40

Yes. Just yes. Though I do UX work, I am speaking as a user on this one. As a user, I very much want you to help me easily follow a row of data from end to end. I want to easily be able to see what lines up and what goes with what. It is too easy for me to look at a column on one side of a row, then to look at what I think is the opposite side of the same ...


36

By using text + image. You can use something like this: Bonus points for adding a subtle animation that catches even more attention.


32

The NNGroup sums it up pretty nicely here: Icon Usability A user’s understanding of an icon is based on previous experience. Due to the absence of a standard usage for most icons, text labels are necessary to communicate the meaning and reduce ambiguity. There are a few "standard icons" that are almost universally recognized, such as the ...


21

In many sports apps when you check the standings table you only get limited data (such as no. of games, points) and when you want to see all columns (no. of goals, wins, etc.) you need to rotate the screen to landscape mode. Multiple times I've seen a solution like in the UEFA European qualifiers app - a logo with an explanatory text above or below the table....


17

If you want to avoid the simple and obvious solutions: place signs above the cubicles reminding people to be quiet encourage cubicle dwellers to discourage loud behavior through constant reminders ("Shh!" or "Please keep it down") I suspect the only cultural design cues you could rely on are reverence (church, monastery) or respect (library, courtroom, ...


14

Print full-size images of people at work similar to what sometimes happens with empty shop hoardings. This would be effective because it's a visual reminder that people are behind the blank cubicle walls whilst preserving the privacy of those working and preventing them from being further distracted (if you had see-through cubicle walls). Some alterations ...


13

Came across this post today and wanted to provide a response based on some developments in the past couple of years (since 2012). Google offers a good solution signaling its Gmail users of sortable elements by using two rows of stacked dots on hover (desktop)


13

No, use the icon with a label. It's not safe to assume that people understand the meaning of the icon as it is used to adjust their preferences and to filter the results. So the meaning is already dubious. When you search for a preferences icon you get mainly cogs and sliders. But when you search for filter icons you get mainly funnels and sliders. See below....


12

It think it's just an additional feature that may not be used by majority of users, because as you start reading the content; your focus remains on the content, when you scroll slowly (as anyone would do while reading content) the indicator fails to drag attention. It only becomes noticeable when you scroll up/down at considerable speed. Its helpfulness to ...


11

Another "Macbook no scroll" UX problem... See, Apple's UX is arguably the best of the best. They set the rules for other people to follow and everything they do is copied, for a good reason. You could say they don't do many things wrong. Well, this approach is one of those few things that you can debate 'til the cows come home, but in the end empirical ...


11

I do see the funnel icon used widely for "filter" but in this case you've labeled it "preferences", so I think we have a bit of a disconnect there. I would expect most users to think of "preferences" in terms of what colour their background is, quite different than filtering content (as in selecting the results of a search). ...


9

TL;DR No, alternate row colors instead. Long answer: Alternating row colors (usually white and light green) to make it easier to read lines in wide reports have been used way before computer displays. If that table had alternating colors to beging with, there would be no need for highliting the row when hovering over it. Above: Green bar continuous ...


8

Material Design is a framework with guidelines (it's comprehensive but a starting point): Test with users to determine what's best for them. Have you also considered striped rows (zebra stripes) if you think users need to read carefully? It sounds like they won't perform any selection or operations. One aspect of zebra stripes is that they clearly show ...


7

Keep it simple. You could redesign your UI to present icons with checkboxes -- New (Not Started), Started (In Progress), Completed Tasks -- and the user could tick all or none or any combination, and you could display results accordingly. This will work in a way that the user is already used to on most other UIs and there's no learning or confusion. ...


5

I ran your image through this color blind checker Coblis — Color Blindness Simulator and this is what is your site or app is going to look like to a person who suffers from monochromacy Now taking this as an example,you have a number of problems here Your links have no visual affordance that they are links and they just seem like text without color. Links ...


