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225

Highjacking expected user flows is bad. If a user closes an app, they expect it to close, not start opening up other apps (even if it's just a browser). Beyond annoying, it can be perceived as untrustworthy. "Oh great, now if I want to open up an app by this developer they're going to keep trying to launch something else. Delete." You could have an exit ...


111

It strikes me that you probably should have researched your userbase before building the site. But hey, you're in this situation now so you need to deal with it as you find it. I am not surprised that hospitals / academic institutions are using IE7. Performing an entire refresh of the OS, browers, hardware etc. is a very costly exercise, so you'll likely ...


99

To answer the question you asked: Keyboard shortcuts tend to be used by only a small subset of people ("power users"). This is a pretty set-in-stone shortcut—if an application responds to CTRL + F, it will (almost) always trigger a "find" feature. Replacing a browser's find-in-page function with anything other than a custom find-in-page ...


77

The historical reason is that that's what the spacebar does in more, the lowest common demoninator (and probably oldest) of text pagers. In more, it makes sense to map the largest key on the keyboard to the most common action: show the next page. In the glory days of more, you couldn't count on mouse scrollwheels, page down buttons, or sometimes even arrow ...


65

From a user's perspective, don't hijack my browser! Please. Don't touch the other software on my computer unless you're making it clear what's about to happen, and I have the option to opt out or opt in. Don't make any obstinate to remove or persistent changes to my computer unless you're clear in explaining and I'm clear in understanding about what is ...


52

What We Know So Far: The first browser did not use Backspace to go back a page: Several Mosaic menu or button functions have keyboard equivalents. Among them: b, equivalent to the Back button Source: http://www.uoxray.uoregon.edu/local/manuals/biosym/discovery/Html_Help/navigating.html First Netscape Navigator (evolved from Mosaic) Did Not Use Backspace ...


51

I don't know how it started but I can add my two cents about what ALL my clients say: $%!$% what the @$#%#% just happened? Why did the page change? Now I have to fill in that form all over again. I would love to see this go away for good, and the first thing I do when building a form laden website is the following jQuery script: var hasfocus = 'false'; // ...


51

Found an article sourcing a study conducted by Google in 2011 in the US. Apparently, 90% of the participants didn't know about it. "90 percent of the US Internet population does not know that. This is on a sample size of thousands," Russell said. "I do these field studies and I can't tell you how many hours I've sat in somebody's house as they've read ...


43

Relax. Don't be the next king of spam. Generally speaking (and I know generalisations are super unpopular around here, so bear with me) you should not be thinking about the first time the user quits your game. That's the first time they have had enough of your game, or are interrupted. These are not people ready to consider your other games. After a ...


42

Windows Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if you use it (or any other browser) to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Ref: Windows XP support has ended It is safe to address this to IT of the hospital that they need to upgrade to at least IE 9 due to safety reasons.


31

The spacebar is the largest key of your keyboard, and is consequently the easiest one to interact with. For that reason, apps tend to use the spacebar for: a simple action: where no input, precision or direction is involved. a repeated action: the spacebar is the easiest to press several times in a row. a "forgivable" action: if you accidentally press it, ...


30

You're asking about bundling ads with your game. Tread carefully. Software that opens a web browser to an advertisement, without the user's consent, is called adware, and it's universally hated. It's perfectly fine to want people to be aware of your other games, but bundling adware with your software is not the way to do it. I've seen some games that "...


29

If you are in a corporate setting, then you have control over your users. There are various ways you can lock them down to what browser they are allowed to use, whether its through an Image, Group Policy, Firewall settings, etc. Now, by you, I obviously mean those in the company that have the permissions to do so. However, if you don't want to jump ...


27

Don't blame the user for their situation. This is not about who's right, and what's correct. The last thing you want to do, from a UX perspective, is judge your users. A modal dialog telling them to upgrade is self-righteous. By expecting your users to know or care about such things as browsers or operating systems you're judging them, and that's how it will ...


22

The interfaces may look very similar to you, but they are constantly evolving, and have been refined for many years. Firefox in particular is very open about their UX process, and how they rely on user telemetry to understand how people use their browser. They don't simply copy features. They try to understand their users. In the early days, browsers could ...


