51

This is not as simple as it may seem, and although your instinct may be to ban someone, you should first consider the following: How do you determine what is offensive or not? There are many surnames (last names or family names) that would be considered swear words in English, let alone some other cultures. So you run the very real risk of banning someone ...


50

Both seem perfectly fine to me but as far as preference goes, I'd say go with the second option. For any questions, please consult our Help Desk – or reply to this email. The reason being that it eradicates confusion. If you write the email address, a lot of people would think it is different from the one you sent and would write a new email to reply. ...


23

It currently accounts for about 20% of the activity on the site. The fact that 20% of the activity on your site is private messaging indicates that your users consider private messaging to be of high value. So, you should be hesitant to remove it. Even if private messaging is not directly of benefit to your community, it still provides increased ...


22

As noted on the Android Design Principles Writing Style page: Friendly Use contractions. Talk directly to the reader. Use “you” to refer to the reader. Keep your tone casual and conversational, but avoid slang. By saying 'Oops' - in English, a commonly accepted way of acknowledging that an unexpected event has happened, in a non-frightening way - we are ...


19

The most common way is to: Ask the user to enter her password before changing e-mail (even if she is currently logged in): this will help to avoid stealing of the account if user has forgotten to logout or somebody simply got user's cookies or something like this. Send an activation link to the new address and don't switch e-mails until the new one will be ...


15

Color naming is an active field of research and has been for decades. See this example of work by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) from 1965. I include this reference only because it shows the length of time people have been thinking about this and that technology keeps making the problem fresh - notice the reference to reproducing the colors in ...


13

I think you are quite safe using the 147 html and css color names to communicate the correct color to users. It should be more than enough, but still colors based on W3C's standard.


10

I agree with Shreyas, the easiest option for users is to directly reply. However, in some cases these options don't need to be mutually exclusive. What if the user has no issues with their account, but something after logging in? (Email contents) Regards, -Website Need help regarding this topic? Reply directly to this email. Need something else? Open a new ...


8

The best course is to provide multiple options to the user. Generally you'll want to provide at minimum, the following three options: Send the notification of activity immediately Send a summary of activity that occurred for a given time period (1 day, 1 week, etc. - the period should reflect the expected user goals for your website) Never send any ...


7

Short answer: No There are users who like obscenity and vulgarism, there are those who don't. Generally those kinds of people don't like to mix, and will always try to segregate into separate groups. If you ban offensive names (which is not that easy from technical standpoint), you remove one of the flags those people use to distinguish themselves. However ...


7

If possible, I would try to completely avoid showing the user the difference between server side and client side filtering. Will your users care where the filtering is done? Unlikely. So don't give them this unnecessary info. Better is to construct you UI in such a way that the first filter is always automaticaly server side then all subsequent filters ...


7

This is something we have been discussing for a little while. On the one hand, pure-text emails (in this day and age) come across as vague and often untrustworthy by most audiences. The look-n-feel of a richtext/html email wins over most of the time. This is basic UI design. Even more so because the corporate identity can be injected into the email and this ...


6

There are two different issues at hand here. The first is whether you a private message system is needed, and the second is whether you can reasonably remove one that already exists. Depending on the site, private messaging can be a huge administration nightmare. People sending spam, privacy concerns if you can read the spam to know when to remove it, etc....


6

Using informal language makes the error message more human and less intimidating. It also makes the blockage for the user less frustrating if it's language they can find humor or familiarity with. It's very much like adding a quirky illustration such as the Twitter 'fail whale' to lighten the situation. Like using "Error" or "Invalid" it is wise to add a ...


5

As others have said, it's an attempt to not scare the users. For example, I know someone who works at a company that writes software for devices that are used in the emergency room. One of the hospitals that uses this company's product has gotten very agitated about the application crashing. Why? In part because the application sometimes shows a message box ...


5

Don't show the review widget The user cannot review the item, so it's not a good idea to waste space and create frustration for users (with disabled controls, etc) when you already know that they cannot review the product. Instead, you can provide a link to explain why users can't review: (click image to expand) If a user wants to leave a review, you are ...


5

The quick and straight forward answer is: just say what you mean. "You currently owe 39.00" It speaks the same language as the user and removes the ambiguity. Small differences in language make a big difference, and can often times mean different things to different people who speak the same language. Perhaps it is a cultural difference in the ...


5

Typically two confirmation emails should be sent: One email should be sent to your old email address ("You asked us to change your email address") which would allow you to revert the change if it wasn't you that did it, or you changed your mind, or you made a typo. One email should be sent to the new email address asking you to authenticate with your ...


4

This is a difficult one. I stumbled across the Wikipedia entry for Holiday Greetings, which provides some interesting historical information on the use of "Happy Holidays" and "Season's Greetings". I hate to generalize, but perhaps look at the countries that your users registered from and try to match the greeting to the predominant religion of the country (...


4

The best solution is for a site to have "safety" levels. By default, content created by users who are identified as offensive is completely hidden from view. You don't see their questions, answers, comments or accounts at all, unless you switch to unsafe mode. When you switch to unsafe mode for the first time, you have to acknowledge a dialog that you're ...


4

XKCD have done an online survey asking users to name 5 million colours (across 222,500 user sessions). If you need to know what a huge sample of internet users think a colour is called, see: http://blog.xkcd.com/2010/05/03/color-survey-results/


4

It depends on the service and your expected user base. Deciding between blocking and allowing potentially offensive usernames is fairly easy. The more difficult decision is where exactly you draw the line. You are making a tradeoff. You are disallowing some users from doing something they'd like to do (use a vulgar/offensive name) in order to create a more ...


3

Short answer: Yes, ban it. Always a good idea to prevent the user from creating such names. There will be some who bypass this and use numbers for letters and stuff, but you should not make it easy for them use it blatantly. Also, depending on the context, it is highly desirable, for example, here on stackexchanges, it shouldn't be that big a deal, but in ...


3

Both previous answers (by Benny Skogberg and user1757436) are good ones but I suggest something specified by a definitive link in the domain of w3c.org. http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-color/#svg-color http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/types.html#ColorKeywords I think w3c.org has enough gravitas for anyone involved in the UX/UI/software design fields and the links will ...


3

Given that you stated that you're going to cater for mostly British folks, you should consider following their laws. I am not a lawyer, but reading Wikipedia's article on the topic you'll need to account for users who use hate speech in their nicknames. This might be a hard requirement for you, something you don't really decide “if”, but “how”.


3

It's all about the users. If you are able to determine that your users are particularly religious, and that they adhere to a particular religion, and your company benefits by also associating with that particular religion, then it's probably fine to leverage a particular religious holiday greeting. But I imagine that's a tall order for most companies ...


3

For consumer websites it's important not to use words (e.g. financial terms) which can be confusing to a broad audience. If you need to communicate a complex concept like an account balance, you can do so simply but also provide some additional explanatory text in case the user needs clarification:


3

I think both are acceptable statements. It all depends on how you want/need the response... one creates a new email while the other is a reply to the current email, which can give you a little history in the customers current issue/problem.


2

A status bar, as per definition of the term, communicates status. This means, by default, reserve it for things that identify the state of the application rather than user actions. Though I can't offer a authoritive source, some things that come to mind: DOs: application status (location, operational status, identifiers, cursor position, selected tool, ...)...


2

You can tweak your UI based on the main action(s) you like the users to take. When breaking up the contents (error items + success items) based on the options available for each one, in your case students see a list of not qualified and qualified courses with options below each one, it makes it hard to get an overview of what actions are available on this ...


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