129

Imagine... ...walking up to a storefront. As you begin to open the door, an employee pulls the door closed from the inside. The employee begins shouting through the door. Though muffled, you can make out the following question: DO YOU ALREADY KNOW WHAT KINDS OF THINGS WE SELL, OR WOULD YOU LIKE TO COME IN AND LOOK AROUND AS A NEW SHOPPER? Your first ...


87

Typing on mobile is a very arduous and unpleasant process, so we should try keeping it to a minimum. Sometimes your users will have made just a small error that can be fixed by replacing or adding a character or two (typically they typed something instead of @ in an email address etc.). Sometimes they will have made a big error and they need to retype the ...


86

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


85

The three dot symbol is called an 'ellipsis' and has been used in text since at least 1588 Originally it signified a pause or tailing off in speech but, in modern times, it also signifies and implied continuance of any textual content. An example of the modern usage might be in webpages where you sometimes find "More after the jump..." meaning that an ...


84

My guess is that your users don't understand the function of "Continue as a new user" button and click on Sign in thinking that they could probably register there. Would you consider renaming the button to "Continue without an account" Also I'd consider adding a sign up button in case the user just wants to sign up! :)


53

MSN Messenger Service How do you feel about the typing indicator—“David is typing”—that appears on your buddy’s screen while you’re composing a message in chat? Does it make you feel self-conscious about how long you’re taking to write a message? Do you hate it when you are multitasking and your erstwhile best friend keeps sending messages like “...


52

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


43

Honestly speaking, just from personal experience I'd probably click the sign in button too (not purposely of course) It's just conditioning from all the garbage apps, sites, whatever, that have that giant button which is usually some stupid scam or random useless button used to grab attention and coax people into clicking it (and it does something annoying),...


40

Generally speaking you should always try to avoid forcing users into doing things, and avoid putting in place barriers that slow down or inhibit access to them to actually use your software to achieve things. On top of that from the user perspective its a bit harsh to require that they have to provide personal information just to be able to export to PDF. ...


36

Approach 1:- Extreme low and high values can be discouraged by color doing the slider using gradient coloring, as shown below:- Green color in the center to indicate permissible and safe value, ends are colored red to indicate permissible but unsafe values. colors should be linearly transitioned from green to red, since there is no clear demarcation ...


35

Make the title of the workout the same as the active click colour, so that it prompts users to click on the title. Even if the whole card is active - it gives the user something to focus on.


33

I think that the idea of an item partially visible (sol 1) is nowadays something acquired (it comes from windows metro UI, back in 2010!). In my opinion to make it look less bugged you should try to use on the list of items a gradient to transparent on the border and maybe to do the same on the left side (and creating a "ring" of items that circles the ...


28

People with Parkinson Disease (or PD as it's also known) need special considerations as you correctly figured. However, keep in mind that most of those considerations are covered by special peripherals rather than specific UI. As a matter of fact, just following common WAI- ARIA guidelines is more than enough. Keep in mind that, like many people with ...


24

Smartphones are difficult to use for older people Older people are not stupid, there are some very good reasons why they still choose basic cellphones instead of smartphones (and for those who do own a smartphone - why they don't use the full potential). Smart phone usage among Canadians The screen is too small for people with vision problems. The small ...


24

From a usability point of view, definately keep their entry there. There is nothing more annoying to users, in our experience, than clearing their entry on failing validation. They need to be able to see what they have done wrong, and if you clear it they are having to use their memory.


23

but I fell that users would like it better if the app had a consistent design across all platforms Do a lot of your users carry around iPhones, Androids and Windows phones and use them interchangeably? Probably not. And if they did, they're likely power users already familiar with the different OS idiosyncrasies anyways. Point being, from a user ...


22

The iPhone 5/5s/se size. There are three key reasons: More people today still own the smaller 4-inch model than the larger models. That's also not likely to change thanks to the lifespan of the iPhone and the recent release of the iPhone se. So unless you are targeting only people with larger phones, best to stick with smaller and scale up, not the opposite....


21

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. "...


19

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


19

To expand on Tohsters answer, one hamburger menu is already detrimental enough so adding a second one is only going to confuse matters more. If the client cannot be persuaded to follow other avenues then it's probably best to start looking at ways to make the best of a bad situation. (this blog post expands on this https://lmjabreu.com/post/why-and-how-to-...


18

I think Marco T's answer is an excellent solution for your first option. I'd like to offer a solution for your second suggestion Give a arrow pointing on the right and when user taps on it, the list will scroll to the left but that it not natural. If something is horizontal scrollable people will scroll it horizontally by swiping horizontal Why not offer ...


17

If your have to ask for an e-mail address due to business reasons, then I would recommend doing these things to make the experience better: Make an opt out button. If you don't add this, then people who want to opt out will just enter a fake e-mail address and you won't know how many sign-ups are real. Adding it makes the user experience more friendly. This ...


17

Are the users trying to "Sign in" using their Google account? Users may want to use their Google account for apps on their phone and "Sign in" is closer to that action than "Continue as new user", which has the connotation of creating an account (email, password, email to verify, etc.).


16

People sometimes recommend against cyclic navigation from a UX perspective is because the user might have to backtrack quite far to get to the original page they were looking at. Is this really a problem? No, not in practice. In fact, most apps which revolve around discoverability have cyclic navigation. For example, the iTunes, eBay and Amazon apps: The ...


15

The reasons why it's horrid in terms of UX are obvious, but there's actually a very easy way to tell your client why you can't do it: Apple will reject it. I once developed an iPad app where the client forced me to include a prompt for an email address at application boot that couldn't be cancelled. Apple promptly rejected the application due to that and ...


15

Generalising between platforms I would go with the following basic guidelines, they further emphasise a disabled field with a grey background. Normal (with a value) Black text, white background, black border. Normal (with a placeholder) Grey text, white background, black border. Disabled Grey text, slightly lighter grey bg, grey border. E.g.


15

This is a terrible idea You're right to be suspicious. One hamburger already sucks... Hamburger menus don't test very well to begin with. Here is Apple's UX lead on the subject, and more articles here and here, but to summarize: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is placed ...


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