Hot answers tagged

572

This phenomenon is called banner blindness. Your labeling looks like a banner advertisement and is therefore subconsciously skipped. Users have been conditioned to ignore complete sections of content if their previous experience taught them that it always contains irrelevant stuff. The more attention the banner tries to pull, the more it's ignored. If you ...


260

The banner is beautiful but the style does not match the rest of the page. You know what is everywhere on the Internet with unmatching graphic styles? Ads. As others have said, the problem is that users are not considering it as part of the content. It appears to be an ad, so they skip it. I think the crucial action to be taken is to integrate it deeply ...


116

It's the design. Visually it's not part of the site or page. It's a square of content that doesn't belong to the site visually which indicates it's an advertisement to users. Design the banner to be part of the site visually. The most simple way is to design it out of its surrounding design. This makes it part of the site visually. Below is an example. ...


113

It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


112

It strikes me that you probably should have researched your userbase before building the site. But hey, you're in this situation now so you need to deal with it as you find it. I am not surprised that hospitals / academic institutions are using IE7. Performing an entire refresh of the OS, browers, hardware etc. is a very costly exercise, so you'll likely ...


108

How about using something like this?


92

In carefully edited text, the choice to include the article depends on the meaning. Examples: I saw a newt yesterday, dark with blue spots. Can anybody help identify it? — Article not included: the reader guesses that the linked page is about newts in general. I saw a newt yesterday, dark with blue spots. Can anybody help identify it? —Article ...


80

Add a checkbox labelled 'Limit number of queries'. And only make the input field active if this checkbox is checked. Alternatively if you must use the infinity icon, keep it simple and place it to the right of the '+' button, in the same style. This would also adhere to the perception of hierarchy. i.e. the left button decreases the value, and the right ...


78

I'd go with a color that'll always retain stark contrast. I'd also avoid venturing too far outside of the styles that that users are generally familiar with. Because you're working in an atypical style, if you deviate and use unfamiliar elements you may risk confusing a percentage of your users. Here's what i think i'd recommend.


68

I would go with something in the shade of the background, but have a more red text in the alert. You can add a border in the shade of the text to make it stand out as an error more, as well.


60

Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


57

As previously said, the banner is inducing banner blindness not despite but because it is so enormous, prominent, clear and contrasting purple. Also, its placement just above the content makes it easy to ignore. The reader starts reading at the headline. Anything above it is easily ignored. Possible solutions: Put all the "Homebrew" content into an own ...


48

I came up with another way to handle this scenario which is more clear in cases with arbitrary jumps. 1. Show links below the text input to quickly convey how the bidding system works by listing valid choices which can be chosen with a single click right from the start. 2. Update valid choices as the user types or clicks The user can either type 68 or ...


43

Windows Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if you use it (or any other browser) to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Ref: Windows XP support has ended It is safe to address this to IT of the hospital that they need to upgrade to at least IE 9 due to safety reasons.


43

A bright yellow background with black text would work well. Fits the colour scheme of a warning sign.


37

Harry Brignull has an interesting post about adding artificial delays to increase perceived value which was inspired by a Hacker News post about locksmiths and their theatrics. In a nutshell: Purposefully adding a delay to a service may increase perceived value. In this case, the trivially longer time that it takes to "like" could possibly give the ...


30

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


29

I recently was playing around with a new type of pager control that only uses numbers and doesn't require any localization (next, previous, last, first, all function without any words required in the UI) I modified it slightly to work in your case here. The idea is to be really clear to the user up front that they can't just type anything they want because ...


29

If you look at a Wikipedia article with a banner that's functionally not unlike yours (this article needs improving), you'll see there are a number of design differences. Namely: The banner is part of the article, placed directly under the article's title The banner is not as wide as the article, it's centered but slightly smaller than the article text. ...


28

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


27

Don't blame the user for their situation. This is not about who's right, and what's correct. The last thing you want to do, from a UX perspective, is judge your users. A modal dialog telling them to upgrade is self-righteous. By expecting your users to know or care about such things as browsers or operating systems you're judging them, and that's how it will ...


25

3 small action buttons on the left-hand side of each row With a LTR languages, one can assume users will first inspect the row (starting from the left) and only then decide to take action. So placing the buttons on the left side is somewhat counter-flow. 3 small action buttons on the right-hand side of each row Pros: Buttons are easily accessible. ...


23

The standard color for error messages is red, see this question : One important point to understand is that using conventional colors for errors is important because they make the errors more noticeable. User being annoyed by the color of error message is lot less of a problem than user not being able to complete the form because they didn't ...


23

Icons alone can save space in case of long(er) labels, but the tradeoff is a memory tax on the user. Icons can give visual order and harmony to layout, especially in sidenavs. However, in a complex, multi-node nav, we are asking our users to memorize a lot of icons. See the firebase console as an example: In the expanded view, I get clear labels. Words ...


22

You know, I've read a lot of arguments on whether or not a site should allow for those who disable Javascript, and I've come to one conclusion: don't do it. Javascript has become a standard of the web I decided one day to disable Javascript and see if Facebook would function at all. It did not. This is because Facebook is run on Javascript (for the most ...


22

I could be wrong but I think here the smiley faces are the only rating system. The stars are a filter for 3 star hotels, 4 star hotels, etc.... Which....yes. Isn't immediately obvious at all and is quite confusing. It looks like they are using two separate rating systems. The user experience flaw here I would say is in using pictures and the simple word ...


21

You might try adding a white border, then play with the background color. The one color that communicates 'something is wrong' louder than red is the color of death, black.


20

HTTP error codes are primarily useful for support and debugging. In the early days of the internet, almost all users were technical, and so having them made a lot of sense. Today, it still makes sense having them visible, but that should not be the only information that you provide. Explain it like a human for the rest of the world to understand what ...


20

Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


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