21

I don't have any evidence that this is the reason the spacebar is used for page down, but back in the day when IBM was setting PC design standards (that still heavily influence the design today), the original IBM AT 84-key keyboard from 1981 (IIRC) did not have page up/down or dedicated arrow keys (they shared the number pad): The standard 101-key keyboard ...


20

Arbitrary Limits are Bad Arbitrary limits are rarely a good thing. I am sure there is a limit somewhere (maybe 256 tabs?) but as long as it is far out of normal usage, most users never know and will treat it as "infinite", which actually makes for a better user experience. Having to manage "only up to 4" or "only up to 8" or ...


19

I have dealt with this question many times, and it's all a question of cost effectiveness. You should ask yourself: do the X% additional users that use IE 6-8 worth the Y% additional development cost? In order to answer that question, you will also have to determine how costly it is to support every browser version, considering the fact that some ...


19

I think you asked the wrong question. It's not just the number of users that matter: you should consider the types of users you exclude too. I literally used Ctrl+F to follow the link to this page. I'm a keyboard user with a slight difficulty in using the mouse. When I'm not already using the mouse for other reasons, when I want to follow a link in a ...


13

Don't inform them. Provided it works fine on all browers and doesn't look a huge mess in IE8 (see 'Graceful Degradation') then why bother telling users to update their browser? The chances are if they're using an old browser it's because they don't have a choice - it could be a corporate network where they don't have permission / ability to update, for ...


12

Many people have only a fuzzy awareness of the distinction between "The Web" and Google / Yahoo / whatever their homepage is set to. Therefore, such people often use the Google search box (or whatever) to enter URLs rather than the browser address bar. Google may have noticed this behaviour when developing the combined URL/search box in Chrome.


12

From a pure source code perspective, "why" may be hard to answer. In the latest WebKit, there is no commentary (neither the GTK implementation nor the EFL one): case VK_SPACE: granularity = WebCore::ScrollByPage; if (keyEvent.shiftKey()) direction = WebCore::ScrollUp; else direction = WebCore::ScrollDown; break; Rewind the ...


12

How did this come about? In 2005 this was implemented on Mozilla Firefox for the following reasons: The backspace key was mapped to the browser ‘Back’ function in Mozilla for consistency with Internet Explorer. However, to improve consistency with other applications running on Linux, it was decided that this mapping should be optional—and set based on ...


12

Well you can easily do it in Mozilla Firefox. Try pressing Ctrl+Shift+M Then you can choose from varieties of resolutions, also for your custom resolutions. You can drag the sides to increase and decrease the resolutions. Some links here on keyboard shortcuts and responsive design view Keyboard shortcuts on Mozilla Responsive Design View on Mozilla ...


12

I love this question, and I love that you asked it. Points given. I also think it's fundamentally misunderstanding how we approach to adaptive/responsive design - which is really not surprising since we're on a UX board and not a product design board. UX designers, almost by definition, aren't front end engineers. Because there's a bounty on this, I'm ...


12

I thought about sharing an interesting insight: IE8 is dying fast (looks like exponential decay). Not dead yet, but by the end of the year and by the current trend, IE8 market share globally should be under 1%. This is great news for most developer thinking about starting to build something now. However, as it has been explained, you should know your ...


11

Chrome used to have a "go button", which was removed in Google Chrome 6.0.437.1 (dev) - June 2010. You can read about some of the motivation on the issue tracker, although there isn't a lot of information available. It seemed to coincide with a revamp of their omnibox, and the combining of the reload and stop buttons into one button. To quote from the issue ...


11

Technically this is caused by the fact that images and other assets are generally hosted separately, and the browser only knows to go fetch them when the document uses them. It would be technically possible to delay displaying anything to the user until all the assets were ready (a lot of old-school Flash sites did this for instance, with a loading screen ...


10

I could think of two reasons a link to Mozilla, which wouldn't make much sense, if you ask me you're offline, you dinosaur!


10

All similar systems ultimately converge to the most optimum solution. It's happened with browsers, text editors, IDEs. You'll find that very few tend to deviate drastically from the norm. This extends to real world entities as well. TV's, Phones, etc. The more drastic your deviation from the similar-system norms, the more steep the learning curve for your ...


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