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Like nearly everyone here I try to make the websites I create a user friendly as possible. This includes any problems that might arise with accessibility.

I use ARIA in my HTML, I pick colors with the right amount of contrast, I use popular screen reader addons to see if my website functions correctly with those etc.

However, I have yet to find a way to be ahead of the problem. Is there any way, to know what or which disability a user might have when they visit the website.

My question is as followed: Is there any type of code/request that defines a certain accessibility problem when the user sends the first request to the server?

For instance, can a browser send additional information to the server that says 'this user is blind/has limited vision' and that the server responds with 'Ok, I will send you a different version of the webpage that is designed for people with limited vision'.

This different version can then be more designed on audio cues instead of visual cues when using interactive elements.

Update: I decided not to go through with enabling automatic detection, while it might help the world wide web should be an open place where you can interact without being marked by a disability brand.

The post that made me change my mind can be found here: https://www.powermapper.com/blog/accessibility-analytics/ if anyone would like to read it.

  • AFAIK there is no standard for this and there probably shouldn't be. However, you may be able to get a partial solution by looking at the browser's User Agent string to see if you can identify a screen reader. – Steve Jones May 29 '18 at 17:11
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    Thank you, I looked into it and found something that might make it possible. However I also found an article that made me decide not to do it. The world wide web is a place open for everyone, while detecting a screen reader might be a bit useful it might not be what people want. The world wide web is and should be a place where you can interact without being branded with a disability mark without your permission. The post that changed my mind can be found here: powermapper.com/blog/accessibility-analytics – Kevin M. May 29 '18 at 18:44
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Is there any way, to know what or which disability a user might have when they visit the website.

You ask them when they visit your site. Which is (1) annoying, (2) kinda insulting, and (3) potentially illegal.

This is why accessibility is hard. Understand the guidelines, and understand your audience. Do you best to handle what you can, and test against any specific target disabilities.

https://www.w3.org/WAI/standards-guidelines/wcag/

  • Thank you. It would indeed be insulting to ask people about it, and with the help of Steve Jones I found an article that made me decide to go through with it. – Kevin M. May 29 '18 at 18:48

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