43

My friend at Malmö University, André Mabande, wrote his Bachelor degree on the topic with the title Designing for Dialogue. He concludes that: The findings in this study seem to validate the hypothesis of the chronology as a major factor for generating a consistent discussion within a commenting field. When comments are shown in the order posted (i....


23

If you expect comments to be part of a conversation, then you should order them from oldest to newest (bottom posting). This follows reading direction, and is far easier to follow a series of related comments. Examples include this site's comments and Reddit. If you want to emphasise novelty over conversation, you should order comments from newest to ...


19

From the standpoint of the person filling out the form, I too recommend not setting any limit on how much information the user is allowed to send. Unfortunately this isn't actually a realistic goal. What happens when a user submits the form with 100k lines of text? Simply put, you don't want users to abuse the feedback form, as it could be detrimental to ...


17

To me, this is all about alternatives, providing the "value menu" of things most people would want to say in a tiny comment, in one click. Provided you have made the alternatives, e.g. "click the +1/awesome/like button!" discoverable and easy, I favor a blocking message like: We prefer that comments be longer than 15 characters so they add substantively ...


17

I would recommend a No Limit for the text field upon composing but a suitable limit upon listing. What I mean is that if the user is limited to expressing their opinion in a regulated fashion the true nature of their opinion could be altered. They may need 752 characters to express their opinion but you've set the limit to 500 characters, what should they ...


11

While I agree with the other answers that you shouldn't impose an arbitrary small limit since you want to give users the freedom to fully express themselves. I will propose an alternate view related to security that there should be a hard upper limit to protect your systems. If you allow unlimited text to be entered it might be possible for a would be ...


10

It is not bad UX, it is good UX exactly for the reasons you listed. The site has some business reason to not want to have long comments. It doesn't matter what their reason is. They don't want them, and they know that they can't make the system so watertight so the users won't ever do it. So what they do is a very good UX. They 1) make it clear to the ...


10

Commenting is all about context. A few examples of websites encouraging people to generate content On a social platform like Facebook, asking "What's on your mind?" in the new-status box is an interactive, clear and concise way to hint as to what is to be written. On a knowledge-sharing, social platform like Quora, indicating topics of interest to the users ...


9

Have you considered offering a recommended limit? For instance, if a comment is less than say, 15 characters, upon submitting the comment the user is presented with an alert suggesting that they elaborate on their comment. This will make the user consider the value of their comment, and will hopefully trigger the action of adding more substance. Always give ...


9

Well...is it a problem? I forget where I heard this, but there's a story about how everyone assumes those "no dogs" signs are just put up in stores just because they've always been there, it's convention. But really, those signs get put up because someone brought a dog, and it caused problems. To avoid further problems, they banned dogs. Now, maybe they didn'...


9

Trying to find a more complicated solution that feels natural is a recipe for failure. Keep it simple. Even if it isn't 100% perfect for all cases, as long as it's clear, you get most of the benefit. News feeds should use a top posting as the newest feed is the most important. This can also apply to commenting if the newest comments are more important. ...


8

I've approached this problem, by not indenting, in some situations, and using arrows to indicate which comment replies to which comment. Here's an example, from an open source discussion system I'm developing: Here's a link to the above example, in real life: http://www.debiki.com/-71cs1#post-116979 (I also wrote a blog article about this: http://www....


7

One of the main advantages for requiring the user to enter in their email address when commenting is actually for the site administrator. There may be instances where your comment prompts a response not suited to, or too large for the comments section, and as such they will contact you directly. It also acts as an extra barrier (although not a very good one)...


7

UX never exists in a vaccuum This is a tough question. In a perfect UX world, you'd build a self-contained, hand-tailored, exquisitely smooth product that does everything your user needs. But then you also have to account for the whole business and profitability thing. Reality dictates that we can't build everything (even if it just means integrating ...


6

You can use background color to represent going deeper in the hierarchy and avoid using too much indentation. If you do not want to color the entire background of the post, you can do just highlighting the edge with a color. In any case, I would still have the tiniest amount of indenting because it is a much stronger visual cue. You can compensate the ...


