14

Well, as you say, the obvious answer is to randomize (there are other, more sophisticated ways to do this, but probably too much for what you're looking for). If you use the same pool of participants and show 2 versions in a row, there is no way to avoid stimulus exposure biased results. for this, you need to use a technique called Counterbalancing The ...


5

I create user personas mainly using user interviews and contextual inquiries. If available, I will also use data from the analytics software to support my findings during the interviews. The way I translate the research into personas is basically looking for patterns. I interview 25-30 people when I do a new round of user interviews and I look for ...


3

it's great to have teachers thinking about this. Many techniques have been tried in an attempt to promote civility; here are a few: Provide a place where the "rules of the road" are established on a platform or community, so there isn't an "anything goes" feeling Make users accept the "rules of the road" as a condition of ...


3

I'm assuming you are looking to evaluate a design/website, but cannot test it with end-users. First, it will be helpful to define terms. A heuristic review is when you evaluate a design based on a set of general usability guidelines. A Journey Map is a document that articulates the steps a user takes to achieve their goals and the challenges/opportunities ...


2

I think there's something here to be said for not asking 'why' and trying to understand their true rationale deeper. In a workplace context their entire rationale possible is that, and knowing why won't help you to design better for them. What actually helps is starting to understand 'how' they think they can make more money. Is it that they're a trader and ...


2

It is not completely clear to me for whom the solution is made for, is it an internal software used by your company's employees or is it for your clients? If it's an internal software, test it with those employees only. I don't see the point in investing resources to test a solution with people who will not be using it. If it's for your customers, contact ...


2

Interesting question. In usability tests I ran in the past, most users were not familiar with the feature and instead they would get closer to the screen or squint if the font was too small. On the other hand, users for whom accessibility was important were familiar with the feature but they rarely used it because they had their system wide software (...


2

finding research participants is a problem a lot of teams struggle with. If you want to do it yourself or want to talk to your own users it can be really time-consuming to find the right users to talk to and to set up interviews. In my previous teams the process for finding participants has been either: Test things internally (interviewing colleagues). ...


2

Start by thinking about what you want to discover. It sounds like you've already been tasked with improving an lms (whatever that is) and adding features to it. So you'll need to discover what improvements need to be made. I'd start with a Heuristic Evaluation or Cognitive Walkthrough, quick and cheap methods you can do yourself. Then consider a round of ...


2

My first thought would have been to set up two test groups: One starting with A the other starting with B just as you stated in your possible solutions. With the results of both groups combined, we can probably assume, negates the learning effect. I'm also not certain that randomizing the tasks would yield an accurate result (80% starting on A could still ...


2

I don't think there is a publicly available source for this information. It is normally derived from taxonomy research using a card sort methodology (this link explains more about this (please note this is a link to my agencies website. We are UX research experts): https://ux247.com/our-work/services/taxonomy/) Although not designed for the purpose I have ...


2

Within the context that you are referring to when it comes to UX engineering, there are some interesting points to raise when it comes to component prototyping and development, UI architecture, and maintenance. The reason why I bring this point up is because the activities relating to prototyping, UI architecture and maintenance is relevant not only to the ...


2

All the UX design heuristics apply also in Engineering, of course, and are based on the technical requirements of WCAG, but World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published a document that focuses more on the Dev: ACCESSIBILITY HEURISTICS: Heuristic 1: Provide alternative equivalents to make information suitable for auditive, visual, and tactile channels. In that ...


2

The heuristics for UX engineering (UXE) are the same as for UX design (UXD). Both disciplines seek to create a UI with good UX and heuristics tend be rather general. Thus, the same heuristics apply equally to a UI as represented at the wireframe or illustration stage (UXD) as to a UI as coded in prototype or production (UXE). Heuristics As for specific ...


