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Product strategy is the basis of the life cycle of your product and the basis on which the plan for all future work is based. It allows UX designers to decide which audience should focus on, as well as focus on the characteristics of the consumer and the product itself. Many companies, for example, https://mindy-support.com - decide to use machine learning. ...


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If you are unsure about the organization of the (mega) menu, a card sorting exercise could be fit. Or just do the card sorting with those items you are more unsure about. For the layout of the menu, I would set up a series of quick tests to understand if the user can "read" the menu: First level navigation Second level navigation Additional info you provide ...


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You could check Google search volumes for those phrases. It is also perfect case for easy A/B test. Most precise would be "Short URL", as "link" is broader term, and "tiny" is not only related to length. But to test is the best. :)


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You could do an information retrieval task. By that I mean select a few items from the mega menu for the users to find and you could record time, error rate, etc. You could do that as part of a larger task (like the simple scenario that the previous poster mentioned).


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You can test both aspects separately. Use a tree test for the information architecture Use simple scenario within usability testing to test the interaction of the menu I don't see anything more to this than a combination of those two aspects.


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The role of the test user is defined by the objective for doing the user testing (as this can vary depending on the stage of your product/service and the resources available), so there is definitely no hard and fast rule. However, it is important to have a defined objective to avoid issues with inconsistency of how the testing is performed (if this is ...


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