-websites


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UI Mascot ...repetitive tasks often struggle with retaining users: people abandon them because they feel bored, and boredom is simply lack of stimulation. By using positive stimuli like humor, movement, unique art, elements of game, and relatable characters we can make users feel a different way — more excited, less distracted, and ultimately happier. ...


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There is a word in german for it (for this very specific purpose in graphic design): "Störer". Which I have seen translated to eye-catcher. The purpose is simply disruptive marketing, interrupting your natural scanning of the content. Personal anecdote: Marketing managers absolutely love it, because it's hard to look away. But be aware, over-use deter ...


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Agreed with @It's Dylan, this is not a UX Design question. But here you go, most places seeking UX/ UI Designers want to see your portfolio of work. Here are some suggestions: With a CSE Experience, one place to position yourself strongly would be to code your own website showcasing your work. Structure your projects in such a way that showcases your ...


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This isn't really a UX question, any decent answer could essentially apply to job hunting in general. Expand your network, setup a blog/portfolio/website to help yourself standout, find the companies you're interested in working for and learn about their business proactively. You are in luck though I have some UX resources for you. The folks at Las Vegas ...


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