161

Use icons, they communicate a lot more than colours alone. If you must use colours, simply colour the icons.


103

There is no problem to work as a UX/UI designer, as choosing color is just a minor part of the usability process. There are lots of other activities that the UX-er should do, like usability testing, checking analytics, conducting A/B tests, writing reports. Choosing color is more like visual designers work. People often are confused between the two ...


57

I've been doing front-end work for a decade, and I have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly (red-green color blindness). It has never been a problem. I largely rely on color codes and location/proximity on color picker UIs to identify colors. When doing a design from scratch, I will often look at pre-existing palettes for inspiration. I will also use an ...


38

The choice "Other" is a very neutral and well-established term which most people quickly understand. If I saw "Let me tell you why:" as an option then I would have to think twice about what it implies. I recommend reading Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think If an analogy helps then your suggestion is akin to renaming the common hammer into "Nail Impaler"....


34

Because the first widely used ink was iron gall which had purple-black or blue-black colour. And the color remained as a standard until today. text written with iron gall ink Detailed explanation: The pervasiveness of blue ink has to do with the type of ink that preceded the modern dye based inks. From about the 5th century to the late 19th or ...


31

There is enough ambiguity here that labeling and context are necessary It doesn't matter whether 30%, 50% or 70% of users think this is male (vs female or gender-neutral). There is enough ambiguity here that the infographic will fail to communicate gender effectively so context and labeling are necessary to make it effective. This Nielsen article describes ...


29

UCD ∈ UX Put another way, user-centred design is a method (or process) to achieving good user experience. Here is an example UCD design flow using SAP (note arrows indicating a process): Source: SAP Design Guild


25

Limitations are limiting Everyone here is very nice, but they're dodging one important point: Being a color-blind UXD will limit your ability to be an all-in-one product designer. Everyone has their limits. Unlike you, I do not have a solid engineering background. I work closely with a software architect throughout the discovery phase of a product or ...


23

This is a great question. I believe there aren't any conventions besides W3C's good contrast color. According to the links below, the best way is adding some kind of visual cue, a shape or something that doesn't depend on the color alone. For example, if you want to make a "danger" status you could add a caution icon, think about the pedestrian signal ...


21

I find it glaring that the sound of the letter 'X' (ex) is the same as the opening sound in experience, whereas the letter 'E' sounds like the start of international. So I think that sound-wise, UX is closer to User Experience than UE. Just to support this: Extra large is marked 'XL' and not 'EL'. Also, the sound of UE (U-yi) reminds of GUI (Gu-yi) and ...


17

After some years of fighting I got used to it. There are various ways to struggle with it, you can play as an authority often saying "no", or actually "NO!", but you will lose your followers, because there are always decisive people who will maintain that they know better. You can try to establish processes, but there are going to be people who will not ...


17

Nowadays the "popularity" of blue (not in every country) probably has more to do with established conventions and as an easy way to differentiate between printed text (black) and handwritten text (blue). Why use dark ink? As paper color is usually white, a dark color creates contrast. (Contrast was specially useful for faxes) Why use a different color ...


15

Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience [something]",...


15

"Wireframe deck" is not an industry wide term that refers to a specific presentation format. Your best bet would be to seek a definition from the employer, possibly giving them a few examples so as to illustrate that you've thought the problem through and are looking for clarification. Over on EnglishLanguage.SE a similar question was asked: What is a Deck, ...


14

Your story sounds similar to my case (I am not the first UX hire but I am the first guy whom they have hired who has had formal education in UX as such). Anyway here is what I would focus on: Find out who are the key stakeholders in the company who are interested in user experience: This is really important as you would need the support of at least someone ...


14

Color blindness may hinder your ability to produce some visual designs and maybe some parts of a 'pretty' UI, as color goes a long way to aesthetic appeal, BUT, as a UX designer I would go so far as to say that you can use color blindness to your advantage. Around 8% of men and .5% of women are color blind, and as a UX designer, it is our job to make sure ...


14

I wouldn't do this for one simple reason: it might become an outlet for your customer's emotions. An 'other' box stays within the rational spheres; as a user you're being asked for a reason, you're not being asked about how you feel about the reason for canceling. When you ask people why they cancel a subscription it often has a negative reason: "too ...


12

Good question but a ticky one to answer :). Here would be my inputs considering I just broke into the HCI field a couple of years back or so: Understand that HCI is not about just graphic design or Information architecture or interaction design or user research. You could work as a developer and still have an active interest in human computer interactions ...


11

UXD describes what's designed (the experience). UCD describes the process (starting with user research and validated through artefacts like personas). In practice, most UX designers try to work in a user-centered way, but that's not always easy to achieve under commercial constraints, especially when the user and the customer are not actually the same person ...


11

I worked with a front-end developer with color blindness in the past. It never was a problem. You may have to check if the used colors are good for the larger group of users, but every UI/UX professional should check how a design looks and works for all kinds of users. No difference in my opinion.


10

You have had some great inputs but in my experience , they key thing which most UX recruiters and UX hiring managers look for is the process with which you have achieved with your end goal. While you can go with a number of different approaches with regards to how to showcase your content (slideshows, carousals, lightboxes) the end result is often not the ...


10

It's a good but difficult question, without any universally good solution. However I will try to give you some things that you can do to help with this. Firstly, recognise that the role of a UX designer is to say no a lot of the time. That doesn't mean that you say "no" whenever someone suggests something that you don't particularly like. Secondly, you ...


10

They say that "too many cooks spoil the soup" and while there's some truth to that, I think the proper saying is actually "too many opinionated people that think they are cooks spoil the soup" is more appropriate. So, yes, having too many uninformed opinions can be a bad thing (design by committee) but having multiple informed opinions isn't necessarily bad, ...


10

I'd say no. Some languages have names like "Dirk van Boxtel" or "Sophie van der Pol". Notice how the words in between are not capitalized.


10

Do not change what the user enters. Do not assume parts, split into parts, or assemble from parts Present the user with an example how their name will be used Example letter we might send to you: Dear john dOE, It is a great pleasure to hear from you again after all this time ... or We will address packages to you like this: Mrs. Sophie ...


10

Trends... There has been a general positive trend over the last 15 years for designers to take on larger and larger scope of responsibilities within the product development process 15 years ago in the "Microsoft" era of formal software development, human-computer interaction, visual design, or information architecture were specific disciplines in ...


10

Labels on either side serve different purposes. In reading order, Labels before the switch (on the left or top for LTR languages) indicate what the switch is for. Labels after the switch (on the right or bottom for LTR) optionally indicate the state of the switch. Here's an example from Windows 10: When you can't afford space, you can wrap the items ...


10

Basic shapes are going to be a difficult task, there really isn't a convention on these. As an example: Tristan's hexagon for stop is a circle for me. The obvious answer is "use labels". But if you can't, you can do any of these: use the contour bias logic to transmit the message. The sharpest, the more dangerous. So, circle: success ; square: warning; ...


9

I completed the CUA course back in 2008-9 (I think) followed by the exam a few months later. Although I have a Degree in a related field (Graphic and Interactive Design), I wanted to suppliment this with a UX specific certification. The course was certainly useful. For the most part it reassured me that my level of existing knowledge was sound, and helped ...


9

As I mention in my answer to the question on What research methods can I use to create personas?, some key elements to keeping the persona valid and relevant include: state your research goals before you start so that the persona can be kept relevant to your goals define how you will use personas so that you can ensure your personas include the relevant ...


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