6

One of the main goals of Soundcloud is to help artists get feedback for their creations. From an UX point of view it makes sense to link comments to the visual waveform of a track because the artist knows exactly what the comment is referring to. You have to listen to the track in order to understand the feedback. For example "The bass is a little to loud ...


6

If the internet has taught us one thing it's that everyone has an opinion. It has also taught us that attention spans online are short so unless I feel that sharing my opinion is worth the effort I'll pass. Here are a couple things you can do to remedy this situation and increase reader engagement... 1. Make sure users know why their opinion is important ...


5

I think it depends very much on what do you try to achieve. If your main focus is to make your readers consume a content you provide on a page I think you should not distract them with additional content which are comments shown aside. If your main task is to try engage users into conversations and socialize them with each other, then I think it's a great ...


5

Many, Many more people read a comment then write it. It costs more to read a comment if it is longer. It takes someone longer to condense their thoughts into a short space. So by having short comments we put the cost on the writer, rather than every reader.


5

I have found in all of my designs the limitation on how big a comment can be is based either by the business not wanting to read long comments, or by some Tech Arch / Data Arch claiming that it will take too long to fetch or will take up too much space in the data base. From an ideal perspective there is no reason to limit what is captured, just put in a ...


4

I think your idea is part of a well balanced, fortified solution. If you could do anything, consider adding an instructional popover message where the new comment entry point is. Something like: "We've made commenting even better...." Enter a new comment here, reply to comments there...." It would appear when the user scrolls/links or in any other way ...


4

What you did was a competitive analysis based on user reviews. You're asking if anyone has used a similar technique to validate ideas, and I have. Online reviews are fantastic sources of qualitative data, whether you are using Yelp reviews, Google+ endorsements, or product reviews on the app store. But they need to be taken with a grain of salt, as you ...


4

The major issue here is I don't know how to answer the question about deletion. You've asked the question in plain English, but I assume you are expecting me to answer in symbolic form. Do I click the 'trash symbol' to delete the message? It would be much clearer if the symbol was appended with the words "Yes, delete this comment". How do I cancel? There's ...


4

The single bad thing about Comments is Spam. Once your blog starts to get active users, many bots will try to spam the comment section with useless posts redirecting to malicious websites. This is a serious issue since it will also lead to deterioration of your personal brand with such comments and some might post negative comments which aren't ...


3

I think you should consider the ability to rate the individual comment again, in a similar style to the thumbs up/down buttons on YouTube. You could then have a top comments section which I'm sure would highlight comment that are limitlessly more thoughtful than simply "Nice one!!". Further to this I find minimum constraints quite annoying wherever they are ...


3

Toddy, there is another question labeled Hierarchical/flat comment system that might be related to your inquiry. It got several answers (including one by me). I realized that things happened, over time. One is that people are now used to address responses not to a previous post but to somebody, using the "@" tags so common in twitter. Other thing, that ...


3

I'll assume your talking about a situation where the number of comments is shown but the comments themselves are hidden (and clicking on the number of comments expands to view the entire thread) People like to join into an active conversation, if they see an item with 10+ comments (for example) then they are probably going to assume the original post (or ...


3

I think a hard character limit goes against asking for feedback. Imagine yourself being asked for feedback and halfway through your explanation the person cuts you off. Saying "thats enough!". If you have users who are opinionated and gives lengthy explanation of what they like or not. Do you really want to stop them? If I, as a user have gone out of my way ...


3

There are a number of factors, some of which are beyond the interface's control like the nature of the content, but one factor in your control is how to handle identity. Disqus published a blog post and infographic a few months ago looking at policies of real-names vs. pseudonyms vs. complete anonymity, and found that pseudonyms (stable but user-defined) ...


3

Since you are designing something which falls in the behavior design domain, I would like you to point out the few key thing I learnt in that; Do not design for guilt. Your design should not be making the user feel guilty about their choices. Celebrate each and every tiny success. This helps in reinforcing the belief that you are doing good and helps you ...


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