44

My friend at Malmö University, André Mabande, wrote his Bachelor degree on the topic with the title Designing for Dialogue. He concludes that: The findings in this study seem to validate the hypothesis of the chronology as a major factor for generating a consistent discussion within a commenting field. When comments are shown in the order posted (i....


24

If you expect comments to be part of a conversation, then you should order them from oldest to newest (bottom posting). This follows reading direction, and is far easier to follow a series of related comments. Examples include this site's comments and Reddit. If you want to emphasise novelty over conversation, you should order comments from newest to ...


10

It is not bad UX, it is good UX exactly for the reasons you listed. The site has some business reason to not want to have long comments. It doesn't matter what their reason is. They don't want them, and they know that they can't make the system so watertight so the users won't ever do it. So what they do is a very good UX. They 1) make it clear to the ...


10

Commenting is all about context. A few examples of websites encouraging people to generate content On a social platform like Facebook, asking "What's on your mind?" in the new-status box is an interactive, clear and concise way to hint as to what is to be written. On a knowledge-sharing, social platform like Quora, indicating topics of interest to the users ...


9

Trying to find a more complicated solution that feels natural is a recipe for failure. Keep it simple. Even if it isn't 100% perfect for all cases, as long as it's clear, you get most of the benefit. News feeds should use a top posting as the newest feed is the most important. This can also apply to commenting if the newest comments are more important. ...


8

I've approached this problem, by not indenting, in some situations, and using arrows to indicate which comment replies to which comment. Here's an example, from an open source discussion system I'm developing: Here's a link to the above example, in real life: http://www.debiki.com/-71cs1#post-116979 (I also wrote a blog article about this: http://www....


7

UX never exists in a vaccuum This is a tough question. In a perfect UX world, you'd build a self-contained, hand-tailored, exquisitely smooth product that does everything your user needs. But then you also have to account for the whole business and profitability thing. Reality dictates that we can't build everything (even if it just means integrating ...


6

You can use background color to represent going deeper in the hierarchy and avoid using too much indentation. If you do not want to color the entire background of the post, you can do just highlighting the edge with a color. In any case, I would still have the tiniest amount of indenting because it is a much stronger visual cue. You can compensate the ...


6

One of the main goals of Soundcloud is to help artists get feedback for their creations. From an UX point of view it makes sense to link comments to the visual waveform of a track because the artist knows exactly what the comment is referring to. You have to listen to the track in order to understand the feedback. For example "The bass is a little to loud ...


6

If the internet has taught us one thing it's that everyone has an opinion. It has also taught us that attention spans online are short so unless I feel that sharing my opinion is worth the effort I'll pass. Here are a couple things you can do to remedy this situation and increase reader engagement... 1. Make sure users know why their opinion is important ...


5

I think it depends very much on what do you try to achieve. If your main focus is to make your readers consume a content you provide on a page I think you should not distract them with additional content which are comments shown aside. If your main task is to try engage users into conversations and socialize them with each other, then I think it's a great ...


5

Many, Many more people read a comment then write it. It costs more to read a comment if it is longer. It takes someone longer to condense their thoughts into a short space. So by having short comments we put the cost on the writer, rather than every reader.


5

The major issue here is I don't know how to answer the question about deletion. You've asked the question in plain English, but I assume you are expecting me to answer in symbolic form. Do I click the 'trash symbol' to delete the message? It would be much clearer if the symbol was appended with the words "Yes, delete this comment". How do I cancel? There's ...


5

I have found in all of my designs the limitation on how big a comment can be is based either by the business not wanting to read long comments, or by some Tech Arch / Data Arch claiming that it will take too long to fetch or will take up too much space in the data base. From an ideal perspective there is no reason to limit what is captured, just put in a ...


4

I think your idea is part of a well balanced, fortified solution. If you could do anything, consider adding an instructional popover message where the new comment entry point is. Something like: "We've made commenting even better...." Enter a new comment here, reply to comments there...." It would appear when the user scrolls/links or in any other way ...


