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Your users will not want to navigate to the page just to find out what the title is. If I saw "Practical En...", I would not know what that page is. I'd rather have more space dedicated to navigation so I could read the full titles. There are many patterns for navigation out there and can be found with some web searches, but they can vary greatly ...


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I would say that in principle, and without having seen the details, I would go for OPT 2 but making sure there is a good visual indication of sense of place (e.g. breadcrumbs) so the user doesn't get lost in the deep hierarchy. My reasoning is that it should be easier to make several choices from between a few items each than fewer choices but between many ...


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It`s hard to come with an answer with the lack of details but here are the factors to consider. What are the 8 categories in OPT 1 and what are the 3 categories in OPT 2 and how did you decide upon ? For example in an ecommerce when deciding on categories we could put a broad category Electronics that includes PC and TV or we could create two ...


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Option 1: Keep only Login in the4 navbar A common pattern that is used across the board is the use of only the Login CTA in the nav bar. Once in the login screen, the user is given the option to Sign Up or Register if they didn't have an account. Example: Option 2: Keep both, but don't make them buttons Keep both the Login and the Sign Up in the nav bar ...


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I am not aware of any studies, but below is my personal experience why sidebars should be rarely used if you target desktops. Sidebars scale badly on large or ultrawide screens, unless you fill the whole screen. Even two sidebars on a 32" 16:9 screen leave a lot of empty space. I've seen websites where there is 10 centimeters of empty space between sidebar ...


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The accordion menu expands its height for navigation through the levels. As your space has more height than width, it may be a good idea to use it, especially if you aim to not expand beyond the designated space. Here is a good example of a 3 level depth accordion Dropdown menus can have different configurations, however, they always visually expand beyond ...


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Yes, there is a rule of thumb applied when placing most the interaction heavy CTA into the bottom bar or in the lower half of the phone. As they the easiest and most accessible area for the mobile. For Example, Uber, lift, google maps or other apps have their most interactive CTA in the lower area. Here an image for better understanding the interactive ...


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Everything depends of the user expectation. When more and more companies doing it, more people will know that the lik is on the bottom. But take care! In an e-commerce, no problem, people are looking for pproducts and not about us. After decided which product will buy and which store the user will buy, they will search for about page if they think it's ...


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The way you have designed and defined the use case for 'cards' seem to indicate that they are purely navigational components that don't provide any additional information to the user. The best way to move away from detailed design upfront and take into consideration the overall information architecture of your site/application is to understand the ...


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