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214 votes
Accepted

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Beside what was said in the other good answers here, you have a much more basic problem. You are misreading your data. A heatmap generally sums up all clicks on a pixel, regardless of who made them. ...
Rumi P.'s user avatar
  • 6,234
86 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Performance is important, but even more that your goals are achieved. Consider what kind of users are utilising the sorting feature. Because, for example, it might happen that those users, although ...
Alvaro's user avatar
  • 16.8k
40 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Do your users know that the columns are sortable? I ask this, because even though there appears to be a sort indicator on the first column, the users may not realize that they can click the headings. ...
kettch's user avatar
  • 801
25 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

This may be a bit off topic as it more sits under the development side of things. As a full stack developer I can say that search functionality can be performance intensive. This all depends on what ...
Micah Montoya's user avatar
11 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

You should always be extremely cautious about removing a feature. Most companies don't have a very good idea of why their customers choose their products over their competitors'. There's always the ...
industry7's user avatar
  • 210
10 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Some good thoughts have already been shared, so I'll just add one thing I didn't see. While the quantitative data around the features use is important, it doesn't reveal why users are or aren't ...
Josh Olsen's user avatar
9 votes

How do you stand up for the admin user experience in enterprise software applications?

It's about ROI Whether it is the project manager or yourself that sets UX priorities, some cost/benefit analysis has to be made. Nearly all systems will involve many more end-users than admins, so ...
Izhaki's user avatar
  • 32.6k
4 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

It seems that if you remove the sorting feature users will have difficulties finding under performing campaigns. This sounds like an important action, if not the primary one, therefore, you should ...
Kristiyan Lukanov's user avatar
4 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

To me, the key question when deciding to kill off or redesign an existing feature is simple: what will be the net gain in usability? The general rule of thumb is if you don't see a gain of at least 20%...
Andy Rice's user avatar
  • 161
4 votes
Accepted

Password Recovery/Recovery Question Process Flow

I have wrote a couple articles on this subject (in Spanish). The obvious answer would be: use multi-factor authentication. I really despise that approach. In those articles I have demonstrated with ...
Devin's user avatar
  • 38.1k
4 votes

Password Recovery/Recovery Question Process Flow

The problem with Security Questions While it may seem that security questions are something that you'd want to implement in your application to provide an additional layer of security, you aren't ...
Craine's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes

Should large corporations have dedicated UX teams?

I would rephrase your question slightly: Should UX be embedded in an application team, or should it be a centralized resource? Embedding UX in the application team allows the UX professional to ...
nadyne's user avatar
  • 3,644
3 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Before even considering removing a feature (which took resources to make) think about the following: Who uses it? Depending on the application sorting might be a feature which only power users use ...
rbaleksandar's user avatar
3 votes

In an e-commerce site why the checkout card is often placed in right hand side...why not in left?

Almost everywhere in the world you turn pages from right to left, so in most cultures moving to the right side is associated with moving to the next page/stage. And moving to the left is associated ...
UXP's user avatar
  • 159
3 votes
Accepted

How to merge designs?

I have some experience both proposing several design options, and also moving from one visual language to another. Personally I'd recommend to: Create some kind of interface inventory, to better ...
Andreas Johansson's user avatar
3 votes

Timeline for Implementing UX Process

You will need to start with the MVP features prioritised. Then develop a Gantt chart based on the complexity of the feature. If there is not enough time, you will need to compromise somewhere. ...
Ren's user avatar
  • 3,196
3 votes
Accepted

Should UX researchers provide design recommendations?

No, it's not out of line for researchers to suggest UX solutions. This is a fairly common practice in many organizations, and is often appreciated where non-designers are doing the design work. Having ...
Izquierdo's user avatar
  • 12.7k
2 votes

Should we kill the features that users are not using frequently, to improve performance?

Keep the interface as it is, but ask the developers to move the sorting processing to the client-side. This will take the strain off the database, and the app will run fast for people who don't sort.
Robyn's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
Accepted

How do you stand up for the admin user experience in enterprise software applications?

Your process for "admin" interfaces is ultimately no different than any other argument for usability. The argument for improved usability boils down to return on investment (ROI) in all cases. How you ...
Nicholas Pappas's user avatar
2 votes

What's the best place to display important information on mobile screen

Make field study You should really test that when users are running and using your app. Try to experiment putting the statistics on all corners of your app and see what feedback you will get. This is ...
Kristiyan Lukanov's user avatar
2 votes

Advocating UX practice

I've run into this issue twice now, both within start ups, the first where product development was directed by marketing alone, the second where new products and features were dictated by sales alone ...
Jamezrp's user avatar
  • 2,788
2 votes
Accepted

'Remove' all item from a cart

I would not add this button in the first place. Reason: It adds visual noise and usually little value. Having insights from multiple eCommerce sites I can say that deleting many items is rare. If ...
greenforest's user avatar
  • 8,776
2 votes

In an e-commerce site why the checkout card is often placed in right hand side...why not in left?

It depends on the language you’re familiar with. People who write from left to right feel progress as something from left to right; the right represents what’s "after". People who write from right to ...
bfontaine's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

Solution to layout of a large productivity app

Why don't you segment your forms into practical groupings / categorizations and then linearly display these groups: Sender, Attachments, Message - providing less requirements for increased screen ...
Zze's user avatar
  • 123
2 votes

What is the best form element for multiple number inputs? (Days, Hours, Minutes)

I'd like to suggest this kind of selection. in the desktop mode it's easy to click and type as well as tablet mode it's easy to tap and select numbers. and I've put 5x to the minutes for more user-...
Yasintha's user avatar
  • 176
2 votes

What are the correct steps to build a SaaS B2B company UX experience?

Well one is UX or CX in your case, and one is company strategy. You should ask for inputs from your Chefs, regarding; who exactly are you competitors, who are clients, what are your goals, what are ...
xul's user avatar
  • 2,676
2 votes

Low-fi wireframes doesn't help me to structure my idea about web design. Can anyone tell me how to solve this?

welcome. There are many ways to do wireframing. The traditional lo-fi way is helpful for getting out ideas quickly, especially across multiple pages. If you're working heavily on one page, or need ...
Izquierdo's user avatar
  • 12.7k
2 votes

UX & Agile: What criteria could change the complexity of a UX user story?

There are two concepts to apply here. The first is that relative estimation (most commonly done with story points) is not meant to be precise and therefor people get tripped up when they try to ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 576
2 votes

What are some examples of UX engineering heuristics?

Within the context that you are referring to when it comes to UX engineering, there are some interesting points to raise when it comes to component prototyping and development, UI architecture, and ...
Michael Lai's user avatar
  • 27.3k

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