2

Adding to the previous answer, it seems as if your product is missing discovery research. This happens a lot where an organisation builds something with a hypothesis that is unproven and then finds it doesn't fit in to the daily lives of the people it is intended for - however easy to use it is. Discovery research can fix this problem as it identifies unmet ...


1

In addition to the other comments: An existing system might also mean wealth of usage data you have access to. Dig through analytics, search terms, customer service logs, previous marketing studies, talk to customer service reps / help desk people, etc. All this already existing data will give you a head start and paint an initial picture of what people are ...


1

This is a huge "it depends" question. Each type of research method and methodology has its own set of techniques. First, you need to determine the method (for example: quantitative, qualitative, summative), then the methodology to be used (what type of research will you use? It could be a survey, open-ended questions, framed questions, any type of ...


1

I'd suggest observing users. There is always something new that you learn from this. You can ask a few questions towards the end of a session to further understand why they did certain things. This type of qualitative research helps you to understand the space and allows you to write better survey questions for quantitative research. Secondly I would advise ...


1

For incentives, Visa gift cards work well in most places around the world. The amount would be based on how much you'd need to spend to get the right participants in each location to sign up. You might want to start with a lower amount and raise it if you're not getting the right people to complete your screening survey. For language, I would highly ...


1

Hello @nzookie welcome to UX Stack Exchange. I'll reply with the last thing that you'd want to hear, it depends on the context. If it was for a documentation, I'd avoid showing the last bit of the endpoint. You'd have two repeating content sitting close to each other. But on the other hand, if you don't have any title for your product it'd work as a header ...


1

If you cannot pay an external agency or service to do your recruiting, you will need to do the work yourself. Put out screeners on LinkedIn and Twitter. Find the communities that your target audience would most likely be.


1

Well, the answers you will get would be different. I will try to share my view. First of all, the no of users is going to be huge so I would not be able to rely much on qualitative research. I will try to separate the user's group on the basis of their demographic, education details. I will try to circulate the surveys to a large no. of users. that would ...


1

That's a totally legitimate question, and usually I start answering with a "trust your guts" 😁 IMO I would go with a back & forth technique depending on the type of data you already have in your hands. With the data you already got, try to isolate schemes or patterns in term of demo like ages, location, maybe types of devices. Do the same ...


1

The main UX finding to those who produce written content is that users (mostly) don't read all those nicely crafted words. Most times users are 'skimming' text. So text has to be written and formatted to be skimmed.


1

Just sharing my few cents’ worth. I feel that user research roles can come in place to achieve 2 objectives, namely To research on what types of content perform better on your website and why/how they are more popular with your readers To research on ideas and map out a possible future road map for the team to follow Hope this helps!


1

The idea of an open card sort is that you leave the sorting unrestrained. If you start limiting the number of groups you're influencing that process. If you do want to constrain them by providing categories use closed card sorting or a combination. As always it depends on your starting point and hypotheses to test. What is the goal for doing this? If you ...


1

I would say there is still a lot of room for R&D here. Some have tried and may have not succeeded to get the pattern in the hands of the masses for reasons other than it being a competitive approach to gesture input. The Floating Action Button on Android facilitates easy access to actions in the easiest to reach part of the screen. When extended, a range ...


1

Here's the thing: From my experience, if you get too attached to a fixed process and number of steps, you might start to feel frustrated because one of the steps might not fit what you're trying to achieve next and this might even hinder your creativity. It's good to have a process but also a lot of flexibility as to what should you do next to get something ...


1

I usually kick off with around 12-15 users. In terms of what questions to ask really depends on the type of site you are building. For example, user interview questions for an eLearning app could include the following: How they learn a new concept online. What steps do they follow? Describe a typical day at school/work. What makes a good day in their ...


1

A really interesting question. I read it a few times and had a think, one area which I felt worth raising is the assumption in the question that screen time is bad. The reason I phrase it that way is that whether or not screen time is bad, and what usage patterns are classified as addictive is highly subjective. A few examples to illustrate my point. Some ...


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