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Remember always, as a principle, that we (as dev) should try to prevent user errors as much as possible. You are talking about a form that is filled in 3 steps. If you are worried about usability, you should consider the following: Users should know where they are at all times, meaning that it should be very clear to them that they are in step 1, 2, or 3. ...


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A good way would be to create checkers beside each information that the users would input. Let's say the user has to input four different information in screen A, then there would be four different checkmarks beside each info that lets the user know whether the input is valid or not. That way the user doesn't have to make the mistake first then have to go ...


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Basic principle of experiment design: you need something falsifiable. You can't test and falsify a "we don't know if..." statement. You can test and falsify a "we believe..." statement. That said, I think it's worth including unknowns as well. The key is to have some boundaries so you're not capturing the entire universe (we know almost nothing). I'd ...


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It depends on how your company handles old forms without validation. If a form previously edited is valid till a new change, then provide a page notification reminding the user of this change when a user tries to edit the form. When the user starts to edit, show that the field is not validated (with the style, red border, etc.). If the user doesn't give ...


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To add to the already good answer, would it be possible to prevent the user from making any wrong choices to begin with? Is it possible that when one field is filled in, the invalid options are no longer selectable in other fields? This may not be possible in fields like username and password. But in other fields perhaps it is. It would be almost like ...


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IMO, you are both correct. The engineer is doing their job by giving their insight. Meanwhile, the designer should advocate for user empathy. But here is some ammo for you, Dennis: is this validation list more of a SIGNAL or more of a NOISE? You can measure this question by testing and asking a small group of users. Let the results speak for themselves. If ...


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Even though most of the literature and articles on validation is in the context of form input, I think that you can pretty much handle most of them in the same way on widgets. For example, here is an article from the NNg group withe some guidelines on How to Report Errors in Forms that applies some of the concepts that you have described. The example where ...


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I agree with Cristian. It would be better to show the input range of the text field at the beginning. Another way could be to specify the input range in the "Placeholder Text". Still, if the user enters invalid numbers, I would recommend highlighting the box with a red color. It's one of the Usability Heuristics to inform the user about the error clearly and ...


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I recommend either to show the allowed range for the input from the beginning or do real time validation. It is bad UX to verify inputs only after ok is being pressed. For the second part you can let the use input a value that is not widthin range like 1760 or even 17000 but mark the input red and disable the ok button. This is where the shown allowed ...


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I would recommend to produce an error message most of the time the same way: What is wrong How to solve the problem properly If the validation like it is in your example would be for 2 error messages you should still stick to this issue and try to summarize them. Because telling the User that the age is a mandatory field could end up in a second error ...


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