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X and Y can be taken as Horizontal and Vertical Alignment respectively. Alternatively, you may implement a preview with a dynamic example output. This will allow users to toy around and get an idea of what they want. I personally do not know what other options for X and Y really do besides "center", at (0,0), and I'd assume all other options are either ...


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I would agree with Fylgge and say that the page should be named for it's overarching purpose. "About Me", "My Demographics", "My Data". People won't be too confused if you present it as an amalgam of information being gathered. Just make sure that you have clear headers for each individual section, so the user knows what is being asked of them at every ...


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How to name a page? Here's a technique to try: Ask yourself two questions: (1) Why are we making users do these things? (2) Why are they all on the same screen? Answer the questions aloud. Talk to one of your colleagues about it. Ask them the same questions. Get conversational. Say a lot about it. Jot down the significant words you use in your answers. ...


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Maybe the name should describe what the task is about. Something like 'Tell us about you ...' or 'Before we start ...'.


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You're working on a usability script right? If you're looking for a term to use in conversation with a user, use terms they're familiar with. Apps to 'regular folk' means something you install on your phone. Websites are... well websites. I don't think web app is a known enough term to use in a test environment, so I'd avoid that. It's easiest to just use ...


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If your web site / application controls this system behavior, it is called personalization. If user controls it, it is called customization. More on this you can find for instance here: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/customization-personalization/ https://uxplanet.org/the-difference-between-customization-and-personalization-624ddd70b163


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DesignOps is a term that is getting quite a lot of attention in the UX design community, and is yet another trend that has emerged on the back of the DevOps function in organizations that have large development teams or complex development projects. Going back to the good old days where the UX designer was the judge, jury and executioner (sorry for the poor ...


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I would argue that in many cases this is exactly what a Design Systems or Design Platform team does—these people are responsible for the experience in the design org, especially relating to tooling and connecting the rift between design/product. I think calling it 'designops' is quite new, but many companies already have roles just like this. Essentially, ...


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