179

Pop-up windows are a pestilence on the web. Users are fed up with them. People visited your web site because they wanted to view information about some product. But as soon as they started scrolling down, an annoying pop-up window appeared in the middle of the screen, blocking what they were trying to read. Their response was simple - get rid of that ...


100

I would say that "New" is best in most situations, as it is short and distinct. A good rule of thumb is to look at the other options you will have in your menu. You want to make scanning fast, so you want to make each option as distinct as possible. Here is a crude example of what I mean: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


94

No. Trying to give applications personality is one of those things that's just not well thought out. It definitely seems like it's one of those solutions that developers came up with and never user tested. In a classic UI UX failure, developers came up with the talking paper clip solution in response to this same issue: https://archive.org/details/g4tv.com-...


88

"Like" is Facebook's creation and is strongly associated with Facebook. +1 is Google+'s creation and is totally associated with its brand. Thinking out of the box... It seems your functionality is not exactly the same as "liking". It's more "like & follow". There is no single word for that, so alternatively you could invent your own vocabulary. ...


78

Ok I might be on to something: "New" is good for buttons that take the user to a clean "canvas", where the user can add his content. "Create" is good for buttons that "submit" the user's content or input (either into a database or to some public platform). In other words, "New" doesn't suggest that you're actually creating anything. It just sets the stage ...


55

We are not talking about Facebook visitors, but professional users in the business environment. Simply hire people who understand what they are doing. No UX improvement can be a replacement for that.


53

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


52

The idea of 'click here' being a bad idea originated from data about how people visually scan web pages which show that people don't read online: they skim the page to get the key information. If someone is scanning, 'click here' (particularly if there are lots of them!) links are totally meaningless in isolation: the user has to spend time reading around ...


50

AP style says "spell out whole numbers below 10, and use figures for 10 and above". Chicago Manual style says spells out numbers below 100, or as an alternative rule to use AP style instead. Nielsen Norman Group says, basically, to heck with the old rules; everybody just skims online anyway so use figures for all specific numbers, because people notice ...


47

Personally I like love which is often represented by an icon of a heart and popular in social media. Then you dont have to write the word love but simply use the heart. But if you don't like the heart icon, you can always find a synonym from Thesaurus.com:


46

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


39

As other have said, most visitors have developed a banner blindness and will either ignore or close your pop-up without reading its content. Improving the content of the banner will have minimal effect on this behavior. A better alternative would be to advertise your feature inside the page content and not as a generic overlay. Depending on what value your ...


38

Designers' over-sensitivity It is easy for designers to overthink things (and equally under-think things). I highly recommend reading this research paper: Petrie, H. & Power, C. (2012). What Do Users Really Care About? A Comparison of Usability Problems Found by Users and Experts on Highly Interactive Websites. Proceedings of Human Factors in Computing ...


37

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


30

As a non-native english speaker, I always have found sign in & sign up, VERY confusing, I always click the wrong button. You should avoid Sign up. Login and Logout are not so much confusing


30

I think that this article about the “Sign Up” button is interesting, the author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212%. His thesis is that the standard “Sign Up” buttons don’t work because “they ask for blind commitment” and “do not offer any value”. Visitors also “see common elements repeated on many sites” and “they ...


29

What about Star? Google Reader did this and it was pretty clear it went into the Starred Items folder and your friends would also see you starred an item; it also served to bookmark. The other thing I was just thinking is that unless you told people, no matter what term you used it would still be unclear you "liked" that user. That seems totally different ...


25

Not according to Microsoft. Use title-style capitalization, without ending punctuation. Source: Microsoft Guidelines for Windows, section about error messages.


25

Don’t make them read it I'm guessing your call center staff is like everybody else's: Unmotivated and paid as little as possible. How do you make them do anything? You do it for them. Record it 🤖 💬 Record the critical messages and embed them in the application. Make the employee click a button to play a recording of the message as part of their ...


25

There are a few issues that spring to mind here. For example: The title of your Popup is 'New Feature!', but you don't explain clearly what that feature is OR why it's of value to the user. If the current 'deal' the user is viewing isn't interesting, why would they want updates of a similar type? The button text says 'Activate Now'. Again, the user may not ...


20

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online University of Oxford Style Guide states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The Oxford Guide to Style states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


20

I think "Favourite" is the nicest commonly used internet term that encompasses the ideas of "like" and "bookmark".


19

Use Log in to avoid capture slips I would be very careful with the "common usage" argument. For example: the use of sign up and sign in has a very pleasant symmetry which doubtless appeals to many people. Unfortunately, this symmetry reduces the difference by which the user recognizes the button she needs to just two letters. It's very easy to click sign up ...


18

TL;DR You don't, and can't, get high response rates because nobody wants the notifications. Nobody, and I mean NOBODY, actually wants to "opt in for web push notifications". That is the core problem. One of the absolute top things I do on a customer's computer the first time I work on it is to remove existing browser push notifications and turn off ...


17

EDIT: AFTER QUESTION TITLE CHANGE Now that the question has completely changed, I want to edit my answer to fit the question. This question, now, is definitely slightly beyond just user experience. Ensuring the staff's activity is like setting up regulations for their behaviors which cannot be achieved by UX changes. However, If the sound controls are out of ...


16

My answer would be to synopsis the question of the modal form, so with the question being: You are leaving the question with unsaved changes The title would be: "Unsaved Changes" It's a pattern I've seen and used regularly, it's brief and informative.


15

You should use simple and direct language to communicate with the users. When writing error messages be polite and provide meaningful actionable messages. Keep the apologies for cases when the mistake is on your part for which you want to apologise. Use a consistent first person language, it is okey to use 'we' when addressing the system. I assume when you ...


14

Most of the answers here are applicable to a typical self-service application, but you've specifically asked about a call centre situation. This means the UX should be optimised for users who are familiar with the screens, and you have more control over your users' behaviour (because they are working for you). Typically in call centres staff have a strong ...


14

I think you're on a bad footing if there's any confusion over the role the user is in when viewing a page. It's generally a good idea to use a non-overlapping language appropriate to the role, and set the tone and context so that the user simply cannot be confused. As a host, you might see phrases like your property/properties your home your listings ...


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