210

Beside what was said in the other good answers here, you have a much more basic problem. You are misreading your data. A heatmap generally sums up all clicks on a pixel, regardless of who made them. And you (and the other answers) seem to be interpreting this heatmap as the proportion of users who ever click on that pixel, which is an entirely different ...


86

Performance is important, but even more that your goals are achieved. Consider what kind of users are utilising the sorting feature. Because, for example, it might happen that those users, although few, are the ones that you are interested in supporting. I would suggest A/B testing to see how does removing the sorting affect your goals. You might find out ...


62

Most developers I've worked with have opinions about the UX, and often they can be valid. A lot of the time they cause more headaches than desired but that's primarily down to a lack of communication across the team. Communication is the antidote in this instance. I'll talk about some best practices and ideal scenarios that should help to illustrate some ...


40

Do your users know that the columns are sortable? I ask this, because even though there appears to be a sort indicator on the first column, the users may not realize that they can click the headings. What is the average size of the data set? If, after a search, I get all of the information I need in a single screen of data, I might not be inclined to sort....


29

This is about organisational structure and the classic silo mentality. Lose the silos. Silos emphasise personal goals rather than goals of the organisation. Strategies become fragmented and internalised rather than being part of a bigger picture for the benefit of the end users. Passing off chunks of work from one group to another is not the right way to ...


29

Use dialog, not direction, Use conversations, not coercion Code monkeys are a symptom of a lousy design and development process which emphasizes direction/management versus dialog/collaboration. There are many names for this kind of process (waterfall, linear, directive, etc) but at the heart of it, the code monkey syndrome comes out of a design/development ...


25

This may be a bit off topic as it more sits under the development side of things. As a full stack developer I can say that search functionality can be performance intensive. This all depends on what is searched, how much is searched, how much filtering is initially done, etc. I'd have the developers reevaluate the initial search functionality and see where ...


14

This is an excellent question. I've seen decision processes fail at big companies (e.g. teams immobilized by consensus at Google) and small companies (e.g. ego-driven founder decisions at startups). Unfortunately most corporate training programs provide are designed to help UX and dev teams with vertical skills and resources, but very few corporate programs ...


11

This is a very broad question, for which this long answer is just the iceberg tip. Divide and conquer one thing which always failed is that we didn't define who has the final say, who can actually decide what to do and how. The agile answer to this is that everyone decides together. But this often fails miserably for the following reasons: There is too ...


11

You should always be extremely cautious about removing a feature. Most companies don't have a very good idea of why their customers choose their products over their competitors'. There's always the possibility that you will accidentally remove a killer feature and put yourself out of business. You need to have a very good business reason to remove a ...


10

Some good thoughts have already been shared, so I'll just add one thing I didn't see. While the quantitative data around the features use is important, it doesn't reveal why users are or aren't sorting. It sounds like you as the designer assume some perceived value in the sorting function, so figuring out if those assumptions line up with your users thinking ...


9

There are great answers here already. I'd like to provide a slightly different perspective on the topic, which is more process-based. Test driven development From the different strategies for software development, Test Driven Development (TDD) is one of the most popular ones nowadays. It asserts that you should write tests before writing any code. But ...


9

Whether it is a 'coding monkey' or a 'pixel monkey' (for graphic/visual designers) dilemma, the problem remains the same. There are essentially two aspects of any role that has some degree of specialization. In the first instance it is about being able to solve problems in your domain area, and the second instance it is about implementing the solution. The ...


9

It's about ROI Whether it is the project manager or yourself that sets UX priorities, some cost/benefit analysis has to be made. Nearly all systems will involve many more end-users than admins, so it makes sense to cater for end-users more than to admins. There's nothing wrong with that - it's a wise economical choice. Remember that UX and development ...


7

Engage developers in UX Developers are smart and generally want to understand why and "because it's in the spec" just creates another reasonable question why is it in the spec? Explaining, defending and gaining respect all help but here are specific activities I have found to create leverage: Let developer see and feel users issues In user tests, ...


