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So, drawing inspiration from James Coyle's and ADOConnection's ideas, I gave it multiple attempts and wanted to share my thoughts. First, this is how I initially planned it: Second, James' corner FAB. Not too sure about the color style yet, but since I wanted it to not be too prominent (since the options aren't that important) I couldn't use my accent ...


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On Android, the arrow at the top left (or right if in RTL mode) of the screen is not a back button, rather it is an Up button (typically known as the Up affordance). It should work differently to the Back button (which should always be available either as a hardware button or software button provided by the OS). To achieve your desired effect while obeying ...


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From the info you provided I see correlation with mobile games UI: custom-made home screen with few primary actions and some secondary actions custom-made navigation I think you can grab the same idea. Even if your UI is not that heavily drawn and does not look like cartoon frame, this pattern still applies and you dont need to use common navigation ...


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I'm not sure why you would not want "to use one of the common navigation patterns" - users are familiar with them, they don't need to think about how they work, and they will feel in control of your app when the app behaves as the users expect them to do. Would you buy a car where the car designer had decided she didn't want "to be forced to use one of the ...


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I may have missed something, but if you’re thinking of using the space to pull up the sheet, why not just stick to the common navigation pattern that users are familiar with? If the main stage content of the app is sufficiently engaging, users won’t mind the presence of a UI element they have become accustomed to consuming precious pixels lol. Best of luck!


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Material design has a bottom navigation drawer: I would combine this with a corner floating action button to reveal it:


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You could use an ellipse button like this: It means the links are more contextual when placed with the second portion of content, if I understand the problem correctly anyway. It also acts as a secondary level CTA as you mentioned they are "less" important pages.


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In terms of User expectations, when entering into and using any Android app Users will likely expect to be able to access important information quickly and easily. It is unclear how Users will navigate between your two main pieces of content, but it seems that by pressing the More... button the Bottom Sheet will be displayed offering navigational menu items....


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Possible options: Tapping/clicking anywhere on the image to enlarge and have smaller navigation buttons that allow users to navigate left or right Tapping/clicking anywhere on the image to navigate left or right and have a smaller enlarge button somewhere on the image that allows users to enlarge the image On mobile, consider having a one time only hint ...


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Short Answer The principles for displaying hidden content that you describe work for both a dropdown and for a menu. If you implement all of the same accessibility features for the toggle part (not the content of the 'dropdown' / 'menu' content) then you should have a pretty good accessible menu. Long Answer / Things to consider Without seeing the code ...


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I had a similar problem with my design. I solve it like this It require more space, but it also minimize cognitive load and number of clicks. However there is nothing else on this subpage. Only the table and the filters for creating the table. This way proximity is not a problem here.


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One may add as many as content or features to site, but what matters is that the content or features you provided are really needed in the first place or not. So we can try to reduce that content and then segregation of that content so we can assign a tab to each part. we can try to reduce scroll as the content we are going to have can be read in a non-...


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