3

Clearly communicate the current state of the app/service/website to the user Do not send the missed data to all users Add a button to retrieve the missed data This way users who need the data will get it and you will not put a load on your backend.


3

Answering your first question: When should a toast arise in web app? A toast should arise directly after: a user action has been completed the system is now under a new state (e.g. error, warning or success) The reason for a toast arising directly after actions or system changes is to provide immediate system feedback, which aims to reassure the user ...


2

There's a third option: a footnote popup. The physical location of a footnote is in relation to a printed page, in interactive texts, the footnote popup makes much more sense: The information is in the exact place where the footnote is You avoid having to look for a special place to put the information and help the reader not to browse looking for it ...


2

I have also been faced with this particular decision and I must admit it really is a tough one. Having a 'long-press history popup on the go-back button so the user can skip to exactly where they want' would not make your user experience bad as long as it is presented to the user in an easy and understandable form. The end goal is letting the user know ...


2

Very interesting problem. Combine accounts Combine the accounts but have multiple users within an account. Something like Netflix where you can choose your user after logging in. Force users to create a name for their user so they can distinguish themselves. Additionaly you could make an annoying banner that keeps popping up after they login that tells ...


2

Implement a general "browse" feature. One social media-style app that impressed me with its new user experience is an app called Yonder. It's a photo sharing platform focused on outdoor adventure. I, being a brand new user, obviously was not following anyone on this new platform, but instead of presenting me with an empty feed, it defaulted my experience ...


2

The questions your user has (who can view this, and what are my current roles) can be detailed near the item to which they lack access. I have no idea what your UI looks like, but perhaps something like the following might help get you started with some ideas. I tend to find it best to be as transparent as possible to the user regarding issues like this.


2

As you mention WCAG I will presume you mean websites. (you should actually look at ATAG as that is likely to be more applicable.) As long as you can reach every function by keyboard then your application / site is accessible by 'the rules'. Job done right? It may be enough to meet the legal requirements or minimums, but we should change our thinking to ...


1

You could make the user decide which authentication he would prefer. However, you could set a default authentication type that all users would follow. Probably email, then add a 'use numeric code instead' option on the authentication screen.


1

From my UX viewpoint, notifications as toasts are good once I'm as a end-user is informed with something that is not so important or I'm surely aware of it as I triggered it explicitly, AND there is no damage if the toast is missed by me at all (let say, I'm eventually turned to my coffee machine for the next drink, or massaging my closed eyes etc.) In ...


1

I would do it with this priority: Message > Full Name > Email. Look at it from the mental model of people have a message and they type it then they sign their name. I hope this helps.


1

There are different perspectives to answering this question, and they have been addressed in previous questions separately that you can consider: Internal Consistency vs. Consistency across the Industry, which is based on balancing what is considered best practice and consistency with your own product and users. If you have a new product and new users this ...


1

For non-tech savvy users, it's hard to use gestures to drag items. Random click on the item itself – and user gets to the item's content. Gestures are non-visible, too. Here is a good point to use modes. Just let a user enters into the safe Change order mode and use buttons for re-ordering. This: makes it obvious of how to move an item up/down, or make it ...


1

I do not see any benefits of showing a preview of the address to the user, especially if no feedback is provided on why the first address was wrong. Please consider instead developing on form address validation that aids the user. ( Is the format ok ? , zip code exists within the city and country ? , is overall street name length ok ? etc. ) There are ...


1

Neither of both, as they are controversial with "start from the first click" interaction. Users are afraid of missing the first click if they would think that the timer starts right after the countdown or after the button press. And countdown stresses users even more instead of calming down, as it is an anticipation of the test. The existence of either ...


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