7

If the purpose of the meter is to help communicate the strength of the password, then the criteria should absolutely be shown. A meter by itself isn't enough to communicate "this is both long and complex enough, based on the criteria we've established for our site." Password strength meters (and strength criteria, for that matter) are ...


3

Options: Validate When Form is Submitted Validate When Input Loses Focus Validate X Time after User Stops Typing Validate After Every Keystroke Traditionally, sites would use option 1. Option 2 became much more common with the widespread adoption of HTML5. Over the last decade, sites have begun moving to option 4. What I rarely see is option 3, which is a ...


3

There are two different situations you need to handle: Successful save, and validation/error. These are quite different so you should treat each solution independently. On successful save Typically, this is going to be your most common scenario, especially once the users are familiar with the data they are entering. This is your 99% scenario, so you want ...


3

It appears that the username and password fields are related to creating a new user account, perhaps something that a system admin would do when setting up a new user (as opposed to a user doing it for their own account). With this is mind, I would suggest making that part of the form a more explicit action. Only show those fields when they are required to ...


2

Common practice is to use conditional logic. You can prevent the user being nagged about something they intended by adding a checkbox before the department filter field. The checkbox can say something like "Add a department filter?" and only show the filter if it's selected. When you do this, you can make the department filter field mandatory, if ...


2

If I think about forms, I would say most forms do have a submit or save button. Hence most users probably expect that in your form to. To give the user the security that the inputs are saved I would go with a visual feedback, that the data is saved. This could be something like a small text like "all changes saved" or similar. If there is an error ...


1

A solution would be to automatically start editing mode, when the user adds a new row. So confirming a row would always return into the table in editing mode - and everything always has to be saved by pressing "SAVE" in the editing mode. Although this will be an extra click for the user it has several benefits. If for example a table has a ...


1

I think the second option is the valid one, since the Save button of the second window is linked to the Save or Cancel buttons of the first one. Maybe a possible solution is to differentiate the name of each Cancel button. There are several examples, but you have one in front of you that may be able to help you. To post a question or an answer in UXSE ...


1

To your first question: On a mobile screen, it's always a good idea to show/ask one thing at a time. Also, based how you want to handle score confirmation, it might be better suited to a pop-up card of its own. To your second question: Let's first look at the problem. Your use case calls for 3 distinct scenarios: Play hasn't started yet, one player streams ...


1

I would recommend looking at how someone like gov.uk handle errors on their forms. Adam Silver has written a great book on form design. Here is an example of a great form error pattern that is tried and tested by the team at gov.uk http://nostyle.herokuapp.com/examples/registration-form I highly recommend this book: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/10/...


1

There is no need for that space. With a good animation you can signify that a message appears. This is because messages can have more rows and showing the space will make your design messy.


1

I’m not so sure the problem is the slider controls so much as the labeling and self-documentation of your application classes, plus perhaps the fact that you are using percents. Class Labels You have Essential and Non-Essential application classes. Doesn’t that cover pretty much everything? I mean, if something is not an Essential, then isn’t that by ...


1

Maybe this is a variation of another answers, just a kind of clarification of option 3. You may introduce the concept of status (role, etc.) of user and clearly mention it in user interface. Say after registration with email verification user become Reader. And you promote in your interface that to write post user need to become Writer. So user constantly ...


1

Just offer the option. Let the user know that these steps will be required at some point, but let them choose whether to do them at the time of registration or at a later time. You'll find that those who are already "sold" on the service will likely complete the entire registration process at once. On the other hand, those who just want to cheque ...


1

The answer from @AndyMercer is a good one, but I'd suggest there is a slightly better approach that combines Option 2 and Option 4. How I would approach this is using the following steps: The first time the field is focussed, defer validation until the field loses focus/is blurred. This avoids the angry error message before you've had a chance to at least ...


1

No right answer here, depends on strength of cue and use case. Blur events and submit events may go very wrong if the page reloads in form submit, like it does on some tech stacks, causing user to never see the cue. Can you do it on every keystroke?


1

Username and password together are an entity that is optional. When the entity is wanted then the fields within it are required. What can we call this entity, "credentials"? Similar to musefans answer but with the emphasis on using a fieldset with legend and with the difference that you use buttons to explicitly add or remove the credentials. Name ...


1

the current design looks great, Also in my opinion when dealing with promo codes its important to provide the user a sense of satisfaction. hence feedback should tell you that The action has been successful and how much money was saved and both needs to be shown in a more presentable manner. not sure if your system allows removal , if yes you can find the ...


1

I know the question is old, but if you're worried about users entering the wrong domain, you can use something like mailcheck.


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