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16

It sounds as if you are seeking a formulaic answer about a specific button pattern fit for an exclusive purpose and feel that this goal is not being met. Straight off the bat, there is no such formula. But here are a few things to consider. Link Buttons Are a Thing Text-only, rimless buttons have become a fairly common interface element without being ...


10

I suggest you to do like the most websites. Same shape, side by side, different colours. Highlight and put first the main used button. See good examples below. I know that you ask just about the format and my answer is a bit more complex but this definitely could help you. Make buttons intuitive changing their positions More buttons, more option, more ...


7

Clarity can trump consistency in certain situations. For applications with changing contexts, there's lots of purposeful instances of design system inconsistencies. I've seen examples of wizards where the < Back Next > buttons are positioned next to each other, as well as the approach you have below, and both seemed to work. Test with your users, and ...


6

The reason a textual link is used instead of a button is to make it somewhat difficult for the user to delete or cancel unintentionally. The primary button in any form would be the Submit button. To draw more attention to the primary action which is to let the user save their data, Cancel and Delete buttons may be put as text links, displaying lower visual ...


3

The four options that i found and most of the time use are; Cancel button Close button Escape key Click outside the window You can read more about modals here: https://uxplanet.org/best-practices-for-modals-overlays-dialog-windows-c00c66cddd8c


3

If this is a web page you're talking about, there is nothing wrong with a hyperlink. As long as it has a clear label. Maybe "close" is not enough and is "close form" or something better understood by your users. With this I come to the core problem of the question: It shouldn't be asked to us but to real users, test it and you'll know. But to give a more ...


2

If buttons are semantically/functional related, then they should be in close proximity regardless of their appearance. An example would be a window/screen that has a 'cancel' button and a 'submit' button. A common practice is place them at opposite sides of the window/screen, but that's not ideal because people have very limited central vision. Even though ...


2

Consider the metaphor you're using and its roots. Buttons. What are buttons? They're an element you can "press" or "click" to take some action. Where does this metaphor come from? From physical machines. Do physical machines have buttons of different size or shape near one another? Yes! Look down at the keyboard in front of you. Assuming you aren't using a ...


2

There are limited shapes we can use for buttons - rectangle, rounded rectangle, circle. If we use too many shapes for buttons, it wouldn look more like icons rather than buttons. It is necessary to keep consistent shape for action buttons as people generally scan interface and consistency helps to fix user attention towards action. Again, if some buttons ...


1

It seems you may have two issues: which segment is selected, and what can the user search on, especially if the user comes with an immediate intention to search. In your mock, you have two different data sets, but you're using a control placement way to the right of the data, so to see at a glance which is selected, my eyes have to look right. The search ...


1

It's definitely a challenge with toggle buttons. We had to use them in one of our projects and we assumed that indicating the active state by changing the background to the primary colour would be enough. However, user interviews showed us that we were wrong. Whenever we had a collection of three toggle buttons, the user did not seem to be confused. When it ...


1

You can try removing the background color of the button to indicate inactive state. Having color on both the states is confusing because they both stand out equally. To further improve, use bold typeface for the active state.


1

I think the factor at play here has less to do with “Consistency” and more with the principal of “Proximity”. That being, items similar to one another should be placed near each other. From a logical perspective, it’s easy to assume the user would associate “back” and “forward” with left and right corners. But users don’t typically take a logical approach ...


1

I have an alternate suggestion, which may or may not make sense based on how you're adding new items (and how you're displaying them in the Content Menu). If those Content Menu navigation items are showing those types of content when clicked, you may want to put the "Add New" button alongside each menu item in the content menu. This is a common pattern and ...


1

TL;DR: Grouping related items is usually a good thing. If we look at Whatsapp (a popular chat app currently owned by Facebook) as an example and examine how it handles 'action' placement, you'll notice that it's all on the right. This definitely has to do with the fact that it's a mostly mobile app (though the web variant does the same). But this is also ...


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