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161

Use icons, they communicate a lot more than colours alone. If you must use colours, simply colour the icons.


103

There is no problem to work as a UX/UI designer, as choosing color is just a minor part of the usability process. There are lots of other activities that the UX-er should do, like usability testing, checking analytics, conducting A/B tests, writing reports. Choosing color is more like visual designers work. People often are confused between the two ...


58

I've been doing front-end work for a decade, and I have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly (red-green color blindness). It has never been a problem. I largely rely on color codes and location/proximity on color picker UIs to identify colors. When doing a design from scratch, I will often look at pre-existing palettes for inspiration. I will also use an ...


38

The choice "Other" is a very neutral and well-established term which most people quickly understand. If I saw "Let me tell you why:" as an option then I would have to think twice about what it implies. I recommend reading Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think If an analogy helps then your suggestion is akin to renaming the common hammer into "Nail Impaler"....


34

Because the first widely used ink was iron gall which had purple-black or blue-black colour. And the color remained as a standard until today. text written with iron gall ink Detailed explanation: The pervasiveness of blue ink has to do with the type of ink that preceded the modern dye based inks. From about the 5th century to the late 19th or ...


33

I mocked up a version of the form in HTML that I think improves a couple of things (but not all, because I'm not you and don't know your specific domain issues): http://newlyminted.handcraft.com/ Some of the changes I made: Group related fields. First name, middle name and last name are part of the same flow, so group them together visually. Same goes for ...


31

There is enough ambiguity here that labeling and context are necessary It doesn't matter whether 30%, 50% or 70% of users think this is male (vs female or gender-neutral). There is enough ambiguity here that the infographic will fail to communicate gender effectively so context and labeling are necessary to make it effective. This Nielsen article ...


29

You're here! This is the right place! You can answer real people's real questions about real situations and needing real answers, - maybe with just real ideas, or with real mock-ups and real designs! All manner of problems and challenges are raised here - take a look at previous questions (especially the unaccepted/unanswered ones) or watch the new ones ...


29

UCD ∈ UX Put another way, user-centred design is a method (or process) to achieving good user experience. Here is an example UCD design flow using SAP (note arrows indicating a process): Source: SAP Design Guild


25

Limitations are limiting Everyone here is very nice, but they're dodging one important point: Being a color-blind UXD will limit your ability to be an all-in-one product designer. Everyone has their limits. Unlike you, I do not have a solid engineering background. I work closely with a software architect throughout the discovery phase of a product or ...


23

This is a great question. I believe there aren't any conventions besides W3C's good contrast color. According to the links below, the best way is adding some kind of visual cue, a shape or something that doesn't depend on the color alone. For example, if you want to make a "danger" status you could add a caution icon, think about the pedestrian signal ...


20

I find it glaring that the sound of the letter 'X' (ex) is the same as the opening sound in experience, whereas the letter 'E' sounds like the start of international. So I think that sound-wise, UX is closer to User Experience than UE. Just to support this: Extra large is marked 'XL' and not 'EL'. Also, the sound of UE (U-yi) reminds of GUI (Gu-yi) and ...


19

This question bothers me. Like, a lot. Really! Taking a step back, the question is all wrong. It is not a matter of how many people you need in a UX team, but how many of your team are on board with working towards the user experience. If the answer is not Everyone!, then probably you need an evangelist to make everyone else realise that they are all a part ...


18

User experience is about making the things you do easy rather than frustrating. It is about taking complex tasks, like ordering something from Amazon, and finding ways to take people through the process so they understand what is happening, what they need to do, and accomplish their task. Computers are immensely complex; UX is about making that complexity ...


17

I have not done coding Well, then I'd say you don't have HTML and CSS skills. That's not a deal breaker. But I'd much rather have you be honest about it then try to fake your way through some CSS questions during the interview. State "I understand the basics and am eager to learn more, but haven't actually done front end development work". Can you share ...


17

After some years of fighting I got used to it. There are various ways to struggle with it, you can play as an authority often saying "no", or actually "NO!", but you will lose your followers, because there are always decisive people who will maintain that they know better. You can try to establish processes, but there are going to be people who will not ...


17

Nowadays the "popularity" of blue (not in every country) probably has more to do with established conventions and as an easy way to differentiate between printed text (black) and handwritten text (blue). Why use dark ink? As paper color is usually white, a dark color creates contrast. (Contrast was specially useful for faxes) Why use a different color ...


15

Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience [something]",...


15

"Wireframe deck" is not an industry wide term that refers to a specific presentation format. Your best bet would be to seek a definition from the employer, possibly giving them a few examples so as to illustrate that you've thought the problem through and are looking for clarification. Over on EnglishLanguage.SE a similar question was asked: What is a Deck, ...


14

User Experience is a cross over field in that to do it well you can't be purely technical nor purely focused on artistic and human factors. You have to have skills from all sides and understand the interplay between them. When talking about websites and applications, to be good at UX you need to understand development and its related technologies. But you ...


14

Your story sounds similar to my case (I am not the first UX hire but I am the first guy whom they have hired who has had formal education in UX as such). Anyway here is what I would focus on: Find out who are the key stakeholders in the company who are interested in user experience: This is really important as you would need the support of at least someone ...


14

I wouldn't use only a placeholder because of the browser support. Not all old browsers support the placeholder! Take a look to this Stackoverflow Question and to this article about placeholder support. And I wouldn't use the term "Email ID". Many users are confused about the "ID". I also heard many stories about the confusion of the "Yahoo ID". "Should I ...


14

Color blindness may hinder your ability to produce some visual designs and maybe some parts of a 'pretty' UI, as color goes a long way to aesthetic appeal, BUT, as a UX designer I would go so far as to say that you can use color blindness to your advantage. Around 8% of men and .5% of women are color blind, and as a UX designer, it is our job to make sure ...


14

I wouldn't do this for one simple reason: it might become an outlet for your customer's emotions. An 'other' box stays within the rational spheres; as a user you're being asked for a reason, you're not being asked about how you feel about the reason for canceling. When you ask people why they cancel a subscription it often has a negative reason: "too ...


13

The basics of UX work can be done by almost anyone willing to spend some time and effort learning how. Steve Krug's "Rocket Surgery Made Easy" shows that well. However that doesn't mean that everyone is a UX expert. Think of UX like painting a picture. Anyone can paint, and almost everyone can paint something decent with a little time and effort put ...


13

Ask them: "What software do you love using? Which software do you hate using?" Then point out the one you love likely had user experience people on the team.


12

Good question but a ticky one to answer :). Here would be my inputs considering I just broke into the HCI field a couple of years back or so: Understand that HCI is not about just graphic design or Information architecture or interaction design or user research. You could work as a developer and still have an active interest in human computer interactions ...


11

It doesn't make any sense to measure a UX designer's progress at making wireframes. Wireframes are just a way to communicate with other people and can take many forms, from sketches to mockups to "interactive" wireframes produced with software like Axure. Their purpose is to represent ideas in a form that can be discussed with stakeholders, team members and ...


11

Are Dark Patterns Unethical? Users will not knowingly choose something against their own interests –they will not voluntarily select a poorer user experience than they otherwise could get. Dark design patterns by definition encourage users to act against their own interest and thus necessarily involve trickery, exploitation, deception, and dishonesty. These ...


11

UXD describes what's designed (the experience). UCD describes the process (starting with user research and validated through artefacts like personas). In practice, most UX designers try to work in a user-centered way, but that's not always easy to achieve under commercial constraints, especially when the user and the customer are not actually the same person ...


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