143

Yes. There is a very simple, effective heuristic that adjusts to the preference of each user. Place a check box in the warning message dialog that says: Don't show this message again Which can be improved further by stating where that dialog can be reenabled.


129

"Recovered" is a poor choice of words here. All that app is trying to do is warn people that the action is not reversible and they can't simply hit cancel or undo and all their files will be returned. A better solution would be: Formatting SD card will delete all data. This action cannot be undone. Continue? This is more direct to the point that you ...


62

These are Confirmation messages - Windows have a fairly detailed page on their guidelines. The whole of that page is pretty useful but here's some excerpts (emphasis mine): Confirmations are most useful when the action requires the user to make a relevant and distinct choice that can't be made later. That choice often involves some element of risk that ...


59

Is there any chance the label pictogram is actually 10x10mm? Guidance on Labelling and Packaging Version 2.0 - September 2016 states in section 5.2 (Size of the label and of the label elements) that for a package of capacity less than or equal to 3 litres, the pictogram (in this case the flammable hazard pictogram) must be not smaller than 10x10mm and if ...


30

I see no problem with the message that other suggestions completely solve. Formatting SD card will delete all data. Data cannot be recovered. Continue? Data cannot be recovered gives a very good sense of urgency, and speaks well to the target audience who at this juncture needs to know the likely worst case scenario. Even though the data can be recovered,...


29

I'm surprised nobody brought up the Mac OS X shut down dialog. It presents you with an "Are you sure?" window, but has a timer so that if the user walks away, expecting the computer to have shut down, it will while still allowing the user time to cancel.


23

This may be a case of the more you make users work, the less they try. I believe when confronted with a task, like trying to understand some content on a page, users do a quick estimate on whether the effort will be worth it or not. Too often we present users with extensive content and clicking just to tell them something that they already know or don’t ...


19

I would recommend clearly going with an approach which clearly calls out the the potential impact of the action they are going to provide and require them to provide a second level of confirmation. The second level of confirmation can be perhaps done by using a checkbox (like how you have in terms and condition boxes) and then only enabling the delete or ...


17

Common patterns to indicate draggability: Drag handles This goes towards affordance. Users need to be able to recognize something can be dragged just by looking at it. A "grippy surface" is a common metaphor for this. Cursor A grab-hand makes sense as well as the arrows (move) cursor. Currently grab is Webkit-only. Also note that some devices don't have a ...


16

In this case since the user has tried to upload an invalid format, regardless that it is optional, it counts as an error. Warnings and Errors can be defined as such: WARNINGS should appear when users are about to do something that is destructive or when the result of an action is unexpected, but isn't an error. And ERROR messages are used to inform ...


15

Really good question. I've thought about this inaccuracy (although in a security, not UX context) and had to explain to several colleagues that most "delete" options (yes, even formatting a drive) are not secure and that the data is quite often recoverable. I have never found it difficult, nor has anyone failed to understand, that the way to think about ...


14

There are 3 cases. The destructive action Do you want to delete this file? Don't. Just do the action, and display a confirmation snackbar (non-blocking small widget somewhere where it is visible but not in the way of operating) that allows to cancel (then, either delay the action, or make sure you can revert it easily). The question can only be ...


12

Playing sounds can be useful when showing error messages, information dialog boxes etc. However... It is not the responsibility of your application to force the user to hear these sounds. This is something that must be configurable by the user, and since most operating systems already have such a configuration possibility, I see no added value in creating ...


10

This file will be uploaded even if there are warnings because the warnings are solved by the application itself. By referring to your sentence above, would it be worth allocating that much of space and users attention to something that a system can solve itself? Update: Want to shift this @Mike's comment in answer - "See 349 warnings fixed ...


9

This is known as "microcopy" in the UX world. A couple of good resources include http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/06/17/five-ways-prevent-bad-microcopy/ Nielsen-Norman group has a number of articles and training conferences on writing for the web: http://www.nngroup.com/topic/writing-web/ One of the big problems with form fields and validation, ...