4

What you did was a competitive analysis based on user reviews. You're asking if anyone has used a similar technique to validate ideas, and I have. Online reviews are fantastic sources of qualitative data, whether you are using Yelp reviews, Google+ endorsements, or product reviews on the app store. But they need to be taken with a grain of salt, as you ...


4

The single bad thing about Comments is Spam. Once your blog starts to get active users, many bots will try to spam the comment section with useless posts redirecting to malicious websites. This is a serious issue since it will also lead to deterioration of your personal brand with such comments and some might post negative comments which aren't ...


4

It probably means that they want to encourage novelty over discussion. See this other question for some more general discussion on comment-order Display comments order - best practice.


3

Another way is to implement a way to upvote/downvote the comments, like here, reddit, disqus, and display the highest ranked posts first. It gives insightful comments more visibility. Youtube also display the two most upvoted comments (also regarding the age of the comment).


3

Since you are designing something which falls in the behavior design domain, I would like you to point out the few key thing I learnt in that; Do not design for guilt. Your design should not be making the user feel guilty about their choices. Celebrate each and every tiny success. This helps in reinforcing the belief that you are doing good and helps you ...


3

The final word on confirmation dialogs is given in the article Never use a warning when you mean undo by Aza Raskin on A List Apart. Here's the key idea: People habituate: they press 'yes' without thinking, because 99% of the time that's what they want. The confirmation dialog isn't effective at asking for the required attention. People shouldn't have to ...


3

I think people are getting off topic here, essentially you've asked 'which of the options out of my choice of 4 is best'. In which case the current option you are using is best as it's the most common and clear. The ones with questions could help as they are leading people in, but frankly if 1/1000 visitors is commenting at present I'd said switching to one ...


3

There's a useful overview, including pros-and-cons, of various types of conversation threading here; http://www.elezea.com/2015/09/how-to-display-threaded-discussions-on-the-web/ which might be useful. Based on the research done, the decision was made to use the Teased, Capped, Threaded format; Hope this helps :)


3

You've designed it well. The comments should be beneath the list of books to support consistency with other websites. Comments should be always after the main content of the page. The only thing you can improve, in order to save valuable screen space above the fold of the page is to move the navigation up where the "Website title" area is. You don't want to ...


3

the solution submission button is featured prominently on the page Your users are pretty much telling you that it is not, and what's more, they also seem to be telling you which way they feel more natural interacting with your site. I think the reason is permanence and flow, a user might scan the page, notice or not the submit solution button, and then ...


3

There is no "ideal phrase" for "it". They are both different terms that mean different things. Comment a note explaining, illustrating, or criticizing the meaning of a writing Comments on the passage were printed in the margin. an observation or remark expressing an opinion or attitude critical comments constructive comments a judgment ...


2

I like your minimized design approach but one of the things you need to remember is that people are encouraged to interact when they are aware of the social aspect of what they are interacting with. Hence a small snippet of the available comments or a few comments which have set the ball rolling will be helpful in driving user interaction. Hence I would ...


2

A few things: The visibility (public/private) for the comment is presented very subtly and it would be really easy for a user to post as public when they intended the comment to be private. It's really not at all obvious that the little arrow in the corner would have anything to do with posting as public or private. It's particularly confusing for desktop ...


2

I cannot propose you the complete UI. But i can give you some brevity tips. At first, you have to check what will the contents of most stairs (aka user's responses) if it's mostly like tech-user-forums, each response will be -- mostly text (opinion and/or code snippet), -- occasionally image or snapshot. And, -- user's signature(...) You can easily strip ...


2

Good question. First each user have different perspectives. In most of the technical blogs comments are as equally important as the blog itself.It is not the same case that all the users dislike the long page functionality that has the entire comments. May be there are some just like you. If you just want to show the exact page length to the user and not ...


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