77

The historical reason is that that's what the spacebar does in more, the lowest common demoninator (and probably oldest) of text pagers. In more, it makes sense to map the largest key on the keyboard to the most common action: show the next page. In the glory days of more, you couldn't count on mouse scrollwheels, page down buttons, or sometimes even arrow ...


47

Short answer You can't design for them. It can be that your design is bad, or that people really cannot concentrate on the task due to their internal reasons, explained below in the long version. If you have successfully determined that it is the second case, nothing in your design can change how people tick internally. An easier to use application will ...


42

I would consider two things here: Visual connection to action Common standard implementation To the first point - visual connection: If you see an arrow that points up, you expect something to happen in that direction. You will automatically look up, not down. So every action that goes to a different direction will feel alien, detached. So this argument ...


39

A button should show what will happen when it is next clicked - not point to something else. When the button above a closed menu is clicked, the content will drop down - so the should point down (to where the content will appear) When the button above an open menu is clicked, the content will move up into the button - so the arrow should point up.


31

The spacebar is the largest key of your keyboard, and is consequently the easiest one to interact with. For that reason, apps tend to use the spacebar for: a simple action: where no input, precision or direction is involved. a repeated action: the spacebar is the easiest to press several times in a row. a "forgivable" action: if you accidentally press it, ...


26

Is your question "Should we go ahead and ship the product with a 17% failure rate?" If so, and if you're sure there are no weird extenuating circumstances that compromised the integrity of the test itself, here are the factors I would weigh: What does the task failure mean for the user? Is the nature of the task such that a slight inconvenience -- and maybe ...


25

Arrows pointing in our reading direction (right or down) point forwards. Buttons should indicate what happens when clicked. The arrow on a dropdown button should point right or down as it indicates new content will be visible once clicked. Once the dropdown has been opened, clicking the button again should close it. Therefore the arrow should point upwards ...


21

I would say it has to do with the following reasons : Contrast : Studies have shown that black or dark backgrounds provide the easiest contrast and can allow users to read discrete information quickly without having to make an effort to discern details when in a dark environment (which is often the environment in cars) Darkness adaptive : Another reason is ...


21

I don't have any evidence that this is the reason the spacebar is used for page down, but back in the day when IBM was setting PC design standards (that still heavily influence the design today), the original IBM AT 84-key keyboard from 1981 (IIRC) did not have page up/down or dedicated arrow keys (they shared the number pad): The standard 101-key keyboard ...


15

I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


14

There are some differences yes, and I have witnessed them myself. Using high fidelity mock-ups makes users think that the system they are using is fully functioning. That makes them think that system is not working properly and they rate usability to be less good. Rudd, Stern and Isensee wrote on their article Low vs. high-fidelity prototyping debate: When ...


11

From a pure source code perspective, "why" may be hard to answer. In the latest WebKit, there is no commentary (neither the GTK implementation nor the EFL one): case VK_SPACE: granularity = WebCore::ScrollByPage; if (keyEvent.shiftKey()) direction = WebCore::ScrollUp; else direction = WebCore::ScrollDown; break; Rewind the ...


10

Luke W (our beloved guru of anything form related) has a bit of info from 2010: http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1007 Personally, I really dislike forms laid out this way. They feel much more like legal forms than 'friendly'. But there does seem to be some research that justifies them. UPDATE: However, do note that 'voice' that your example is using ...


10

Since you're asking about the direction of the arrow, you might like to check out the Microsoft standards for glyphs and arrows. Scroll down from here, to the table that lists the different types of arrows and glyphs. It says things such as this: Chevrons point in the direction where the action will occur, to show the future state. Arrows point in the ...


9

From a user (non-programmer's) perspective. There's a difference between creating something and editing (updating) something. It's probably better to show this difference in button labels. This may be a stylistic thing, but if there's room for a longer label, I tend to use "Create Item" as oppose to "Create" so the action is crystal clear. This also makes ...


8

This is a huge question and cannot be answered in a simple answer but here are some recommendations based upon personal experience and what has worked best for me Stakeholders generally dont have time to go through sheaf's and sheaf's of data. Hence talk to them to find out what is the most important detail they want (taking your example in the comments, ...


8

It's not answerable without UX goals Start by ordering your UX goals with the form. Rank the following: Minimize UX friction / maximize convenience - Favors buttons since (a) the interaction is one-click; and (b) buttons are easier to use than checkboxes; Ensure that the terms and conditions are read - Favors checkbox because they create more friction/...


7

Most usability tests are not science. They are there to inform your design process and hunt for bugs. If that sixth user had not had a problem your test would have failed, not succeeded (as you seem to think). You are not testing whether your application is user-friendly, the premise of a usability test is that it isn't, and you want to find out why. The ...


7

Leo, here's the way I approach it usually. In the research phase you're talking about I collect a list of competitors and add their information to a notebook for the project in Evernote. Then I have a single area that allows me to have multiple screenshots, my own notes, and anything else that might pertain, quick design ideas etc. I usually have a ...


7

The documented barriers I found deal mainly with an expected error rate of 1 in 3 words that the agent misinterpreted, and the need to manually correct those errors in order to move on. Although speech input is 3x faster than typing, this error rate leads to frustration and eventual abandonment of speech input. Source: Kumar, Paek and Lee's "Voice Typing: ...


7

As others have mentioned, this is very much a safety issue and very much worth asking! Fortunately, user experience in vehicles has a long history of study and standardization. SAE International, formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers, has published a number of standards and papers related to this issue. Here are some that may be relevant: http://...


7

My rule of thumb is that I expect about 1/3 of participants to not show up (this doesn't count people who need to reschedule). Occasionally you get lucky and everyone shows up, occasionally you get unlucky and have a horrible no-show rate. There are some items that impact my 1/3 no-show rule-of-thumb: The more difficult that the group of participants is ...


6

A method which worked for one of my colleagues the last time was to show a brief demo of the product you are showcasing while talking about the benefits it offers. After doing that, he would causally mention that they would love some additional inputs on what users are really looking for and if the person would be interested in walking through a quick ...


6

Perhaps it simply means that you should focus on being a UX researcher instead of a UX designer. There are generally fewer roles for researchers than designers, but there are still opportunities for those of us who love UX research, and who understand design but aren't designers. Personally, I've been a UX researcher for 12 years. I'm definitely not a ...


6

Hectic, fast and instant. Everything has to be an instant success. People have a range of personalities and some people work like this. On one occasion I got someone behaving like this when testing a computer game and I decided to just junk the testing script and use the time to have a chat about why they felt this way about the game they were supposed ...


6

https://www.nngroup.com/ is the site you are looking for.


5

The best study that I am aware of was by Geert Hofstede on cross-cultural analysis, where he compared individual cultures and perceptions across thousands of professionals around the world. The result was that there were clear cultural differences between countries. But the most interesting thing was that the differences within countries were greater than ...


5

Depending on how large your organization is and whether or not your building has a central gathering area, like a cafeteria, there is one method I've found very valuable in gathering quick and cheap usability data. Only test one simple thing (like the placement of a control on a page) Create a simple task which should take no more than 5-10 seconds to ...


5

ACM Digital Library (dl.acm.org) is really helpful when doing focused literature review. For more general research you can access Google Scholar search engine. I also recommend a great tool called Mendeley, that keeps track of your research and uploads all your material to the cloud (also generates the citations...) There are a number of papers on ...


5

Don't mind the mad paint skillz but I recommend something like the image below. The logic: You are asking for two addresses which are highly likely to contain the same data so those should be near each other. When requesting them to fill in either of the addresses just make sure that the textboxes are within their respective Shipping or Billing columns. ...


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