110

We ran a quick user test and found that more people were signing up with their emails If you trust your test, then you should trust your users and design a solution that meets their desires. We are trying to encourage users to connect with their Facebook/Twitter accounts instead Why is that? Do you have sound reasoning behind this in that it will ...


64

Breadcrumbs rock! And I think you have a personal bias against them rather than making a clear observation about their use. I notice none of the big players (StackExchange, Facebook, Google, YouTube) use breadcrumbs. StackExchange uses tags. Those are like breadcrumbs, but it's an associated way rather than structural. Facebook uses AJAX inplace loading ...


32

Be transparent with your users. I would include a message that communicates two things: The application did its job successfully Facebook imposes this "inconvenient" requirement Perhaps something along the lines of: We successfully found 105 posts that match this criteria. In order to keep your account safe, Facebook doesn't allow 3rd-party ...


19

The only advantage that I see as a user (for sites that I don't actually want to use in combination with twitter/facebook) is that it is quicker to log in with an existing account. As such you may want to structure it like so: Log in with existing account (can be social media or email) vs Register new account


19

Provide a regular register method In a comment to your question I said that I wouldn't use your app if the only way to register is via social networks. The reasons vary from person to person and to not make this answer go off-topic too much I'll give you just a quick outline about some issues: Simple but relevant: I don't use the famous networks I don't ...


14

I recommend not restricting to jpeg only: Social media sites (usually) rely on people creating profiles and becoming active on the site. If at any point it becomes a pain to create a profile, users won't do it. If they have only a .png, they likely aren't going to go create a .jpeg to create a profile unless there is a huge incentive for them to continue. ...


12

As with any legal contract, both sides, including the user, must agree (“assent”) to the terms and conditions offered with the online service in order to create a legally enforceable “agreement.” In addition, a user can demonstrate agreement in a variety of ways, either by words or by deeds, depending on the circumstances. Online, however, the line between ...


12

Most users will recognize the logo mark for the social media platforms they use, so additional explanatory text for each icon would be overkill. If you do feel like users might need some additional context, you could use tooltips to display extra text on mouse hover. The current placement of your social icons seems random. It looks like you placed them in ...


12

I generally avoid signing up to random websites with Facebook, because I don't want those sites posting junk to my Facebook profile. One recent exception was Fallen London, which has a link saying "Read our civilised social media policy" right next to the "create a free account" -> "sign in with Facebook" link. The linked policy says things like "It's your ...


11

I do not think this is a secret design. Actually, this is a principle that may be inherited from newspapers or magazines: It would be impossible to read articles if they had not that three or four columns layout, just because your eyes would lose on which line you are reading and which is the next to read. This minimizes eyebal movements while reading. ...


11

It is perhaps not necessary to write out the label Facebook or Twitter next to the icon as Chris stated in his previous answer. But, please explain why I should follow you on Facebook. Is it for getting great discounts? Is it because you post new outfits that I can use for inspiration? Is it because I no longer need to go to your web site for updates? If ...


11

Facebook have follow feature if the user have set her account to allow followers. Followers only see posts that the followed user posts publicly. The main difference is that both parties have acknowledge that there is a friend relationship. One sends a friend request – the other accept (or decline) the request. But to follow someone – there is only one party ...


10

The best practice here is to display the social media icons in a neutral color, usually grey. This approach is both widely practiced and accepted. It's worth noting that most of the major social media brands have usage guidelines that explicitly prohibit the above. For example, Facebook's Brand permission center lists the specific brand assets that are ...


10

"companies put in fake links all the time, it makes it look like there's more there." That's about the dumbest thing I've heard, no offense. Visitors aren't dumb and shouldn't be treated as such. Only one thing will happen when a visitor finds out that you are lying to them: they will simply leave and never come back. I suggest you do 1 of 2 things: 1) ...


8

Stylize buttons Advantages: Buttons are more consistant with other parts of your design (provided your ui has style) The overall look and feel is improved (provided your buttons don't look stupid) Buttons can have more meaning (express different contexts) Users are very accustomed to styled buttons, as most of the major websites use them : google, facebook ...


