168

It's not necessarily about "good UI design", but much more about taking all measures to prevent accidental deletion and ensure that the user is fully aware of what they are deleting. This blog entry here captures it quite well: Instead of giving users a confirmation button that they could mistakenly press, give them a text field and ask them to type ...


51

Just to be clear "good" UI design doesn't mean giving the user what they want. It often means helping the user to be a better version of themselves. In addition to what's already been mentioned, this pattern (and several like it) allow the UI to reduce speed. In general muscle memory -> speed -> mistakes -> sad path. Imagine that you're doing work in ...


15

This is to ensure that: You understand the danger of what you're doing. Most importantly, that you're actually deleting the right repo. If a user has a lot of repos with long names, it can be easy to get them mixed up. Typing the name is a good way to make sure you don't nuke the wrong one, which would be really really bad.


9

In my opinion, an extra modal with a bright red button that does't respond to keyboard actions (like the Enter key) would suffice. One would have to move their mouse onto the bright red button to click it for an extra layer of caution. This is less cumbersome and the disability to simply hit the Enter key is both simple and effective. (emphasis added) Are ...


9

I remap an unused keyboard key (via AutoHotKey) for intermittent use as a left-mouse-click to decrease strain from overuse of my mousing wrist, and sometimes (rarely) hit that key in the wrong spot when multitasking. I've also occasionally bumped the mouse itself and unintentionally clicked a button on a dialog. While "don't make me think" is a very good ...


9

It's not easy to propose an answer without seeing all the visual page content. These are some general concepts. The design problem is not the text, in fact the statement of the question says that it already has a solution: a maximum of 50-80 characters per line. The problem is the container frame and the structural lines created by the images. There's a ...


5

I already made what I call accidental mistakes: my hand shifted the second I pressed the button (wanted "Cancel", got "OK"). Alternatively: an ad popped up and shifted the page. the instruction was so confusing that I pressed the wrong button (of course not the less destructive one) I was "oh no no no" and in panic pressed the wrong button I may or may not ...


3

This is a really great question. However, I think we need more information about the actual experience you're trying to build to give you an adequate answer. I'd start by thinking about your users' goals. Are your use cases dependent on precision? Are they trying to analyze a massive list of these tiny amounts of currency? In many foreign exchange ...


3

< $0.01 might be another option to consider. It uses the "less than" symbol, which is possibly more familiar to people than the "almost equal to" symbol. However, it may require a bit more processing to understand, as it's showing a value that is further from the actual value it represents (0.01 vs 0.00). So how can we decide between ≈$0.00, ∼$0.00, or &...


3

What Github are trying to do here is avoid user error, but specifically "slips" as Don Norman refers to them in The design of everyday things. Slips occur when users intend to perform one action, but end up doing another (often similar) action. For example, typing an “i” instead of an “o” counts as a slip; accidentally putting liquid hand soap on one’s ...


2

I also prefer the bottom one, with the lighter navbar. There's more contrast, both for the bar itself and for its shadow. As for consistency, you could think of the dark theme as generally inverting all the colors, which also flips the relationships, like what happened here.


1

The switch has the advantage of clarity and the emojis bring the twist so mix it up


1

From my point of view, changing switch button doesn't make it more understandable. If you are going to change it anyway other than a slider, I'd prefer something meant two-sided image/emoji (like gemini) to make it more understandable as it's a changeable item. And as you say so, putting your name next to this slider icon, does make this icon more like your ...


1

I resigned from Navy after I've worked 5 years on warships and then 1.5 year on one of the headquarter's office. I didn't have to use any tech-related skills till I start Computational Art & Design Master even I studied Computer Engineering in my license degree. After my resignment, I totally switched off to a different career and first started to learn ...


1

Don't see any reason to lose the opportunity to create a differentiated product. If you can make the modal not feel like a warning, let's say it occupies a decent portion of the screen, whereas warnings are typically smaller, you might have a nice time experimenting with a new style.... Provided the above of course, you can't click outside to close it. If ...


1

Modal is should be more of an user-interruption when your application needs more information first to complete a task, such as "Are your sure? [delete] [cancel]", "Create new account: email, password" or to showcase a single image. In a messaging system like email, you typically would have a at least 2 separate pages: message index (your inbox) -> message ...


1

Since he has just a phone number and an email, you can just put that information in the "Contact us" session. There might not be a need for a button. The contacts could just be displayed on the website.


1

Full Name > Email > Message. Don't forget to add mandatory stars to the input fields ;) It's almost world standard to ask first name/surname to the user on the contact forms or registration forms. I've attached just one example. If you will google 'contact form examples' You will see also all of them start with the name. This is not a written rule. But ...


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