374

My suggestion: never use the word "Cancel" in the default action. To cancel a subscription, you can, for example, say "Remove Subscription" or "Unsubscribe." To cancel a download, you can, for example, say "Stop Downloading". To cancel a setting, you can, for example, say "Revert Settings".


192

Here's what Facebook does when cancelling a payment subscription (Facebook subscription API). There's no reliance on Yes/No. There's no misleading use of the word cancel. Clear explanation and buttons that clearly define the impending action. Then they clearly confirm what just happened. Skype on the other hand shows what not to do. Much confusion! Edit: ...


99

I would say that "New" is best in most situations, as it is short and distinct. A good rule of thumb is to look at the other options you will have in your menu. You want to make scanning fast, so you want to make each option as distinct as possible. Here is a crude example of what I mean: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


93

No. Trying to give applications personality is one of those things that's just not well thought out. It definitely seems like it's one of those solutions that developers came up with and never user tested. In a classic UI UX failure, developers came up with the talking paper clip solution in response to this same issue: https://archive.org/details/g4tv.com-...


91

You can't force them to read something, but you can: Mitigate the cases where they're instinctively skipping it. Remove the benefit for those intentionally skipping it. As Alan Cooper puts it in About Face, you need to "hide the ejector seat lever" and break their flow. TL;DR: Users who intentionally skip instructions should be held accountable....


88

"Like" is Facebook's creation and is strongly associated with Facebook. +1 is Google+'s creation and is totally associated with its brand. Thinking out of the box... It seems your functionality is not exactly the same as "liking". It's more "like & follow". There is no single word for that, so alternatively you could invent your own vocabulary. ...


76

Ok I might be on to something: "New" is good for buttons that take the user to a clean "canvas", where the user can add his content. "Create" is good for buttons that "submit" the user's content or input (either into a database or to some public platform). In other words, "New" doesn't suggest that you're actually creating anything. It just sets the stage ...


69

If you feel like jumping the action (click/tap) you can directly say "Select" the ... Rather than a generic word, I would suggest you try to check what device the person is using and then say "click/tap" appropriate for the platform. But, then come the devices with both, a peripheral device and touch capability, which make this situation awkward-ish. You ...


57

Let them know what has happened. Here are some situations with longer, clear example notifications that use proper English grammar: Only the name changed The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy". Only the data changed The task "foobar" has been successfully updated. The name and the data changed The task "foobar" has been ...


54

We are not talking about Facebook visitors, but professional users in the business environment. Simply hire people who understand what they are doing. No UX improvement can be a replacement for that.


53

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


52

The idea of 'click here' being a bad idea originated from data about how people visually scan web pages which show that people don't read online: they skim the page to get the key information. If someone is scanning, 'click here' (particularly if there are lots of them!) links are totally meaningless in isolation: the user has to spend time reading around ...


50

A good error message should: Let you know what the problem is. Make you feel like there is something that you can do about it. Speak like a human, and be a consistent extension of the personality of the rest of the application. For generic error messages, you can't do much about the first point, but you can do something about the other two. Do something ...


50

AP style says "spell out whole numbers below 10, and use figures for 10 and above". Chicago Manual style says spells out numbers below 100, or as an alternative rule to use AP style instead. Nielsen Norman Group says, basically, to heck with the old rules; everybody just skims online anyway so use figures for all specific numbers, because people notice ...


47

Personally I like love which is often represented by an icon of a heart and popular in social media. Then you dont have to write the word love but simply use the heart. But if you don't like the heart icon, you can always find a synonym from Thesaurus.com:


46

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


44

If it's clear, say it in the least number of words possible. If there is no confusion, then there is no problem. "Import image" - clear. "Create app" - clear. "Add description" - clear. For further reading, I suggest the Android Writing Style.


43

Name the buttons for what they do. If the default is "cancel", then cancel the cancel should be something simple like "Don't cancel". I know that it's not ideal to use the word 'cancel' in both of them, but it's the clearest option in this unique situation, and clarity is far more important. Edit: Some good suggestions from the comments below are to ...


41

Rewording I would try my very, very best to avoid using the term 'cancel' for terminating the subscription. Cancel is generally considered to be a safe action. Here, you are using it in a more destructive sense, thus causing the confusion you noticed. If you manage to avoid the term 'cancel' for the actual activity, you can resume to use it for the cancel ...


40

Select or Press Just thinking about it from the perspective of the item. It will be selected/pressed by either the user's finger or the mouse cursor. Either of those work.


38

Designers' over-sensitivity It is easy for designers to overthink things (and equally under-think things). I highly recommend reading this research paper: Petrie, H. & Power, C. (2012). What Do Users Really Care About? A Comparison of Usability Problems Found by Users and Experts on Highly Interactive Websites. Proceedings of Human Factors in Computing ...


37

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


29

What about Star? Google Reader did this and it was pretty clear it went into the Starred Items folder and your friends would also see you starred an item; it also served to bookmark. The other thing I was just thinking is that unless you told people, no matter what term you used it would still be unclear you "liked" that user. That seems totally different ...


27

As a non-native english speaker, I always have found sign in & sign up, VERY confusing, I always click the wrong button. You should avoid Sign up. Login and Logout are not so much confusing


25

I think that this article about the “Sign Up” button is interesting, the author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212%. His thesis is that the standard “Sign Up” buttons don’t work because “they ask for blind commitment” and “do not offer any value”. Visitors also “see common elements repeated on many sites” and “they ...


25

Not according to Microsoft. Use title-style capitalization, without ending punctuation. Source: Microsoft Guidelines for Windows, section about error messages.


25

Don’t make them read it I'm guessing your call center staff is like everybody else's: Unmotivated and paid as little as possible. How do you make them do anything? You do it for them. Record it 🤖 💬 Record the critical messages and embed them in the application. Make the employee click a button to play a recording of the message as part of their ...


24

Keep Subscription Avoid generic defaults (Cancel/Ok, Yes/No): label the buttons with what they actually do! download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Pretend users do not like to read the dialog-text and with luck perhaps 5 or 7 syllables per button. Be short, be clear, use positive imperatives. Avoid negation like "do not ...


23

Some sites show this in the header to indicate a presumed identity for low risk actions (like add to wishlist), but you can't actually buy anything until you log into the site. So "log out" here would be misleading. Sometimes "Not John? Sign out." is shown as in place of 'sign out' when properly signed in. This is simply a more human way of speaking to ...


23

I would go with Dropbox's approach. 'Choose files' is clear enough to tell you the action it performs and concise enough to fit within two words. 'Select files' also works. When labeling buttons, try to explain what the button does. Are choosing files and uploading two steps or a single step? Since in dropbox's case, you choose the files and then press '...


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