8

I'm not sure about data on desktop design, but I can say that for mobile devices, people will often use the social media login option when it is presented. This article about mobile interaction and behavior tells us the following: SOCIAL LOGIN: While roughly half of the people who participate in our research say they don't like – or want – to make use of ...


7

Adding horizontal scrolling to FB is probably not the best idea. But, like most things design, it depends. In general, horizontal scrolling is: Bad for Mouse Users For mouse users, horizontal scrolling can be a jarring & frustrating UX. While nearly all mice have scroll wheels, many don't "lean" left/right, & for the ones that do, being precise ...


7

In my experience breadcrumbs are useful on sites that have some depth in the page hierarchy. The trail shows where the user is in the site hierarchy. Not only that, it also reveals nearby possibly-related content. Third, it's good for search engines so they understand where in the site they are, and can show context of search results. Use of a breadcrumb ...


7

This is entirely dependent on your target audience. For example: A career oriented website may only need linkedin or dribbble. Different social media platforms caters to different types of audiences. It's never a good idea to slap as many social media networks for the sake of it just being there. You should also keep in mind that in most cases less is ...


7

Tania Lang on her article Content Sharing and Social Networking Buttons, concluded the following based on scant research data : Ensure share buttons are subtle and contextual. Don’t include them below your H1 page heading. Give your poor users a chance to read something before they decide to share it. Shoving all the buttons in their faces is ...


7

I trust facebook.com (sort of), so I put information on there such as my likes. I don't trust just any old site I stumble across on the Internet. So there's no way that I'm going to register for your application with my Facebook account. However, after some use, I may find that I do trust your application. Then I might be ready to click "Connect with ...


7

For your specific question on which social logins to use, it depends on your users/market. However, Facebook is by far and away the most important one, followed by Google. Then a mix of Twitter, LinkedIn and Yahoo.


6

I think it depends on how you have organized your site's data structure. If your site presents information that is hierarchical in nature then breadcrumbs can help navigate 'up' a level to similar data from a leaf node. of course, it's possible to organize some data into a hierarchical manner even if it isn't necessary. Nowadays though, sites are trying ...


6

The problem with customized buttons is that they risk not being recognized if they break key styles and metaphors. In particular, buttons that are not rectangular and do not provide hover states could be perceived as non-interactive. Otherwise, custom buttons are a good way to give an interface strong branding and a sense of polish. Unstyled (or rather, OS-...


6

Yes, you should still provide social sharing options Here are some of the reason why: When using a share button on a site, you may not be sharing the same URL that the site appears to have. For example, if I select 'share' on this page, the URL that I get to share is: http://ux.stackexchange.com/q/38299/4595 (which includes my userID of 4595). But if I look ...


6

lot of the prominent social websites do have options to close or memoralize an account if a person dies. To quote this article Facebook: To report someone as deceased, Facebook requires documentation, such as a copy of the deceased's death certificate. Upon request, Facebook will "memorialise" the user's page, allowing friends and family to post ...


6

We used social plugin for couple of our products for login. To answer your first question, the simple advantage is that the user need not enter his credentials every time he/she signs in to your app. Most of the times the user is already logged into FB / google etc and can use the same to sign into your app too. A large percentage of users turn away when ...


5

A button should look like a button, but beyond that the important thing is that the style the buttons (and all the elements really) fit in with the style of the page/site as a whole. This is the area of visual design or graphic design and involves color theory, typography, principles of contrast, repetition, etc. Craigslist.org is very utilitarian and ...


5

When the user comes to the Home page, the user does not expect to see the form top left because it's not the most important thing on the website, from the users perspective. uxmovement has a good article about this.


5

The short answer is it depends. On a basic website with a handful of pages, breadcrumbs are certainly unnecessary. But on larger sites (especially reference and documentation sites), breadcrumbs are extremely useful for navigation and orientation—one might even say they're downright necessary. The hard part is determining whether your site is large enough to ...


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