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AND. As a user, the more I type in, the more specific I'm expecting the results to get, and this is what happens with AND. With OR, your results would explode! If my search for popular Google Doodle games gave me everything that was popular, everything Google, everything Doodle and every game out there, I'd be lost! If you're expecting your user to ...


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User interviews are a great way of research, you can use them on multiple occasions in a design process. When can you use them Gather information before you have a design / use them to make artifacts. Use them to fill gaps in other artifacts like persona's. At the end of a user test to have a verbal response related to observations. In your case, I would ...


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Take a look at Turbotax. They simplified the tax filing process into a series of steps that focuses the user in the task at hand. They have complex interdependencies and rules working in the background, but on its simplest form, it’s a multi-step form. Different from other multi-step forms, where the steps are laid out on the top, Turbotax relies in a side-...


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Ask how long they have been using the product and how often they use it. Asking users to estimate their experience level is likely to produce inflated values as everyone likes being seen as an expert and few will voluntarily rate themselves as novice. Frequency of use should correlate well to experience level if it's a product that is used regularly. ...


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This is a redesign job (a customer portal) for a big Australian company which I recently worked on. My initial interviews were focused on below three things What the portal does. How it does it. What are necessary and redundant things needed to be redesigned. This will help you get started with overview of the problem/approach the client has on why it ...


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This largely depends on the aims of your user interview. Also what are the aims or scope of your website redesign. is it an aesthetic facelift or you aim to fix UX issues too? If you want to find and fix UX issues you could gear towards user testing. and give them a task to complete on your major flows and observe how they complete it or struggle. You ...


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First, I think it is my due diligence to mention that without asking users in one way or another all you can rely on is speculation and generic user behavior patterns. Qualitative research is needed to answer this question better. To answer better would require more info, such as images of the 2 navigation options, but I will offer a few possibilities here: ...


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As far as I know you won't find a generic set of questions that work for you here. At least I don't know of anything that exists. For the large User Events I facilitate the day usually goes like this. Welcome/hand out surveys while people arrive Introduction Focus Group Questions Exercises/Testing The surveys have questions about experience with the tools/...


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This sound like the perfect opportunity for System Usability Scoring (also known as SUS). It allows you to ask your users a set of 10 questions about the usability of your application. The responses use Likert scale which you use to score your application. The scoring output is a grade like C+ or B- . This is great to see how your application has improved ...


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The different terms you mentioned as examples mean different things and serve different purposes. Depending on what the content is and what message you are trying to relay to users will answer whether or not such fields serve a purpose. Last Updated or Last Modified These terms mean the same thing and let users know if something changed since the content ...


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At a high level I would consider the main difference to be the maturity of the solution. In one case you have presumably a relatively mature existing solution. Work has been done, decisions made and possibly expectations set about the understanding of the problem, including users, technical aspects, content, organisational aspects, information architecture ...


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