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The results in the study linked in the updates to that NNGroup article on URLs are limited to users viewing links on a web search results page with the intent to click one of the links to visit that webpage. Clearly, investigating suggested webpages could and does involve inspecting the URLs of said pages for many users. The study linked, however, provides ...


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Jabob Nielsen in his article URL as UI from 1999 highlights the importance of human-friendly and hackable URLs. Updates from 2005 and 2007 mentioning eye-tracking studies suggesting that people pay attention to URL. Another article by NNGroup, Navigation: You Are Here states that: Well-chosen, human-readable web addresses are important to sharing, ...


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What do breadcrumbs do? -Show how the user navigated to a particular page -Show the hierarchy of a page If a page has multiple different parents, identify a canonical path to it in the site hierarchy and show that path in the breadcrumb trail. Don’t attempt to personalize the breadcrumb trail so that it will reflect each user’s individual path within the ...


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We had a similar problem at the project I am currently working on. We decided that the breadcrumbs should represent the static hierarchy of pages - rather than the user's history. When representing the history of visited pages, the path would soon get confusingly complex, because search features, cross-links, etc. can generate a lot of redundancy. On the ...


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You could use a click test or chalk test if you want to test the visual layout and organization of the mega menu. You could measure the time taken to click, if you have all the options on the menu. If you just have the broad categories, you could ask testers where they would click to find x.


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Currently in the work I am in, we have designed several flows of 2 to 6 steps for the banking sector and we have used a progress tracking that has worked very well, our users (who are not customers) feel comfortable knowing in how many steps will complete the entire flow until the goal is completed, since they use these applications many times a day they ...


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I'm unable to share the research but in my testing the wizards I've created or had to support if the steps are less than 6, and the form complexity less than say 5 fields each generally the experience was helpful. Especially if the task is a communicative one where the user has to share where he's at with his co-workers/managers. There is a cliff you will ...


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Consider adding an "Optional secondary contact(s)" section at the bottom of the form. Here users can input as many contacts as they need. This example shows that the user has input one secondary contact, and may continue adding more as needed: If your system limits these to 2, then instead of using a table here, you can just have 2 optional sections (i.e. "...


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