62

Most developers I've worked with have opinions about the UX, and often they can be valid. A lot of the time they cause more headaches than desired but that's primarily down to a lack of communication across the team. Communication is the antidote in this instance. I'll talk about some best practices and ideal scenarios that should help to illustrate some ...


32

No. Those are two fundamentally different jobs. Except in the scenario that the UX design is for a product the primary purpose of which is OOP development (e.g. an IDE). Otherwise, of course, there is no harm to knowing the "principles" of OOP. Further, knowing about a broad range of different things (including OOP) can certainly help you to think ...


29

This is about organisational structure and the classic silo mentality. Lose the silos. Silos emphasise personal goals rather than goals of the organisation. Strategies become fragmented and internalised rather than being part of a bigger picture for the benefit of the end users. Passing off chunks of work from one group to another is not the right way to ...


29

Use dialog, not direction, Use conversations, not coercion Code monkeys are a symptom of a lousy design and development process which emphasizes direction/management versus dialog/collaboration. There are many names for this kind of process (waterfall, linear, directive, etc) but at the heart of it, the code monkey syndrome comes out of a design/development ...


25

It depends on what behavior is being changed Milton Glaser created the following illustration he calls "The Road To Hell", which shows gradients in design ethics: For most cases in The Road to Hell, the design objective is to convince users to buy something. But the illustration shows that the nature of the product and the type of designed ...


22

I could be wrong but I think here the smiley faces are the only rating system. The stars are a filter for 3 star hotels, 4 star hotels, etc.... Which....yes. Isn't immediately obvious at all and is quite confusing. It looks like they are using two separate rating systems. The user experience flaw here I would say is in using pictures and the simple word ...


22

I feel like this question can be answered in 2 ways, regarding asking users in general and your current specific problem/image. Asking users in general Asking the user for an opinion can, in some cases be a good thing. The answers you get however should in most cases be used as a way to see if there is an underlying problem. For instance, a small example. ...


15

In your experiences, what has worked well, and what would you make sure you never done again? Works Well: Be a designer who develops AND a developer who designs. White board concepts and solutions with developers as you either flesh out features or solve technical solutions. Be willing to bend and compromise and stand up for your ideas. Expect the ...


14

One idea: draggable multiple range sliders Instead of 13 checkboxes you could use one slider, on which the user can select multiple ranges and single values. See an example of such a slider here: http://blog.153.io/Elessar/. Your slider would then go from 6 to 18 and instead of having time labels you could show the selected age. When moving the spans you ...


14

Perhaps not so much learning the principles, but understanding the principles of Object Oriented Programming or the equivalent does help with some aspects of UX design. The short answer would be NO (i.e. it is not crucial), but the long answer would be YES because by developing a process that helps you articulate the relationship between different entities ...


11

Maybe something like this could work: Since you have such a small number of options just make them large, press-able buttons which display a checkmark once you tap them. This list obviously scrolls off the screen but I think you get the idea. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


9

Whether it is a 'coding monkey' or a 'pixel monkey' (for graphic/visual designers) dilemma, the problem remains the same. There are essentially two aspects of any role that has some degree of specialization. In the first instance it is about being able to solve problems in your domain area, and the second instance it is about implementing the solution. The ...


9

There are great answers here already. I'd like to provide a slightly different perspective on the topic, which is more process-based. Test driven development From the different strategies for software development, Test Driven Development (TDD) is one of the most popular ones nowadays. It asserts that you should write tests before writing any code. But ...


9

In the original MacOS versions (pre-10), there was a close button in the top left and maximize (if available) in the top right, as shown here: Putting them together seems like a reasonable choice to tidy up the interface. So, perhaps the real question is why was the close button in the top left corner originally? My best guess: Mac users use Command-Q (or ...


8

"If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses." - Henry Ford I understand the dilemma. I do agree with @Jamezrp. We as UX designers/engineers are between the function of the system, business objectives of the firms we consult/work with, and the most importantly the user who is going to use the system to meet his personal goal. ...


