Hot answers tagged

94

If your mapping framework provides the feature, highlighting a "suburb" might be appropriate for your use case. Of course the actual size of what is considered a suburb varies widely from region to region. This screenshot shows google maps highlighting the suburb of Tanunda, South Australia.


51

I would not use the map as a user interface when the address is still private information. Because, the map is used to represent precise locations at some level you will always run into the issue of privacy. The map is useful if the user gets to choose events they would like to attend based on location. So I question the usefulness of a map of events if ...


39

If you are providing a valuable service/product there will always be people trying to "cheat" the system and get in. Providing a free trial period is an industry norm and over time users may sign up for more than one trial but that will get old fast. I would worry less about ensuring authentic users and focus more on providing that great content. If you're ...


17

Have a default face to put instead of the 'blurred' person. That way you could have actual faces, thus leaving the overall visual of the image, whereas a blur or pixelation would make it more obviously edited. (source: kym-cdn.com) Note: I'm only half-serious about the solution, but if you do this you should obviously use a more neutral face like these. ...


15

This is a tough issue that I'm not sure anyone has really solved yet, but here are my thoughts for your 3 solutions. Phone number Yes this might be a bit personal or creepy but I feel like it's becoming less so since people are actually using their phones less and less. You'll want to be clear that you're not selling their phone number to a marketing agency ...


15

Whenever your TOS change, you should show them whenever the app starts. Here's a simple mockup: The user must click on the "Proceed" button to continue using the app. This button is enabled only if the checkbox "Accept the TOS" is ticked. You might want to add another button "Exit" to allow the user to go back easily to the device's home screen.


15

Another option, not sure if you've considered this: Ask the person setting up the event for a nearby public landmark (library, shopping center, etc.). Then use that location. That saves you from needing a lot of local knowledge and should handle a pretty wide variety of population densities. It also nicely handles things like rivers. Around here, for ...


14

Your idea sounds like a reasonable solution. I would, however, ensure that this offset is not just randomly generated every time the map loads... With enough randomly-generated offsets, it would be possible to derive the actual center of this distribution. Additionally, if you'd like to really emphasize that it's a general area, don't display a defined ...


13

Consider using federated user authentication from some social network like Facebook or Twitter. You can suggest to your user that your use of social credentials is a service to them, saving them the hassle of remembering and maintaining a different username/password set for your site. Should they change their password on the social network, your site would ...


12

As with any legal contract, both sides, including the user, must agree (“assent”) to the terms and conditions offered with the online service in order to create a legally enforceable “agreement.” In addition, a user can demonstrate agreement in a variety of ways, either by words or by deeds, depending on the circumstances. Online, however, the line between ...


9

Honestly, a valuable product. You are not the first one to offer trials. You would scare more potential customers off than you would save through fraud-detection processes. If your customers like what you do, they will pay for it. If they use your software on a regular basis and still create a new account each time, they can't or don't want to afford it. ...


9

Right now, you should not be solving this problem. Not only is it a problem you do not have, but solving it too early may mean you will never have the problem. Lemme splain. Lemme sum up. The more you try to reduce the % of fraud, the more it costs to prevent each instance of fraud. This cost is in the time you spend directly preventing fraud, the ...


9

First, I thought they try to prevent attackers from randomly guessing email addresses and checking whether they are registered or not. Imagine you know that Donald.Trump@yahoo.com is registered to, e.g., craigslist. This might be a great privacy issue in some cases. This is precisely the reason why so many websites have implemented it that way and that's ...


8

Well, here are some of the common methods: Are any of those aesthetic? Well, we are dealing with Trump. So we could argue they are all improvements. But, ultimately, no. None of these types of methods are aesthetic because they are all unnatural. Humans even at a few days old have an ability to 'see' faces quite well. Any editing that would seem the least ...


8

Use the postal codes and corresponding area locations. It's an already implemented obfuscation/aggregation system adjusted for population density.


