227

This user behaviour indicates a great opportunity to improve the usability of your application. Ask a few users why they rename items and try to understand the underlying need or problem that they are facing. Depending on what answers you get, possible solutions might include: Allow sorting the list in different ways; by date/user/... Allow users to add a ...


124

Rumors of its death are greatly exaggerated... Classic hierarchical folder views aren't dying. But they are being complemented by other ways of viewing and interacting with files. The key trend here is the decoupling of views from the underlying file system. The old world...One truth ⇨ One view Historically, file UX was heavily tied to the underlying ...


64

When it comes to optimising the design, users happen to be the best designers. I would suggest that – instead of guessing - you should get in touch with these Users, who hacked the sorting mechanism to ask what they wanted to achieve. Maybe they wanted just to pin some items to the top of the list, for which starring would probably be enough. But maybe ...


51

It's not dying completely, but it is becoming a power user niche feature. Everyone has seen or heard stories about the user who stores everything on their desktop or in a single My Documents folder. Humans are terrible at justifying a large upfront cost like creating and managing dozens of folders just for a possible, small benefit in the future like being ...


39

The first thing to remember about taxonomies is that there is never one correct taxonomy per set of elements. Imagine having the product set {paper, cotton fabric, old wooden lineal}. For a tailor, the categorization within their taxonomies is: {paper, old wooden lineal} -> pattern making supply, {cotton fabric} -> clothing raw material. For a paper ...


38

Definition The word Taxonomy originated from the work of Carl Linnæus, who created an hierarchy of organisms in the 18th century. The word Taxon means a group of organisms. Since then, the word has been used to describe a multitude of classification schemes, mainly ones with strict hierarchy. While definitions do exist, the term is often abused. However, ...


33

The concept is indeed very badly explained, but as a rather abstract concept that can be applied in many ways, you would expect that. I'll use learning as an example here. Multi-channel The idea is that a complete experience can be realised using only one of a few possible channels (or media). For instance, if I wish to learn about Task Analysis, I can ...


32

Teacher: How to visually format questions/answers to easily follow the story? Student: I think that using "T" as prefix for Teacher and "S" as prefix for Student may help. You may also use the full word (see also) at the beginning. Do not omit this if roles can be inverted or the flow will be soon unclear (unless this is your creative intent.) Consider to ...


15

Powered by ACompanyName is old school and doesn’t provide any real benefit to the user. That said, there are still companies and consultants who discount their hosting or development services in exchange of the powered by statement. It can be treated like any other commercial placement, or a more sublime placement as in the footer. This is subject of ...


15

Categorization of content is still very important, even after the rise of smartphones. Whether that's by date, by location, or by tags. The more and more popular use of smartphones since 2007 has forced designers to come up with simpler user experiences. Manually putting stuff in folders can usually be considered a bad UX experience, which is why in a lot ...


15

Most people tend to think that certain aspects of technology die away, but I always get the feeling that it is far more common for it to "sediment". Whenever I see a new trend, it usually never ends like "this is the new best way". Normally it is more like "we solved this problem with one global solution, but now it seems there are different solutions for ...


14

It's very common on surveys to give some idea of a typical time that it may take for it to be filled out. After all, surveys can take quite some time and you can't typically gauge how much there is to do. That time should not be how long it takes you to fill out, but should be taken as an average of how long it takes real people to fill it out for real. ...


14

As well as pinning items to the top of the list, fake-alphabetical entries can be used to pin them to the bottom (a trivial example: I use a contact called ZZ spam with a silent ringtone on my phone). In other words it's quite a flexible system. Consider how sorting by a range of parameters is built in so widely: All file managers allow you to get the ...


14

I'm not sure what tone you're going for, but I'd consider going with a chat-style UI, with one person's speech aligned on the left, and the other (perhaps the one with which you'd like your reader to identify) on the right. This pattern is widely recognized as an exchange between two (or more) people. If you'd still like the questions to be easily scannable,...


13

In short: No, because it makes it harder for the user to find an entry in the list. In long: Many alphabetised lists use a slightly non-standard collation, in order to make the lists easier to use. Example 1: When listing people, they are almost always sorted by surname (Smith, John, Mr) even though the surname is the last name as normally printed (Mr John ...


12

Here's what I think regarding your questions, one by one. 1- When is it appropriate to tell users that "this may take time"? I plan on displaying a confirmation modal with their list of content and a message. FYI: There is no way to show an exact completion time, but a range is possible. A good analogy is to think about it is to imagine the product owner ...


12

Adding to @DesignerAnalyst's answer. Here are some parameters you may want to consider before selecting the metaphor, Amount of data for each record: If the data includes text, images, actions then a card layout will help the user to read more easily. Time spent on each record: It basically correlated with the data you are showing. If user spends time ...


11

I'm not so sure there's a huge difference from a UX stand-point. If anything, it makes it more difficult. Let's say a user is on your site and is at www.sub.example.com/articles/article-title.php, and he wants to go to your homepage. Users often clear the address bar, so he would click in the address bar, clear the end of the URL, and be left at www.sub....


11

Probably. But it's a slow painful death. It essentially boils down to the need to put something somewhere where we can find it again, or where we can direct someone else to finding it. We are naturally predisposed to putting things in containers or compartmentalizing in such a way that even if it's a long time before we come back then we can still have a ...


10

Jabob Nielsen in his article URL as UI from 1999 highlights the importance of human-friendly and hackable URLs. Updates from 2005 and 2007 mentioning eye-tracking studies suggesting that people pay attention to URL. Another article by NNGroup, Navigation: You Are Here states that: Well-chosen, human-readable web addresses are important to sharing, ...


9

Short Answer: They never intersect, as described, at a single "hail mary" point. They are different elements of the same process and should coexist together as part of that process. In the cases where one may be dependent on the other, the most ideal situation is that Information Architecture would guide the Software Architecture. Long Answer: ...


9

It sounds like your real problem isn’t designing how to show a link is non-reversible. Your real problem is your app has committed the cardinal sin of breaking the Back button, which is an issue going beyond how you mark links in each list item. Solving the Real Problem Solutions, from most to least preferred: Fix the Back button. Okay, you say that the ...


9

When users add special characters to the beginning of the names they create two or more kind of objects, or categories, in the sort. These categories can be specific, as the ones in this example, or more general ones like favorite / not_favorite or objects_I_am_working_on / others. You could provide the feature to make this distinction, to categorize ...


8

Providing this sort of helpful information is a good way to help reduce the angst visitors feel toward an unknown/uncomfortable process. Red in forms often indicates something is required, is wrong, or is a warning. I wouldn't use that color. Instead, Blue is a cool color often used for information and notes in interfaces. An alarm clock may indicate to ...


8

How about the same circles but with numbers inside dictating the number of issues for that spot, you could provide an instant visual indicator of the types of jobs by colouring the circle: Red = Electrician Orange = Plasterer Possible downsides, multiple jobs and states say plumber, plasterer, electrician and painter may produce as busy circle. The ...


8

Search helps if you know what you are looking for (obvious). If you don't know what you are looking for, a folder structure can help you find it. For example, if you are looking for a recipe for chicken Florentine, search will help you find it, or if you have chicken and want a recipe that uses it, search may help there too. But if you just want to cook ...


7

Find the story in the data--the story that your audience needs and wants to hear. (If the data is boring to you then you haven't found your story yet.) Some questions to help define your purpose: Why does this audience need to know basic info regarding web design/etc.? What will they do with the information? What will they take home to their desk? What is ...


7

Mixed classification in IA can be both appropriate and effective. To begin with, a proper IA should be determined by user-testing. Activities like tree-sorting will reveal that users sometimes expect elements outside the main classification scheme. Generally in UX, consistency should follow usability (a statement that is the source of debate I'd rather not ...


7

Try to play with icons position and ask any designer to work with colors and shapes, it may greatly improve perception of this block, something like this (tuned layout and shapes a bit):


7

I have not seen this pattern employed exactly as you describe. My relevant experience in information-rich webapps stems from enterprise health-monitoring and deployment software, which has a deep navigation hierarchy. In my opinion, the left-navigation and the main content should not both employ accordions. Left hand navigation is typically vertical, and as ...


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