5

To answer the question: the filter icon isn't used much. If you want to use it and you have space adding text "Filter Results" is always going to make it make more sense to people who speak English.


4

I think you can solve the visualization as a secondary matter to the added functionality of undo-ing field-specific changes. Place a small red x or a backwards-swirling arrow next to each field to indicate that there are changes which can be undone. If the user clicks on the x or the arrow the field contents will revert to their original state. These icons ...


4

I think this is a cultural/social issue but if you want to solve this problem through design I see two options: Give everyone an enclosed space (office) Take down all cubicle walls If being fully immersed in work without distraction is the most important goal then physically divided spaces are the way to go. If communicating quickly and freely with co-...


4

You could indicate lines separately. Also, you could try showing a visual marker for lines to indicate there are only 10 lines of space. Here is a quick sketch -


4

"Is this a useful or necessary aid that serves to improve the user experience" On web sites with multiple articles on a single page (e.g. blog formats or lazy-loading page), window scroll bar doesn't accurately tell you how much more reading you have left for current article. So a progress indicator DOES do a better job. So I wouldn't say it's purely ...


3

Don't do it Text readability has been extensively studied. Bolding a paragraph or changing colors will be very annoying to readers who are (and have every right to be) used to plain text layouts. If you have a problem with orientation, then there are many other ways to solve it. Chaptering, line breaks, horizontal rules, narrower column widths, obvious ...


3

I would personally use an edit icon like the following edit http://catalogus-professorum.org/extensions/themes/silverblue/images/icon-edit-grey.png This is your text By using an icon the users will know that there is an action associated with those contents, without having to interact with the mouse cursor. This solution works also on touch devices ...


3

Don't rely on the instructions, the better option is to develop self-documented form. These kind of forms are obvious for users and error-proofed. The means for developing such forms are: Right label names to support user's mental model Right controls. HTML5 supports a variety of shaped controls for emails, numbers, date, etc. Use placeholders for the ...


3

Here's an idea on how to make column A and B look sortable (buttons, pushable). Column C is in a disabled state, meaning interaction isn't possible. You really want to avoid forcing the user to have to roll over the headers to discover which ones that can be sorted and which ones that can't.


3

I see two problems in your current design. Unclear hierarchy, which leads to user lost in the interface. Users have reported of this problem, as you mentioned. Lack of system feedback. It's hard to know (or remember) which items are finished and which require executing wizard. So my proposition is to use Master-detail pattern to organize the items ...


3

Personally I find article progress bars redundant, but they may actually have some value. Generally, such bars are more visible: they are brighter, more contrast, and placed in a visible place. So, if I want to see my progress, I can do it immediately. I don't need to scroll the screen up-down to summon scrollbar, and then calculate height ratio subtracting ...


3

Highlighting doesn't necessarily imply interactivity, they also help the user maintain his horizontal line. Tables which are particularly dense or sparse on one or both axes can make it difficult to stay on one line. Material design guidelines already recommend enough whitespace to avoid being too dense, but don't necessarily prevent sparseness from ...


3

If I see a gauge needle at full throttle on a driving app my logical perception would be I was driving too fast. Stars would mean my driving was stellar. A traffic light, besides color considerations could mean to stop, to drive carefully or "hey, go on". In all cases, they fall into what Saussure called semiotic arbitrariness, so I think you should give ...


3

agree with the above answers, but note that the CONCEPT of "filter", even if that word is spelled out, won't be obvious to many users (confirm this via User Research). My 85 year old mother, for example, never uses a filter in the kitchen (food-cooking context) and would never guess that's where she'd tell the computer about her "dietary ...


3

Could you add a button/option that specifically highlights what has actually changed? Then, if someone is looking for those events that would help them and not distract those who aren't. It's a dilemma otherwise, subtle pretty much means not obviously noticeable - something like colour will be straight off noticeable (pre-attentive cue) whereas a small icon ...


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