8

To be honest with you, this happens way more than UX designers would like to admit. Especially at the start of your career, without a more senior UXer, you won't always be able to persuade the business to let you meet users. You've probably been given some details of what to design on those dashboards, go from there and ask your colleagues why thats needed. ...


7

Back is very specific in mobile applications. You can go back in the browser to the last page visited. On Android you can move back in a stack or to a different stack and in iOS back is tied to the screen you came from, hence it can display its title. Remember that you can go "back" historically, "up" in a hierarchy or left in a series of pages where you can ...


7

Engage developers in UX Developers are smart and generally want to understand why and "because it's in the spec" just creates another reasonable question why is it in the spec? Explaining, defending and gaining respect all help but here are specific activities I have found to create leverage: Let developer see and feel users issues In user tests, ...


7

The job of a UX designer is not to make sure the product makes sense, it's to lead the user to the end goal. For many of us, that's to get the user to buy something or spend money in some way. The question of ethics plays little role there: to drive the business you need revenue, and that comes from a UX that promotes making purchases. That said, it is ...


7

Steve Jobs was fairly inspired by Xerox's Xerox Star, which was the first to introduce a User Interface in their system. Demo video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYvxgNhUwBk Xerox's Xerox Star was poorly marketed, and hence wasn't well known. With the inspiration of the Xerox Star, Apple launched Mac OS 1.0 and placed the Window Commands/Actions to the ...


7

As you already mentioned, even if you might find Wiki entries, the borders of what is included and what not are kind of blurry. I re-ordered the items because of context - this is the consensus that I use for my day-to-day worklife: Use Cases: A feature- or part-of-the-site- usage scenario. If you take use cases for a shopping cart, these would be: 1) Save ...


7

In the article How to Use Centered Alignments: Tips and Examples the following recommendations are suggested : There’s nothing inherently bad about a centered alignment, you just have to know how to properly yield one if you’re going to implement it with any amount of success. The first thing you need to learn is when not to implement a centered ...


6

It might be just a matter of trend. But using dark background for navigation elements, like the left or top sidebars, and light background for the content gives focus on the content. So the contrast differentiates the parts of the site and the light over the dark stands out so it gives focus to the content.


6

"Low fidelity prototype" refers to a prototype i.e sketchy and incomplete. You basically collect data analyze & check the feasibility at the early stage. Whereas "high fidelity prototype" refers to a fully functional prototype wherein you provide click-through interfaces. In simple terms, it's the actual product that will be shipped. You should always ...


6

As someone who works as a designer and knows OOP languages, I think some of the philosophies of OO kinda help with understanding structure, particularly if you're getting into SCSS and modularizing your design to create reusable chunks of content. But that's not really OO, but more understanding of variables and basic programming concepts (like keeping it ...


5

Actually, I would be surprised if the development work isn't pixel perfect. Developers need logic and rules for programming, and if you are not supplying them with a style guide that they can plug into their development framework then I should think they will be asking you a question every five minutes about the spacing or alignment or hex value for the ...


5

You should pay them for the 1.5 hours of work, say "thank you", and then go find another designer with a portfolio that better fits you particular needs and wants. (And 1.5 hours isn't a lot of time to really explore a solution properly--maybe consider allotting a tad more time) I really want a great looking comp not a lot of back and forthing. Keep in ...


5

There are several features you can use, which may be combined if appropriate: Status bar. A status bar in the window can indicate that the process is underway or not. Ideally, the status bar will include a progress bar and/or percent done and/or estimated time remaining. If possible, place the status information in the corner of the window so the user can ...


5

In answer to your question: No you shouldn't assume that you're supposed to avoid modifying user behaviour. That's part of your job...modify it. Also, no it is not against ethical standards to modify user behaviour without being explicit about it. You're hardly going to move a button for example and then put a label on it saying 'We moved this button because ...


5

Painting a row of numbers Imagine you have a row of numbers in boxes, you can click individual boxes to select/deselect them, or you can click and drag to select multiple ages. Click to select ages (click and drag to select multiple ages) | 6| 7| 8| 9|10|11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18|


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