Hot answers tagged

62

That is exactly how it is done. What usually happens is that the description of the company itself, the open position and the candidate requirements alone are more than enough to fill a screen. Sometimes there's legal lingo – equal opportunity etc – or a map showing the location of the office. If you place non-sticky buttons top and bottom, people won't ...


14

A lot depends on the visual design of the screen. If there is enough visual distance between their placement it might be useful to the user. They won't have to scroll to use the button, nor remember its existance. But if they are visible at the same time, it can become confusing.


5

Outline buttons (Ghost buttons) have a particularly clean, subtle look, work with almost any design. Some designers use them on elegant, sophisticated designs. I like to use these buttons as secondary buttons. There’s no color fill so it won’t take attention away from the main action (for example like cancel buttons). In most cases, using outline button as ...


5

The general shape (horizontal square) and position of the primary button (right above the fold) creates a false bottom. So the problem here is that the user is not aware that there is another button below the primary one and will have to discover it. Once the secondary button gets discovered by scrolling down, users should understand the CTA belongs to ...


4

Should it be a complex service with a lot of description on your site that a user would like to get back to, I would err on a side of opening the link in a new tab. But since it is a quite simple app, plus the description in the Play store will probably include the same or even more info about it, I suggest opening the link in the same tab. Note that it ...


4

Alternatively, the height of the image at the top could be sacrificed to make space for the content below. A smaller image would serve the same purpose. Below 300px, the elements may be scaled down slightly to render in normally, as you have mentioned already. Or, use the image as background and overlay the text and buttons. There are multiple ways to ...


4

I think the best solution for you is as the following: 1- Try to Shorten the long title for every button but taking out the redundant words. 2- The buttons must have the same place even on a small screen, for a better experience, changing the location of buttons is a big enemy for usability. and this will reduce the visits to your app. 3- What you need to ...


3

I'm going to assume that you that you are not referring to ALL call to action buttons and that you are not using the same color for all states. Consistency is important. If you're using a green color then be consistent. But keep in mind there are different types of CTAs and there may very well be a need to differentiate them. (In which case keeping a ...


3

Welcome to UXSE! From a quick Google search on CTAs I found this article that analyzed ~37000 Facebook ads and also made their own A/B/C testing. They compared "Learn More", "Sign Up" and "Download". The average click-through rate of call-to-actions was 0.906% for “Learn More,” 1.005% for “Sign Up” and 1.001% for “Download.” These numbers are almost ...


3

I would consider using a slightly transparent and blurred background, similar to what Apple does with the "background-blur" property for their tab bar element in native apps, to hint to the user that additional fields lie just underneath the main CTA callout. Leveraging another native app approach, use angled or caret up and down elements in the overlay for ...


3

It seems like trying to detect device height to ensure that your elements sit halfway under a floating element would be getting into a whole can of worms, so I'll offer a couple solutions that would remove the need for that: Stick the CTA to the left or right of the screen If it's positioned without the standard content margin, then it won't appear to be a ...


3

The text with all capital letters help the button stand out visually. For a call to action button this is important. There is an article by UX Planet about it, that says: Use capitalization where you need to shout-out an important message, something which you can’t afford your users to miss.


3

Depending on what your site does, you could provide helpful links on the page (maybe see what the most visited pages are). If it is a complex website, try including a search box like Mailchimp does. Check out this link. Hope it is helpful. https://uxplanet.org/6-best-practices-for-404-pages-with-killer-ux-d9305db19ad9


3

While many brands have started to use 404 pages as places to showcase their personality and/or inject a bit of humor, a 404 is still an error. The primary purpose of an error message is to help the user recover. It's best not to think of it as a landing page that requires a singular, specific CTA. As you probably know, a 404 is caused by either a malformed ...


3

I think you should avoid having two different continue buttons as this just adds confusion to the user as they need to work out which one they should click. This is made even more confusing if one of the continue buttons actually has different functionality depending on the text. My suggestion would be to handle the default option by making it a selectable ...


2

Here's a GoodUI design idea and A/B test report that indicates an 84% increase in clicks due to repeated calls to action: idea 5: Repeating Your Primary Action The idea here is that a soft call at the top and prominent call at the bottom, after the user has reviewed the content, are helpful, but to balance the number of repeated calls with the length of the ...


2

Ultimately it will be personal preferences unless you test it during user tests. What you can change? you'll have to find the right balance between: Reduce the font size Make the button multiline (max 2 for readability) Change your label to something more concise ('Plan dinner') I think you have it all.


2

A call to action is often used to get a user to commit to a particular path, oftentimes a conversion or sale. (Proceeding to a future task; i.e. a Sales Funnel) They are often spoken of in the context of marketing & sales. For instance, on a homepage for a product: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The example you ...


2

In your example after selecting one color there is no clear affordance which one is selected. Is it the greyed out one or the one that is still visible? But the biggest problem is that red isn't red anymore and you are relying on the user to remember what it is. The buttons also don't communicate that just one can be selected (and mutually exclude the ...


2

Perhaps you could disable the Submit button until all required fields are filled out, and test for false floors on different viewport heights.


2

The key to effectively chunking content (text as well as images, graphics, videos, buttons, and other elements) is to keep related things close together and aligned (in accordance with the Law of Proximity in Gestalt psychology). -nngroup - The Isolation Effect (also known as the Von Restorff Effect) is the tendency to recall something that stands out in ...


2

I was struggling with almost the same problem (see my post). In the end it became clear to me that with a more direct approach a skip button is not necessary. I liked the solution where you don't repeat the final goal (starting the chat) and instead of adding a skip button, making the skippable screen optional: PRO: quicker interaction for people who do ...


2

I faced similar problem, reduced the height of the image for low resolution devices - It helps users to make decisions (obvious always wins - then hidden - I understand it is not hidden purposefully), The word "Browse" appears twice/back to back in CTAs which can be avoided, then you can have the CTAs side by side


2

Without seeing the larger context of your UI and your use case, the advantage of a larger hit area is that the user 'click' or select the CTA from a larger hit area. Look into Fitt's law Fitts’ law states that the amount of time required for a person to move a pointer (e.g., mouse cursor) to a target area is a function of the distance to the target ...


2

Seems filled CTA is better. Outlined button is often reffered as Ghost button, so if you google with that term you will find results. https://goodui.org/leaks/booking-a-b-tests-ghost-buttons-but-their-hopes-fade-away-as-predicted/ https://uxplanet.org/ghost-buttons-in-ux-design-4cf3717334f8


2

Go back home implies that you're coming from there :) which you're not. I would just use Go Back and send the user to previous page. If they click on the logo they will be sent to Homepage anyway.


2

Consider completion/progress interfaces. One example are language learning applications such as Duolingo, where progress is displayed and the completion of the task is highlighted. Another example is Treehouse, where all the interface is laid out in a progression style. Mimicking the progress of the student across each lesson/stage.


2

welcome. Your instincts are correct that "Add to cart" is definitely a better CTA than "sign up". You'll want to hide the "sign up" button if the user can't sign up. "Add to cart" is fine for the remaining button if there are cues on the page that the webinar happened in the past, and the user can purchase a recording. ...


1

As a user I hate so much this type of notification, just the bubble on the feed it's enough to make I click there because I don't like to have notifications bubble on my screen. But if this is so important for your company I did a suggestion: When click click on the notification or on the feed you should show the 5 articles that you have for your user. ...


1

As long as the button initiates a clear path of action, that seems fine. Active language drives, well, action, and the button is your first step in the journey. You wouldn't want to, say, click an "Enroll Now" button and land on an "About Us" page that had contact information at the bottom. That would be a UX DISASTER!


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible