227

We want it to feel cheap when we buy but not when we give.


163

This is a constrained behavioral design problem Observations It's similar, but not identical to, a tragedy of the commons problem where participants are able to use and potentially exhause a common resource (in this case, free disposal for garden waste). This is not a problem a UX can solve without broader systemic design, but UX can make a difference. You ...


86

Users generally do prefer targeted ads to untargeted ones, all other things being equal. However, there are other important factors which explain why user reaction is mostly negative overall: Users don't spend all their time purchasing goods on the internet - often they are doing different and completely unrelated tasks, sometimes at the same time. Most ...


85

If the problem is that "...report button is too convenient" and you can't change this (otherwise check Thomas' great answer) then you already have the solution implemented here on Stack Exchange network: Ask them to write why they think the question is broken. Zach Lipton suggests to start only with this rule and implement the others only if required, I ...


73

There are certainly options which make use of UI design and not only input validation. Don't get me wrong: input validation is also a good point, see the other answers. I just think it's not the only way. Consider this as the starting point: The buttons are sized equally, providing the impression that they can be used equally often. As a first improvement,...


72

Because most people living in the western world read from left to right, and that's how they imagine how time passes. It's a good question wether top to bottom would benefit Japanese customers or right-to-left certain Arabic cultures, on the other hand, the cultural influences of western media and western software does change that. It can be easily ...


69

Well, after thinking for about 10 min, I have to agree with you that the second one does prompt the user to fill it up. Although the difference is minimal. For a stronger feeling of "emptiness", you can change the color of the meter according to the amount filled in. 1-2 bars: Red 3-4 bars: Yellow 5-6 bars: Green


56

Practical origins defined our tastes When car finishes became shiny (because they weren't always) [1,2] due to the availability of the required technology and paint materials, it was mostly for practical purposes - cost effectiveness, weather resistance, rain run-off, aerodynamics, ease of cleaning. Consumers found the attention-grabbing gleam of a shiny ...


52

Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


50

The psychology behind the $0.99 was explored in depth in Priceless: The Hidden Psychology of Value, which if you ask for my humble opinion, is a life-changing book. Partly the reason for such price tags is that it translates for many as a 'sale' price. Against it, is that it is typically associated with 'hard sale'. The donation payment system is in its ...


45

One very possible reason for this is adaption and matching with the context in which the progress indicator is shown. Think about it, a progress indicator is usually displayed together with a descriptive text that explains what it is that is being processed. And what do we know about text.. well, for one thing it's written horizontally from left to right (...


44

The point with these kinds of things, where you rely on customer honesty, is twofold. First to make the honest route easy. Second to make the easiest route as honest as possible. I would radically change the process and divide it in to two steps. First step/screen Are you delivering: ☑ Chemicals . . . . . . . . ☑ Construction waste ☐ (Scrap) Metal . . . ...


43

The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


37

Harry Brignull has an interesting post about adding artificial delays to increase perceived value which was inspired by a Hacker News post about locksmiths and their theatrics. In a nutshell: Purposefully adding a delay to a service may increase perceived value. In this case, the trivially longer time that it takes to "like" could possibly give the ...


36

There was a fantastic case put forward a while ago (if I find it I'll edit this answer) that the ideal number is actually 4 stars. The idea is that people naturally gravitate towards the 3 in a 5-star system (or the 2 in a 3-star system) because it's easy. Go ahead and look at your iTunes library; if you're anything like me you have squillions of 3s. By ...


34

Gamification is a design tool. You might call it a buzzword or a temporal rage but it is gaining proper academic support. The most concise definition that I have come across is: Gamification is the use of game element and game design techniques in a non game context. Gamification needs voluntariness (if you are forced in a Points,badge system it is NOT ...


34

Instead of surveying for a particular feature, ask about the pain point the feature should solve. A great question would be something like "What is the worst thing about our app?" And then give three options. Remember, users are crap about giving good suggestions about solutions, but nobody knows their problems more than they do.


32

There could be a hardware related answer too. Before the GUI there was the DOS prompt/terminal interface. Progress bars here would have been rendered with characters, e.g. dots or filled squares. When coding it's far easier to show progress as growing from the left of the screen to the right because you can calculate the place the next character goes quite ...


31

You could always try asking your users to prioritize a list of 5 or 6 features - That way you're not asking "would you like to have X?" but "Which is more important to you U, V, W, X, Y, or Z?" There's still a little of the confirmation bias there but you're also asking the user to trade off one feature for another and so reducing the effect of the bias.


28

This disparity is likely due to a variety of factors: It's not clear exactly how many colors humans can see. For example, the table at the top of this page about the number of colors distinguishable by the human eye cites various academic papers as saying anything from "more than 100,000" to "roughly 10 million." In any case, the number of colors visible ...


28

I previously designed/tested an application similar to FanDuel/DraftKings that included both points and cash as a reward. With the points system, the user could accumulate points - lose them or have them stay the same. At a later time, we also included cash as a reward system as well. (Users could choose cash or points as their reward) From a testing ...


26

Some people have a great memory for words, other people a great memory for faces. Some have both or neither. Some avatars can be completely generic and difficult to remember, such as Gravatar's autogenerated avatars. Others can be very unique and memorable. Your DVK example is a good one. Some usernames can be completely generic, such as this site's "...


24

I don't have much in the way of hard data to back this up, but a number of sites which host user-generated links (eg. news aggregators, Wikipedia) specifically ban shortened URLs for trust reasons. Joshua Schachter (creator of Delicious) wrote a blog post explaining some of the issues with them.


24

You shouldn't lie to your users. If the issue is a 404, don't use language that implies it's a 500; the server's not broken, and that page may never exist. There's no reason you can't use user-friendly language to communicate the actual issue, however. Plenty of sites use 404 language that apologize in human-friendly language for the page not existing, and ...


24

Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


24

The fact that your users submit pointless feedback is good. The far harder problem in collecting feedback is getting them to do it at all. Please improve the UX of your flag reviewers, not your flag submitters. Do they have tools to skip short feedback? Redundant feedback? Is the feedback grouped by category using even procedural language processing ...


23

One possible approach is to embrace the fact that the users aren't going to be completely objective while voting. And so you could try using a more explicit voting system, ie. more choices and more specific than the generic "like/dislike"-"upvote/downvote" pattern. The perfect example for this is BuzzFeed's rating system: Update: Another alternative is ...


23

The psychology behind the $99 was explored in depth in Priceless: The Hidden Psychology of Value, which if you ask for my humble opinion, is a life-changing book. 9 is the Magic Number A price such as $99, or $14.95 are known as charm price. Research suggests that the most effective charm price is that ending with 9. A University of Chicago/MIT research (...


22

I tend to agree with you - the one on the right tempt me more. But I think it depends a bit on the increments in which you get credits. I wouldn't feel very motivated if the credits build up slowly. But that is the same with both of the options. I guess with the option on the right, it feel like 6 big steps to get to 250 and on the left it is just 250 very ...


22

If you ask me, you can give a rough approximation of the actual quantity. Don't exaggerate too much. Suppose you have 1379 books. You don't say you have 2000 books. That's just too much. Also, you wouldn't want to reveal the correct number either. Just speak out these sentences to a friend and ask him which sounds the best, which I believe will be the one I ...


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