9

This is a common UX situation Most users 'self police' and do not need warnings or guidance. You have few heavy users who need to be [gently warned/dissuaded] to avoid waste or abuse. You have isolated cases of abusive users. This heavily skewed distribution of users is very common in lot of applications (cell phone usage, all you can eat buffets, Netflix ...


9

I'm a big proponent of not showing messages blocking users from doing what they intended to do. The UX solution with confirmation popups came from the Stone Age of computer UX practices. It originates from a correct assumption that if we have a critical resource, we should not let users damage it by an accident. However, an accident is called that way ...


9

I would not ask the user if he's sure, i would assume he is and explain him his actions. I like invisions approach, they even added checkboxes so they make 100% sure that if you delete you delete because you want to delete and are 100% sure what this means. Of course for smaller actions or actions that get used frequently checkboxes could be annoying since ...


8

There are two important things I could read through: 1) 99% users do not have trouble 2) Explicit warning message is needed So considering both cases, you could go with Option 4, but additionally have a check box in the modal pop-up, that could say "I am aware of this. Do not show me this warning next time" or something of the likes. A regular user could ...


8

The process is successful, but there are warnings detected What you have is Notice1 + Notice2 + Action. Product upload successful + There were warnings + View warnings The examples you propose combine these points, but in my opinion you need at least two different elements, which are examples 3 and 4. From these, 3 can cause some confusion as the first ...


7

You asked for an example of an implementation: Wordpress warns the user when it's likely they misspelled their email address. Like you said, this does feel like an error and not a 'soft error'. I agree with @Franchesca that you can use this, but should go for a less threatening color than red. But I wouldn't go for blue. I think orange is a better choice. ...


7

Other than the obvious answer: "re-write your app so it supports common user actions better" You could try manipulating the browser history using new development techniques (usually outside the scope of a UX answer). Otherwise, a JavaScript alert will only fire after the users have tried to leave the page for any reason, which might be confusing to them. ...


7

I know the question is about the text, but in addition to others responses, consider that user don't always read what you have written and can click on a single button as a habit/reflex. Consider adding 2 buttons with exact same formatting to force them process the information


7

Maybe the UX should go in a completely different direction here. Starting with some (always dangerous) assumptions about context: The majority of users landing on this bit of UI are here because they want to re-use the SD card on the same device. They have no intention of removing the SD card, or sharing it with anyone. And many of those users actually hate ...


7

The list states things to DO and NOT to DO. The picture shows the areas where to BE and where NOT to BE. There is no direct relation between Doing things in the Be area and Not Doing things in the Not Be area. Or put in a different way, Do things should be done independently of the area, and Do Not things shouldn't be done independently of the area. It ...


6

Instead of using the clenched fist cursor I would suggest using this instead. or else continue reading. Show it to the user that it's draggable. Like in real life physical Products do. For example the switch on this table lamp here. The grip is enough to tell the user that it's draggable and it can be slided since there is no other reason why to put ...


6

Playing a sound is useful when there's a chance that the user will miss the notification from the application. For example, Skype play a sound everytime you receive a message. Otherwise, there's also the flashy icon that helps the user to notice the message. So, in my opinion the best thing would be use both visual and sound notification. Remember also to ...


6

At a conceptual level an alert is usually a cue used to raise a users attention. For instance a phone may vibrate to send an alert that something requires attention. A warning is usually related to the consequence of an action (or inaction). A warning can be given before or during an action, but not (usually) after. Let's says you're running out of battery....


6

I would suggest "Data will likely be unrecoverable" as having a clear meaning that is unlikely to materially mislead anyone. While it is true that the likelihood of data being truly unrecoverable if nothing is done with the cartridge following the format might not be as high as the adverb "likely" would suggest, few if any users will care about the odds in ...


6

Any Size Now that I have your attention, this might be a blunt statement, but it's intrinsically correct. Whenever you make an user download a file, you need to warn about the possible consequences. As you know, mobile downloads are a beast of its own, and they have rules that don't apply to desktop. They're also affected by: Speed Data Transfer Device's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible