241

No, it's not a good idea. You want to make purchasing from your website as easy as possible. Forcing a user to give out an email address before they're even able to see what you're selling is not a good approach. This will most probably push a big part of your customers away from the site rather than forming a commitment to it. You should read the $300 ...


216

Maybe because they are curious about what is inside this combobox's arrow. Have you tried to change it to another component like a spinner ? I don't have any particular research about it, it is just my guess.


167

If you feel the 'Confirm Email Address' field is required, but want to prevent people copy-and-pasting it then why not take a different approach? When requesting the user details and email address just ask the questions once. Then, on the final sign-up / payment screen (depending on your application) add a field on this last page stating: "We will send ...


124

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


98

I would avoid this behaviour as it's breaking people's basic expectations of being able to copy/paste. October 2011 - an article by blogger, speaker and serial entrepreneur Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten on The Next Web (which he founded) - 10 ways to screw up a web form and piss me off Number 1 - that's number ONE: Don’t ask people to re-type email ...


96

The fact that it's a GIF is really a technical detail and not relevant (or even comprehensible) for most users. What you need to convey to them is that there is more data available. Technically, it would probably even make more sense to use actual video rather than GIFs, depending on the size and content of the animation. One option is indeed to overlay a "...


91

Usability aside, there are also some technical points against your strategy: Basically, you are sending spam to your users. The content of your site is hidden behind a login page - that makes it unsearchable. In many sites, the absolute majority of traffic comes from search results and price comparison sites (like Google Shopping). Similarly, the content of ...


83

Etsy spent quite some time developing and testing infinite scroll in their search listings. They noticed fewer clicks on results and fewer items favourited from the infinite results page, and users stopped using the search interface to find products. They reverted back to traditional pagination. There's a good article about it here: http://danwin.com/2013/01/...


83

I don't think multiple clicks are a bad thing in the shopping cart. While here, some users will double check things. Unless you're seeing users drop out, I wouldn't worry about it. If you want to understand why they're doing it, some think-aloud usability tests will tell you. (Don't ask them, after the fact, to remember why they did it; listen to their ...


79

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling employees,...


76

From a non-UX designer perspective: It looks like your €2.499,00 is crossed out while being replaced and highlighted by €650,00. This would be jarring to anyone who was expecting and prepared to pay €2.500,00, but then seeing a price that is considerably lower. If I could save €1.849,00 on a purchase I would definitely do everything I could think of to make ...


75

The Three-tier Pricing Strategy always works because often customers don't know what they need. So in one simple chart, you show them what they can get for different prices. They feel like they have a choice and do not feel like they are being swindled. You want to do business by making the majority of them choose the intermediate one. Much like many ...


63

There is no universal answer to this question, as which is a more important factor in a buying decision varies depending on: price; type of user; perceived quality; and type of purchase. Price In general price matters more for lower valued items and discount matters more for higher valued items Type of user Based on A/B testing and discussions with other ...


50

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't. Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In ...


41

...would the shop designer want shoppers to enter and walk as quickly as possible between shelves, or rather design the route so that shoppers are encouraged to stop, look, turn, discover... etc? Your analogy is flawed. Even if I walk slowly through a grocery store, my eyes are taking in thousands of pieces of information at a time. I have a panoramic, ...


39

Yes your solution is good and will work, but it gets problematic if someday you introduce videos to your site. Also if people see the Play-Button they expect a video (longer then a gif) which usually also provides sound and better quality. You could use a facebook style approach for this. If you want it more obvious for your user you could use "Play GIF" ...


38

No. Forcing the user to enter an email address before they can view your products will more than likely drive them away, for the following reasons: Increased barrier to entry to your site - resulting in a dramatic reduction of "eyes on the prize". It's suspicious. The user will wonder why you're asking for their email address to just see your website. You ...


38

(See the comments for a lively debate about this idea!) I disagree with the other answers here. (There are 5 at the moment.) Like all good design answers: it depends. In 99% of cases, you'll want to put off on gathering information for as long as possible. But there are a few very good reasons you would want to collect information first. It all depends on ...


37

I like to take informed decisions myself, so I recommend (1). If you keep me from deleting my account (to stop those annoying newsletters, for example), even if I am willing to lose money, I'd be really angry. The really user-friendly offer (just to mention this :-) would be to offer to transfer my credit (to another store, to my bank). That's what I would ...


36

The question that was not asked directly: Should we hide the main navigation in the checkout process? Yes, we should hide it. A merchant wants to hide the main navigation mainly because of the conversion rate (ratio between people entering the checkout process and the ones actually finishing it). For average users the checkout process can still be ...


34

From the non-technical users standpoint, it is a video. The lack of sound does not change that. No need to explain the difference - just say it will play a video when you press the button.


31

Booking.com experimented with it, conversion dropped immensely. Everything they do there is A/B-tested. I wish I could share statistics, but those are documented internally so you'll just have to take this anecdotal evidence for what it is: something a guy on the internet posted. That said, the reason no large e-commerce websites use it means that it doesn'...


31

There are a few reasons behind this... Implicit Option If a customer is deciding whether to choose your product or not, and there is a single option available, then the choice is binary. They can choose to buy it or not. If you present 3 choices, then they tend to forget about the implicit option to not buy the product. Centre Stage Effect When 3 ...


28

This kind of UI elements exists and is used in many applications even if differently. Facebook events Google calendar If well designed they are even more affordant than the usual radio buttons. The thing is, because of this affordance they seem "auto selected" so there is no need of a validation like in your example. Therefore I would say radio buttons ...


27

This is a tricky interaction, mostly because it has to be super intuitive since the end users are not computer savy. I know it because I´ve had to deal with it in the past :) I had the same problem while working in the UX team at 11870.com (a recomendations website similar to Yelp), this is the way we handled it, might not be the ideal solution but it ...


27

It's explained in Amazon's website, in this page Why don't we show the price?: Retailers like Amazon have the legal right to set their own prices independently, but some manufacturers place restrictions on how those prices may be communicated. Because our price on this item is lower than the manufacturer's "minimum advertised price," the ...


27

If you can, perform some testing and gather information about why are users clicking on the amount dropdown. Probably most users are clicking for the same reason. That said, my guess is that it might not be absolutely clear that what there is behind the dropdown are plain numbers: 1 2 3 ... and users might think there could be other kind of options: 1 1 ...


26

Since the email field is unmasked, the confirmation seems redundant to users. If the user is advanced enough to copy and paste instead of retyping, the user probably knows his/her address. Preventing copy and paste would just annoy users. When the user copies the email, the user has to look at what he wrote and thus would probably notice a mistake, ...


25

There are factors outside of how users behave on your site that might determine whether you use one or the other. For comparison sites or shopping searches it's important to get a high listing and a low headline price often helps - the first challenge is getting people to visit your site. High traffic with higher dropout is normally more profitable than ...


24

A single button should perform an action, and not act as a radio button. If you want buttons to act as radio buttons, you should use a segmented button. There is established precedent for this in both mobile and web UI, so people are likely to already understand what they do. Additionally the design of segmented buttons shows that the buttons are related ...


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