77

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


41

Some research into Carousels usage on University of Notre Dame website has some interesting findings: Approximately 1% of visitors click on a feature. There was a total of 28,928 clicks on features for this time period. The feature was manually "switched/rotated" a total of 315,665 times. Of these clicks, 84% were on stories in position 1 with the rest ...


21

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


18

I'd say this isn't a dark pattern at all. The simplest definition of a Dark Pattern is design meant to trick people. Now, there can be good tricks too, so Dark Patterns are really about deceiving users into doing something that benefits your business goals but not them. There's no trickery here. They clearly present what they want you to do (Tweet), how to ...


18

I have read up on this a bit, and it seems that my answer will contradict some of the things that have already been mentioned. My sources are all academic, and as such reflect the use of on-line surveys for conducting experiments. Feel free to read the sources that I link to, and draw your own conclusions. I mention some peripheral work as it relates to on-...


15

few thoughts general idea is: users go for things that they see they will benefit from contrary, users don't go for something that isn't clear (why would I do that?) by putting screenshots on the main you are uncovering very essence of what's inside, and here is when you have to be 100% sure it doesn't suck, if a user sees it's cool, they will go further, ...


13

Yes, it's a dark pattern, because the website advertises it as free: But when you follow the link, then you find out it's not quite free - they want you to advertise their product. So it's a bait-and-switch. It advertises as if it is freeware, makes you psychologically commit by clicking onto "The Bricks" for more info. And then you find out that it's not ...


13

Standard Progressive Disclosure should start at the simplest, least intrusive information first. Maybe even consider allowing users to put off answering some parts of the form (this will probably reduce completion rate of the "extra" fields but increase the completion rate of the start of the survey). But if you must do it all in one go, I'd generally ...


13

I would do it like this. First, divide the process into two phases: First step, in which you require relatively low engagement from the user with relatively high profit for him. Second step, in which the user is already anchored on the promise of profit you have given him in the first step, so he will be more interested in a putting little bit more effort ...


13

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


10

We are naturally drawn to movement, so shaking any button will cause people to notice it more. That however is not necessarily a good thing. It isn't someone noticing it in a good way. You are very likely to annoy or people who are getting their attention drawn to something that they may not want to be looking at. Think of those annoying banner adds that ...


10

Wow, nice and interesting question! Personally I would consider that this rather depends on a person's philosophy and is more or less a morality issue. If dark patterns could do harm (financially, whatever), I am not sure this could be measured in an explicit way. The examples you gave, e.g. misleading ads, could IMO be very different from emails that ...


10

In psychology there is a lot of research into whether primacy (first presented) or recency (most recently presented) most affects the choices that people will make. To cut through a lot of theory, in most cases primacy dominates - especially when the choices are presented very close to each other in time. So if you want someone to go for a particular ...


10

Effect Size In A/B testing, effect size is the observed difference in performance between A and B. Take, for example, the following A/B results: A: 10 conversions out of 103 visits B: 6 conversions out of 97 visits. So A has a conversion rate of 10/103 = 9.71% while B has a conversion rate of 6/97 = 6.19%. The data suggest that over many visits, A will ...


9

This is a strategy usually followed by companies that follow price discrimination as a strategy. This could be because: The cost of providing that product actually depends (usually statistically) on who is asking for it. Think of insurance companies here, where a healthy 18 year old with no history of medical problems is likely to cost a lot less to ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


8

This sounds like a good opportunity for A/B testing - try all these variations and see which one gets the best results for the site's particular products and customers.


8

I know you said in your question that removing fields isn't an option, but that's the way to increase conversion, Luke W even says so. There are some fields that seem ripe for it - Salutation Do you need both job title and job role? You're collecting zip, city, state, and country, but not street address? If you're not sending them mail, then Country and Zip/...


8

The session is stored on the server whereas the cookies is stored on the user desktop. In the session, you have no way to retrieve the cart's information after the session is expired (generally 30 minutes at most). You will throw away 2 hours of Paula's time, who has struggled to choose that red shirt over the green one. Cookies's size and number are ...


8

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups :)


6

I would not say it's a dark pattern. Isn't it their's to decide what they would like in return for their offering? If you think it's bad, why don't you tweet your anger and give them the bad publicity they 'ask' for? Or, if you really rather not have anyone read about your interest in the resource (which this entry here seems to contradict), you can still ...


6

Here's an article that cites a couple semi-recent studies at Notre Dame and Nielsen/Norman. It might be relevant to the discussion. To summarize: Arrows are distracting! Don’t use web carousels for showcasing products Do use web carousels to brand your site or offering Web carousels are not ideal for desktop websites Web carousels get very significant taps ...


6

Guess a lot I know that sounds kind of silly, but that's what it comes down to. You can analyze Sales figures Seasonal volume spikes Site analytics Customer service feedback Related case studies and so on But none of that will tell you the why behind the behavior you're seeing. So you're left with one option: make smart, experience-informed guesses. ...


5

Don't make people think before they have made a commitment to sign up (by selecting a sign up button). Every time you make a potential customer think you create an opportunity for then to choose not to and leave your site. It's also much harder to later optimise your page when you have two sign up buttons, as suddenly there are more variables to consider. ...


5

From my own experience in looking at the analytics data of sites I've created, I can say that most users don't interact with a carousel, much less convert from one. I have noticed recently that a number of sites that used to have carousels no longer have them and are instead showing just one "panel" (if you look at the HTML, there's still remnants of a ...


5

I think "Free" could improve conversion in some cases but there might be some cultural issues you should take into account. In a project I was involved we added the word Free to our signup button, that was the only change we did. After analyzing the impact we discovered quite positive results in our American and British sites but negative consequences in ...


5

The answer to this can be a little complicated and i know lot of layout designers and grid specialists have spent a lifetime contemplating on this. Before entering into the discussion we need to ask whether you want to be open about the profits to your advertisers or whether its going to be an under the covers thing. If you are not going to be telling this ...


5

With all my projects the main reason is laws. In EU, you're required by law to get the users' informed and active consent before storing or accessing any kind of personal data. The ePrivacy directive – more specifically Article 5(3) – requires prior informed consent for storage ofor access to information stored on a user's terminal equipment. http://ec....


4

Well, it's the context that made you feel it's a dark pattern, what i would do, allow everyone to download everything, and ask nicely, "Would you please donate a tweet so more and more people could benefit"? Now if you allow me to download freely and show me this message afterwords, chances are 70-80% higher that i would tweet and still be happy, it makes ...


4

With subjects like this it's almost impossible to give a boolean answer. Let's take, for example, those ads you get on software sites that have 'Download' buttons in their design. Even to the trained eye they're hard to tell apart - dirty tactics well executed! Now if those ads take you to related software at a cost, and N user's purchase, the bad practice ...


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