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Borrow the browser history paradigm—these movements take the user "back" and "forward" in time. Most Recently Used tabs ("MRU", as you say) represent the users' viewing history, sorted by most recently visited. In a web browser (or file explorer, or ...), a user can navigate back in time, or forward to catch back up to where ...


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2nd Option. This version of navigation is more self-explanatory to a new user. Even if you go with the first option, when the product scales and menu items increases, you will have to fall back to the 2nd option as it has better grouping and saves valuable real estate.


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I think the 2nd option would be a better layout because fundamentally we should group buttons for the same purposes together. What you have on 1st option is clean but it's difficult for users to differentiate between what FreeMedia/ Edmoton buttons do, despite having the drop down arrow. The drop down arrow is a visual cue that will confuse users on the ...


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When I worked at a large streaming media and broadcast TV company, we required having a peek of the other options on side-scrolling menus so viewers would know the options were there. The psychology is slightly different when navigating a smart TV UI or using an AppleTV remote, but there was a drop-off in side-scrolling when the peek wasn't available. On ...


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you never take google as best UX or reference unless your working on something similar Browser project personally i prefer overflowing horizontal scroll specially on mobile projects based on my states and A/B testing 98% user think horizontal scroll is a swipe, mobile i prefer burger menu, or bottom fixed menu on the web project i have large menu i use to ...


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Personally I have started preferring bottom nav bars as screen sizes for mobile phones tend to increase. This is helpful for instant navigation and doesn't tire the user if he is using the app too much.


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That certainly depends on the how the information architecture is - categorization of information hierarchy. Bottom Navigation is mainly used to navigate between primary destinations in the app. From the above example, the primary navigational tasks - which the user will most often make - is to move between home, messages, and info. Bottom App bar, however, ...


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The Priority+ pattern is an option to deal with overflow of elements in place of a horizontal scroll. You'll see an example of this in sites with lots of top level (and also secondary categories). The Guardian UK is one example. They have potentially overflows at both levels. It looks like the Guardian has a couple of tradeoffs: because they have so many ...


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Although a bit older, this article mentions: Our research found that even strong cues such as arrows frequently remain unnoticed. People expect to scroll vertically for additional content, but they don’t expect to scroll sideways. Horizontal scrolling works against their preexisting mental model of a web page. If you must, always provide a visual cue. ...


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i don't advice you to do that it's a UX disaster users will be very confuser if you are willing to base on tab more likely use Burger Menu


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Well, there is a section about exactly this topic in the Material Guidelines: Caution Combining bottom navigation and tabs may cause confusion, as their relationship to the content may be unclear. Tabs share a common subject, whereas bottom navigation destinations are top-level and disconnected from each other. Basically it's simply about confusion. If you ...


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