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4

The rule that radio buttons require a single selection applies to a list of radio buttons, not the whole form. Your form has multiple lists (some as short as two items), so each list is a group of mutually exclusive radio buttons. Within each group of radio buttons, the user can only choose one. When the form is completed, multiple radio buttons are selected ...


3

Typically I would agree it makes more sense grammatically to be at the end of the text, especially if you have a footnote that denotes the meaning of the asterisk. For example: However, I would not be so adamant to say that it must be done this way. There are benefits to having the asterisk at the start. Such as that it will be the first thing the user sees ...


3

You could consider using a calendar picker in which the only selection a user can make is an entire week (as opposed to a typical calendar picker where users can select specific days). This is a pretty standard web convention for dealing with user-input dates. Depending on your use case, it could also be helpful to label the weeks with numbers, and allow ...


2

If it is possible I would reduce the number of optional fields from 5 to 3, for example, but I know that is not always an option. A possible solution for the 11 fields scenario would be to group the 5 optional fields under an expandable menu under the required fields and label this section as OPTIONAL, ADVANCED or something like that. This solution allows ...


2

The important thing here is to consider the use cases. There are a few things to consider, and I think you've hit on probably the main one, eye tracking, and in your example you've given an example with two fields. The reason I mention this is that if you have 1000 fields and only one of them is a number, you should consider how important it is to draw ...


2

Better to reveal all missing info at once. This makes it explicit right away about exactly what's missing. Assuming you have best practices in place to avoid users skipping the required fields in the first place, the user is now in a state where they can make no progress. Highlighting all required (but empty) fields at once gives them the scope of what they ...


1

It might be a better argument to have with your product manager about whether you should be marking fields as required at all. The reason I say this is that asking for optional information should be avoided where possible as it slows up the user when completing a form, even if they don't enter an optional field it makes them think about whether they should ...


1

According to Nielsen Norman, there's a slight benefit to putting it before: Should the asterisk precede or follow the field label? That is unlikely to make a practical difference, but one reason to put it just before the field description is to help the eyes easily locate which fields are required by scanning just the left-most character of the label. ...


1

Option A is the default horizontal alignment in Google Sheets too, but I also see the eye tracking problem that you mention and I think it affects both web and desktop applications. Maybe this alignment is already familiar to some users for cells without label in spreadsheets, but for fields with a label I prefer option B because it allows the user to read ...


1

In my experience, well, it depends. in some cases the process may be improved significantly by using country + zip first. Zip codes are useful for actually extracting most of the address fields, if you dev team has access to publicly available services. This is even more powerful in some cases like the UK where Zip can sometimes even distinguish up to a ...


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