5

Interview / observe them, understand their behavior, then slowly uncover the commonalities. Use those to start uncovering their roles / groupings. Roles become apparent after the analysis of the data, not prior to interviewing.


3

When you got the inspiration to travel, what media were you using? What information were you consuming? Perhaps a question like this would allow the interviewed to focus on the moment they decided to travel.


3

User interviews are a great way of research, you can use them on multiple occasions in a design process. When can you use them Gather information before you have a design / use them to make artifacts. Use them to fill gaps in other artifacts like persona's. At the end of a user test to have a verbal response related to observations. In your case, I would ...


3

The Interview should be focused around deducting what roles the subjects fit into, rather than predefining it. However, if the is distinction in terms of the roles is important, you could screen the subjects based on multiple screening questions/survey derived from the desired roles you want to account for.


2

A method that works very well for me is looking at the extremes of the personas attributes and form groups where the needs and outcomes seem to divert the most. So for example, in this case, you mention educating a patient before an operation. So one extreme might be, a person that never had any kind of operation and someone who's had more than ten. You ...


2

For the business side, assuming that your company has customers, I would look to your customer support team for recommendations of insightful customers. If you don't have a lot of time you probably want to start with articulate, reflective customers who can introspect and tell you about their needs rather than the ones who think they know what they want and ...


2

If you already got your product set up (e.g. website, app)you can use the following methods chat bot (prompt for user feedback after the user engages) using existing mailing list you can also use the following screens with a banner that leads to a user research sign up page. Confirmation screen 404 page footer of your website If you haven't got anything ...


2

It is not completely clear to me for whom the solution is made for, is it an internal software used by your company's employees or is it for your clients? If it's an internal software, test it with those employees only. I don't see the point in investing resources to test a solution with people who will not be using it. If it's for your customers, contact ...


2

finding research participants is a problem a lot of teams struggle with. If you want to do it yourself or want to talk to your own users it can be really time-consuming to find the right users to talk to and to set up interviews. In my previous teams the process for finding participants has been either: Test things internally (interviewing colleagues). ...


2

In a general sense, I would see that as a closed question, it has a yes/no answer. There's a big difference between me asking you "Can you remember what you had for dinner last Friday" and "What did you have for dinner last Friday?" (crummy example but you get the idea! I would suggest asking a more open version of the question, similar ...


1

Workshops might not be required in this case, but if they're feasible, they're helpful. Bringing together several people who know something about each customer persona, talking through each experience in detail, can supplement what the customer experience research team has identified. One approach you might want to explore is as-is scenario mapping. Prior to ...


1

I usually kick off with around 12-15 users. In terms of what questions to ask really depends on the type of site you are building. For example, user interview questions for an eLearning app could include the following: How they learn a new concept online. What steps do they follow? Describe a typical day at school/work. What makes a good day in their ...


1

Who you recruit needs to be a close match to who the software is for. The first question therefore is "who is the software for?"


1

Depending on what niche you are working in, you can try out reddit. I sent messages to individuals who answered my question on reddit to check if they were interested in being a part of the interview. Slack channels are another way to reach out to potential users. Hope this helps!


1

You have to choose methods that are most appropriate for the business requirements (i.e. products and services), technology and the users (number of users, access to them, demographics, etc.). While there is no method that is one-size-fits all, generally it is considered best to use a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to find out both the ...


1

This is a redesign job (a customer portal) for a big Australian company which I recently worked on. My initial interviews were focused on below three things What the portal does. How it does it. What are necessary and redundant things needed to be redesigned. This will help you get started with overview of the problem/approach the client has on why it ...


1

This largely depends on the aims of your user interview. Also what are the aims or scope of your website redesign. is it an aesthetic facelift or you aim to fix UX issues too? If you want to find and fix UX issues you could gear towards user testing. and give them a task to complete on your major flows and observe how they complete it or struggle. You ...


1

I sometimes use... "Curious, what else?" or "I'll note that, continue?" or "Do you see other items of interest?" or "Great observation!" Each of these is situational, and I use them to both acknowledge the comment and prompt to move forward.


1

That's a great question to ask and I am placed in a similar role at a B2B2C start-up! I had to find answers quickly to move work along for my team. Here are a few things I researched on and the steps I took towards a solution. They worked pretty well for me. These articles were inspiring and helpful in setting the wheels in motion: 5 Tips for Better Design ...


1

You should provide context by giving the user a task that involves them using the features you want to observe. E.g. Imagine this is your first time using the app, what would you do? A task that's framed in the user's context and not too specific. If a participant asks how to use a certain feature (which they tend to do), you can tell them to imagine they ...


1

"Roles" in this case should be taken in the larger sense of group. As Nicolas Hung pointed out, these groups become apparent only after conducting the research, through the analysis. Commonalities are one way to identify them, on the condition that these common points are relevant to the product / service you want to design. In the health tech domain where ...


1

This is a tricky one. Audio Recording: Audio recording is good and discrete, but you are recording only audio. In terms of data, you will have a lack of information in terms of facial and body expressions (reactions). Video Recording: You will collect audio and video, so you'll cover answers and facial and body expressions (reactions). Screen Recording: ...


1

Use task based activities that require the use of the feature you want to test and base your questions around the problem that our feature sets out to solve rather than the feature itself. Lets say your new feature is an email subscription form. You might present you test candidate with a page or prototype and ask them something like "how would you get ...


1

When testing usability, think of which hypothesis you want to validate and which scenarios you have to work with. Based on those, create tasks that will help you measure how well you perform or solve those. Tip, for writing up hypothesis you can think of current problems and or opportunities, for example: Ex. problem: users don't read my articles. ...


1

Does anyone have a tried and tested set-up and method. There's no silver bullet I know of other than to just be prepared. Regardless of what software you use, have a plan focus on what you can control: Send the participant instructions on how to prepare ahead of the call - tell them what link to download, what browser. Hopefully you've done as much ...


1

In most situations, yes. You'll need to measure this in some way, so adding more (or changing) questions will obviously provide different results. However, this doesn't mean it's wrong to do this. Any procedure that helps you get better insights is a good procedure. If you feel like some questions need to be added, then go for it. Just be careful not to mix ...


1

It's always good to update personas to reflect your current target group. The world around your target group is changing and so should your personas. So I would recommend using option 1; Have new interviews with your target group. Learn from the gaps and valuable information from the previous personas and ask the right questions to get that information. If ...


1

First, it's important to understand what your users are like and how they perform the tasks that your app will help them with. At my current company we do shadowing to simply observe users. We watch what software they use to do their work. We pay attention to the printouts on their walls. We notice how often they're interrupted and how frequently they're up ...


1

Hmm, interesting question. Well, I was in a similar position sometimes ago when we were revamping the web portal. Your condition might me different but the time when we were catering that portal then that time it had almost 400 pages and the biggest problem was their navigation system including header, footer, breadcrumbs etc. and also the copies of the ...


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