26

Microsoft chose to skip the characters A, E, I, L, N, O, S, U, 0, 1, & 5 for their Xbox Live codes. Based on this question and answer it appears that they chose to reduce the possible characters to reduce confusion. Some like O & 0, S & 5 were probably dropped for visual similarity, while others like E & N may have been dropped for audial ...


21

There is no UX guideline specific to passwords, but several usability heuristics can be applied to this use case: Error Prevention: eliminate error prone conditions (NNGroup Usability Heuristic #5) Keep it Simple (Lund's Usability Maxims #10) Reduce Short-term memory load (Shneiderman's Golden Rule of Interface Desgin #8) Mono-spaced Fonts Reduce Ambiguity ...


8

There are no standard guidelines of which I am aware; what I've observed most often is that, when dealing with issues of security like this one, companies prefer to evaluate their own security model and implement what they feel is best for their interests, rather than adopt a one-size-fits-all standard model. Option: Eliminating ambiguity Conveniently, this ...


7

LastPass's password generator has three options: easy to say (avoid numbers and special characters) easy to read (avoid ambiguous characters like l, 1, O and 0) all characters Unfortunately, I could not find anything more specific about the implementation. 1Password has a 'memorable password option' which concatenates 4 random English words together ...


5

There are 2 solutions here: You can use a monospaced font that is solving this problem. One example is IBM Plex font. You can check it here: https://www.ibm.com/plex/specs/ To consider: You need to put in balance where you will display this code too. For smaller sizes screens you might still have a problem with any font you choose. Also, this is not great ...


3

Short Answer Why not use all three? Colour, icon and text in brackets would be the best solution overall. Long Answer Don't use colour alone, if someone is colour blind colour alone is not useful in the slightest to them. What you suggest is indeed one of the best options. Use an icon AND some text to describe what the icon means. This makes your solution ...


3

Maybe it would be useful if you take a look at how Google Analytics solved this kind of problem: the individual days only show up if you hover your mouse directly over the data points. Meanwhile, your x-axis will now only show the name of the months.


3

You could use check mark ✔️ and a cross sign ❌ to convey success and failure. If you want to go for color, you could go for a monochromatic palette to indicate progress or some other form of progress indicator. Also you should never rely solely on color to communicate something to a user because of a potential color blindness.


3

I can think of some things to make it more obvious that the search has been triggered: Flash the search results Flash a light yellow background behind the search Add a label on top of the results "Search results for 'ux stackexchange'" Add a timestamp label "Last search: 2 seconds ago" I don't think it is interesting for the user to ...


1

I agree, "set the default based on their country, but still give them the option" would be also my preferred solution. Consider this, users might travel in a different country or use a os with a different language setting (if you plan on using that) or use a vpn to browse the web securely appearing to come from a different location Also, the IP ...


1

The only published guidelines I know of are about making sure that any text displayed is legible by appropriate choice and usage of fonts, contract, size, etc. The guidelines are intended to make sure all text is legible and require you to have a fairly high degree of control over the final display. If you are printing 5x7 dot matrix characters in red on a ...


1

In reality, a user should not be creating duplicate questions. What is the point in asking somebody the same question multiple times? Also, what is the point in asking somebody the same question multiple times? If the user wants to copy the description as a template because most of it will be reused each time, then I would recommend good old "copy 'n' ...


1

A common pattern for this sort of thing is "bulk edit"; essentially the ability to multi-select items (usually with a checkbox) and then having an Edit button that allows changing them all at once. So maybe you could do something similar by letting users check each question they want to change and making the edits in a single screen. Not a form ...


1

I'm a big fan of https://www.gov.uk/ And the Swedish government website https://www.government.se/ They are doing a great job and they invest a lot in user research before launching anything. I don't think I can share any screenshots but you can get a feeling of how well that website is organised.


1

A few years ago the company I worked at did a usability study of an app to test this exact question. In one test it was required that users provide their name, email address, and a few other metrics before they could gain access to the app. In the second test, we gave the user a try-before-you-buy experience first, exposing them to a very small sample of the ...


1

Storing personal data would touch many aspects. I think you need to consider the following in order to answer this. Whats the value addition of your decision? E.g.Would it be substantial performance improvement by storing locally? Would your app later plan to become cross channel. e.g. would it be accessible from smart watch or web. Privacy concerns- If it ...


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