8

You don't want anyone knowing even that someone has an account. If a malicious actor is searching for info on someone, it could be potentially damaging just knowing that someone even has an account / is a member of an organization. Each piece of info is a betrayal of a users right to privacy. To go further, let's say you have an organization or app that a ...


7

I think that there's no real solution to your problem. That might be hard to hear, but there's no way to gain any security without sacrificing your user experience. Instead, we just need to pick the "least-worst" choice. Using a phone number or credit card number for anything is grounds for an immediate bounce from most users. If you looked at a study, you ...


6

No. Always allow the user to opt-in. You could prompt the user the first time the app is ran, with a message explaining why it would be a great idea for them to join, but I would default off. Automatic opt in causes the PERCEPTION of your app to be "shady" for some people. This perception has a big influence on the total UX. And what's more - this can, ...


6

lot of the prominent social websites do have options to close or memoralize an account if a person dies. To quote this article Facebook: To report someone as deceased, Facebook requires documentation, such as a copy of the deceased's death certificate. Upon request, Facebook will "memorialise" the user's page, allowing friends and family to post ...


5

There are two general types of agreements with online terms and conditions. Explicit agreements are generally enforceable. These are usually in the form of checking a box that says you agree, or by clicking a button that says you agree. Implicit agreements are unenforceable and have no legal weight. These are when you have something that says "by ...


5

A Gaussian blur is definitely soft and appealing as a form of censorship. As far as straight up censorship goes, it's the least invasive and least harmful. For better alternatives to blatant censorship, take a look at some advertising banners. You can often censor people's features by providing an overlapping object/banner. An easy way to do this is stitch ...


4

UX studies are almost always about testing things that we either want people to do, or things that we don't want them to do. It is rarely about testing whether they do something that we don't care about from a UX perspective. So it is highly unlikely that you will find a UX study on this. You need to remember that besides just treating your customers well,...


4

We use phone verification that limits duplicate accounts. We ask them to text the number they see on the screen. Note, we don't ask them right away but we do limit pro features that require verification. We noticed good conversion rate of users and also less duplicate accounts (since most users have one cell number :) One funny thing we noticed is that ...


4

You're coming up against the difference between account and data retention. While in an ideal world, we would like the two to be the same thing, when it comes to certain legal issues, they are not. You should definitely cover this in your privacy policy, and make sure that it's readable and not impenetrable legalese. However, deleting an account is not ...


4

We work in mobile and have developed apps for the NHS and other healthcare clients. Clearly the patient's details and medical information is of a private and sensitive nature. The way we have tackled this in the past is that our developers have wrote routines to anonymize the data. For some clients it is simply enough to replace names, addresses and dates ...


4

You obviously cannot just take your precise loction and cover it with a blurb of grey; it still pinpoints right to the destination. What you can (easily) do, though, is pick the next city, point out that city, and then make it very clear from the UI that the location is not by chance the center of that city. Make your location maker so obviously in the ...


4

If you limit the zoom and use a fairly large blob rather than a pin marker, this has a natural feel of low precision. Here's a mockup: Only major roads are shown but you can still see which side of the city the event is; you can't navigate. I know some mapping APIs allow custom markers; I believe some allow limited zoom, at least when used embedded. The ...


4

2) Can this be termed as dark UX? Short Answer: No. Why? Because Dark Pattern is a user interface that has been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_pattern https://www.darkpatterns.org/ What you are referring to here has ...


3

The minimal information might be called mandatory information in the context of government organizations because they have to comply with personal and privacy information that mandates only the minimal information is required to complete tasks/transactions. However, I think the lines are rather blurred as you say, when there are no clear guidelines and it is ...


3

If you display the actual encrypted username then someone may eventually crack it - quite by coincidence, I have just spent the afternoon reading a downloaded PDF on how to do it, hence why I am answering your question. As you state that you have privacy concerns, then you DO NOT want that to happen, however remote the possibility or long it takes. If you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible