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Option 1: Keep only Login in the4 navbar A common pattern that is used across the board is the use of only the Login CTA in the nav bar. Once in the login screen, the user is given the option to Sign Up or Register if they didn't have an account. Example: Option 2: Keep both, but don't make them buttons Keep both the Login and the Sign Up in the nav bar ...


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Your users will not want to navigate to the page just to find out what the title is. If I saw "Practical En...", I would not know what that page is. I'd rather have more space dedicated to navigation so I could read the full titles. There are many patterns for navigation out there and can be found with some web searches, but they can vary greatly ...


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It`s hard to come with an answer with the lack of details but here are the factors to consider. What are the 8 categories in OPT 1 and what are the 3 categories in OPT 2 and how did you decide upon ? For example in an ecommerce when deciding on categories we could put a broad category Electronics that includes PC and TV or we could create two ...


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Yes, there is a rule of thumb applied when placing most the interaction heavy CTA into the bottom bar or in the lower half of the phone. As they the easiest and most accessible area for the mobile. For Example, Uber, lift, google maps or other apps have their most interactive CTA in the lower area. Here an image for better understanding the interactive ...


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Everything depends of the user expectation. When more and more companies doing it, more people will know that the lik is on the bottom. But take care! In an e-commerce, no problem, people are looking for pproducts and not about us. After decided which product will buy and which store the user will buy, they will search for about page if they think it's ...


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