5

Okay just a bullet point list, without further explanation. Usability and UX is teamwork, so it needs the whole chain in product development to be engaged: Strategic No time, no budget, no priority Different roles in design and development have different objectives and goals Timing is too tight - Upper management prioritizes 'time to market' Software ...


4

Some of the most depressing times I've had in my life, were when I had to implement something that somebody else designed, and they designed it poorly. Putting a lot of energy and time into something that you know is going to be completely useless (or worse) is about as soulcrushing as our job can get. The closer I got to the start of te project, where all ...


4

Yes you can use color to show which is which, but I wouldn't make the whole lesson block one color. I wouldn't make the whole block as a button either. Just make a button that says available/full/registered and give that a color. You could use the traffic lights for this (red = full, green = registered, yellow = open spots) or RGB (red = full, green = open,...


4

It seems that if you remove the sorting feature users will have difficulties finding under performing campaigns. This sounds like an important action, if not the primary one, therefore, you should support sorting. In my opinion, the performance gain would not be as great as the difficulties it will create for users. It will be better for them to load 0.1 ...


4

To me, the key question when deciding to kill off or redesign an existing feature is simple: what will be the net gain in usability? The general rule of thumb is if you don't see a gain of at least 20% (by whatever metric(s) is important for your domain), you probably shouldn't do it. The 20% number isn't important, what is important is that you think about ...


4

I have wrote a couple articles on this subject (in Spanish). The obvious answer would be: use multi-factor authentication. I really despise that approach. In those articles I have demonstrated with real user cases that they're not necessarily more secure, but they always lead to HORRIBLE user experiences. Without getting into great detail, let me put it as ...


4

The problem with Security Questions While it may seem that security questions are something that you'd want to implement in your application to provide an additional layer of security, you aren't really adding anything of value to the security of your user's accounts. A study by Google showed that across their very large user base, security questions were ...


3

It always boils down to one thing: Ignorance I don't mean that as a slam against orgs lacking UX maturity. It's just the reality of where many markets are right now. The business has to understand the importance of design* in key decision-making functions: Strategy Innovation Optimization Operations Market differentiation Those areas have primarily ...


3

The Value of embedding UX Practices UX Integration is key to delivering UX of the product! Embeding UX practices enables a more focused and thorough design process while also offering a strategic view of how a product will evolve. This being said, having this integrated view requires a higher level of UX maturity within an organisation and therefore ...


3

What most UX teams are missing is a "UX Sales" person. Most UX people are good at UX. Not as many of us are good at selling UX. I'd call that the 'integration' role. You need an advocate in the organization that acts as the face of the UX team. This is typically a UX Director position of some sort.


3

I think the key here is to distinguish between telling the developer what needs to be done and telling the developer how to do it. The UX designer specializes in figuring out what user experience is going to be more positive. This involves ease of learning and ease of use, among other things. If the developer respects the UX designer, the developer will ...


3

I don't think there is an industry standard nor do I believe there should be one. I personally look at User Experience design as a set of tools that I can use dependant on the project I am working on. Some clients won't have enough time or budget for me to do extensive research, therefor I need to adapt my toolkit to what their needs are and what we are ...


3

My question is what approaches (process, tools and methods, etc.) do you use in your work as a UX expert, interaction designer, or similar to overcome the 'coding monkey dilemma'? I update my resume and find a new job. Unfortunately, for both coders and UX people, what makes your role a 'coding monkey' role is organizational culture. The biggest red flags ...


3

Client apathy If your clients aren't interested in the user experience, you'll gain no traction. This is often the case in a large enterprise, where it's not uncommon to hear something along the lines of "We have a deadline to meet so just put the billing screens out there, the data entry clerks will figure them out." Client resistance to change If your ...


3

An alternative term could be User Centered Design. To paraphrase this article from A List Apart: alistapart.com/column/looking-beyond-user-centered-design UX refers to the "what" and User Centered Design refers to the "how". It seems appropriate if he's trying to describe the processes behind UX.


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