New answers tagged

1

I would simplify it as much as possible. I would not use a pop up or modal on entry; that may annoy or drive away users. As you can read in this article, timing is everything when it comes to those tools. I would not start with a user profile, but if you expect a high return-rate for users, that is definitely the best way to welcome them back. Consider ...


0

I use UserZoom but they charge for Treetesting I think at about £10 per user. These online tools are fine but the thing you need to be very careful of - no matter which one you go for - is how to screen the right users for your test.


-1

you can try some online tools for A/B testing websites or try to make som online google forms. But after all you still need to validate only datas and metrics during using web not opinion of customers. I recommended you try tool as UXtweak. You can set online task-driven study get to know how peoples perform via your web. It is simple to set and you can get ...


0

Maybe you could use a little gamification. First, you have the user sign up only with the essential info, so that they don't leave the platform before having finished to sign up. Then, you can encourage them to complete the missing info after they created the account. Option A: give the user points for completing sections. This however makes sense only if ...


3

The less friction you can put in front a user who wants to register with your site, the better. If your onboarding process is too complex, you will lose users. I would get the user signed up with the absolute minimum of information necessary, then maybe on subsequent visits give them reminders to fill in the rest of the data. For example, "If you are not ...


1

If there's a concept of default product, have that selected (and moved to the top). Or, just have the first product selected. I don't see any viable reason for not having anything selected. Clicking on the product shouldn't enable/disable as it isn't clear what the checkbox does. I would refrain from using the exact same pattern as the browser because ...


1

My guess is it would have to do with usability. In the case of the apps using top navigation bar (which, by the way, is also a recommended navigation pattern for Android Apps), usability may be better off by having the "lesser used" actions far away from the user's thumb. By doing this, they free up the space for users to swipe or choose any of the more ...


0

You may find this a useful summary on the UX of content as such for starters: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/testing-content-websites/ Specific to testing user expectations of e-mail content, the Nielsen Norman Group have compiled a more in-depth study - albeit with focus on marketing - a PDF of which you can purchase for a fee: https://www.nngroup.com/...


0

This is what more formal usability testing is all about. You bring in users go through several displays; ascertain what they're expecting and searching for. Bear in mind that there will be significant legal restrictions about what you can and cannot display regarding financial information delivered via email. To answer your question directly: the best ...


0

I would recommend breaking the up the onboarding tasks and find a way to reward the user after each task i.e.; confirm that the sensor works. Break the steps down to the most important/necessary for optimal experience. It's better to have the user get it right the first time than having them go through the onboarding process a second time will definitely ...


0

I would create a prototype and test it myself, as it seems like you would benefit from talking to your potential users. Test the two types of flows or start with the one you think is best. I would test with about 4-5 people. This way you get insights into what your users know and how they perceive your app and they most likely provide feedback you would not ...


0

I believe this is a usability / privacy tradeoff scenario – where the most user-friendly option actually sacrifices a bit of privacy / security for your app as a whole. There's a more detailed answer on this article at Security Stackexchange, but I will try to summarize here: If you verify that an Email address is used for an account on your application, ...


1

I would argue that it's very hard to know how your audience will respond to your (somewhat involved) setup process. That being said, one of the versions you describe (the kind where each step in the process is on a single view, in sequential order), will give you feedback as to where users are struggling – either through in-person user testing, or via ...


0

Unfortunately for the user, I'd say that unless "ease of cancellation" is part of your selling / business proposition, you should stick to the existing models. A possible alternative is to make it relatively easy to see a cancelation button. However, when the user clicks it, they are prompted with an automated offer to continue their service for a discount. ...


0

It is a bad user experience, if one link can perform more than one action. Use two separate link for these two functions. Provide the possibility to join groups via both web and mobile applications. Then in the web application you would provide 2 links: one for joining groups and one for insralling the app. Allow joining groups via the app only. Then ...


0

"Join Group on APP." If they have the app, it opens and works. If they don't have the app, a popup will appear and say "Install APP to join group." Alternative, if you aren't getting the clicks: Primary button "Join Group on APP." Secondary/Text button "Don't have APP? Download here."


1

Considering demographic section, you must show every action on a seperate screen like a wizard. Because it's v v imp to get all things attached precisely to get correct results. Your app's main USP is to show correct measurements. imp - please show small gif instead of just plain text for every action. Whoever has selected to use this app won't mind going ...


3

I think you've got the right idea by only showing reviews if multiple reviews exist. I'd avoid allowing any written reviews, and stick to ratings (i.e. 5 Stars). Written reviews are likely to "give someone up" with accidental details. If you stick with this strategy, you've gotta find ways to get as many reviews in for a single worker - not an easy feat.


Top 50 recent answers are included