30

Step size and security When they are well designed, they seem to prevent more incidents than what they cause. There's a lot of information in Pauls, Jake. "Relating stair nosing projection, tread run dimension, shoe geometry, descent biomechanics, user expectations, overstepping missteps, and closed-riser heel scuff missteps.". I've not found studies that ...


16

I've not done this before, but I am going to answer my own question because after reading each of the answers here, I found that I needed to dig deeper to find a definitive answer. Nosings offer multiple usability benefits The world's foremost expert on stair design seems to be John Templer, formerly Regents' Professor of Architecture at the Georgia ...


15

I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


11

I am afraid my answer might not be considered as the definitive source as I am just quoting someone in a forum but the primary reason is to enable users to walk down steps better by providing more grip and space. To quote the post. For safety in going down the stairs. When you step down the stairs, you place the ball and toes of your foot on the tread ...


8

It's not answerable without UX goals Start by ordering your UX goals with the form. Rank the following: Minimize UX friction / maximize convenience - Favors buttons since (a) the interaction is one-click; and (b) buttons are easier to use than checkboxes; Ensure that the terms and conditions are read - Favors checkbox because they create more friction/...


6

A success rate is one of many metrics used for measuring/quantifying usability. As http://www.measuringusability.com/blog/essential-metrics.php describes, if a task can not be completed, the product is not usable. "If users cannot accomplish their goals, not much else matters." The methods used for determine success rate will vary greatly depending upon: ...


6

Perhaps it simply means that you should focus on being a UX researcher instead of a UX designer. There are generally fewer roles for researchers than designers, but there are still opportunities for those of us who love UX research, and who understand design but aren't designers. Personally, I've been a UX researcher for 12 years. I'm definitely not a ...


6

I don't see any disconnect at all between the two. Most people will have a faster response to objects on the right side of their visual field. So that applies to moving balls; tigers that want to eat you; etc. It is about a tiny increase in visual perception. This has nothing to do with learned importance. Reading from left to right has taught us that ...


6

This is conjecture as well but consider this analysis of stair climbing gait, specifically the transition from stage IV (Forward Continuance) → V (Foot Clearance) → VI (Foot Placement): In particular, note that while lifting the leading foot, the knee flexes more than the hip, thus causing the toes to have a net backwards movement. If you think ...


5

Depending on how large your organization is and whether or not your building has a central gathering area, like a cafeteria, there is one method I've found very valuable in gathering quick and cheap usability data. Only test one simple thing (like the placement of a control on a page) Create a simple task which should take no more than 5-10 seconds to ...


4

Where to Start? As the comment above asked, how do you know there are usability issues? Why is a redesign necessary? Are there new requirements or are the old ones not being met? Is there any data/user feedback at all to suggest known problems or desired new features that you can start with? Is there any existing customer feedback mechanism (if not are ...


4

At my last job we used Jira to keep track of our projects. Each of the phases you described above can be implemented in this tool and it's very usable, efficient and effective. Project managers and scrum masters create the high level features and tasks for each requirement (also called epics and stories). The tasks or stories then are given high level ...


3

If you need a lot of different unique codes it matters whether the user will have to manually type it in, and it will have to be generated algorithmicly. Typed in Manually For something they'll have to type in, and still sufficiently random, I've done this before by generating a string like GHJ5-JKG4. Start by picking a random number between 0 and 31. (A-...


3

I would say No, not entirely. There is of course the System Usability Scale which measures: effectiveness (can users successfully achieve their objectives) efficiency (how much effort and resource is expended in achieving those objectives) satisfaction (was the experience satisfactory) The measurement coming closest to your question would be ...


3

There are many UX designers/developers that come from a visual design and programming background, and they don't have much interest or idea bout usability research and testing. Do you think that they should be the one's driving UX design and decisions? One of the biggest problem I see with UX design these days is the obsession and focus on the user ...


3

You need to set your business goals and based on that you can set you ways to measure the success. Think about an e-commerce site, or think about a social network. The goals of the business will be completely different, i.e. % abandoned baskets, conversion, etc. Tools like Google analytics help to make sure you are able to constantly monitor the site and ...


3

In short: usability requirements are the mean to reach appropriate usability attributes for concrete system. Usability Attributes are some features, which are represent more abstract Usability concept. Usability has multiple components and is traditionally associated with these five usability attributes: • Learnability: The system should be ...


3

Twitter is still a delivered medium like sms or email. It makes no sense to offer an edit option because people will have already received the original tweet. UI has to follow the fundamental nature of the system. Even the delete option is only offered on the basis that it is fallible and clients might not respect it.


3

FYI, the overhang is called nosing. Stair nose is used to create a decorative finished edge on a stairstep or staircase The primary reason is aesthetics and cost savings--not UX. Like a door or window casing, the stair nosing covers the seam between two materials meeting--in this case the tread and the riser. While it may cost more in materials, it's ...


3

Test in Context First, I understand your explanation of the difference between having the choice to use software and not having the choice, but I don't really see how that's going to affect your testing. A user is either using the app to complete a task, or they're not, and you can't really control for all the reasons they might not be using it. Sure, in a ...


3

Consider yourself lucky to get such a challenge! I had a stint of time when I was designing mainframe applications - it was quite a shock to have to go from graphics to text-based interfaces, but it forces you as a designer to really focus on the core aspects of design. A few things I've found useful in CLIs: Easy way to access help for commands, ...


3

Under what circumstances would you NOT want a clean, sleek and minimalist website design? Both questions have one target at the end and that is the Users. It highly depends on they type of users of your website and their willingness to change. Here are two good examples: A) Wikipedia: It is a highly content oriented website and the design is almost the ...


3

I am totally blind. I can read with a braille display for 8_12 or more hours at a time even more. I learned braille when I was 3 years old. Braille to me, is like reading and writing print or cursive, for people who can see... It is just another alphabet that is all. Uncontracted braille that is where all words are spelled out can take as little as 2 to 3 ...


3

Assuming that the data that you are collecting for the number of clicks is meaningful and directly related to a small change you are measuring (which is probably what you should be using the A/B test for), I imagine that you would want to set up a comparison to show that there is a significant difference (i.e. significance testing) in the number of clicks ...


2

Your biggest challenge will likely be finding a steady stream of participants. If you are testing for internal products, you can try this: 1) Talk to HR, and make usability testing be part of onboarding for new hires. This will give you a fresh unbiased view 2) If you are testing minor functionality, grab anyone nearby for 5-10 minutes who isn't on your ...


2

At a recent UX conference I came across a talk dealing with User Research in Agile environment. Two methodologies are discussed in the talk: RITE and Krug. Some highlights: 'A morning a sprint, that's all we ask.' In every sprint, test 3 users (first morning of the sprint) Invite people to come and watch: Owners, developers, designers, writers, ...


2

You can have several levels of "success rate", but in essence it's a matter of saying "yes" or "no" to this question: "Did the user accomplich the task?" Quote from the book, p65: To measure task success, each task [...] must have a clear end-state. It's similar to "effectiveness" in the ISO 9241-11 definition...


2

Find some representative users and 'test' it on them (watch them using your tasks on your site) - you'll learn a lot.


2

Let’s say you need a million codes tops. We’ll use a friendly scheme that has a milliard/billion possible combinations, but could be scaled up easily, so not every possible combination yielded a valid coupon code. Get a list of 1000 short and frequent non-vulgar words, preferably from the same category, e.g. just nouns. Randomize their order. Assign to each ...


2

I think you'll find that different people will have different opinions about this, so while this is probably just my opinion, I will try to explain it in the most objective way I can think of. When you approach design from an 'engineering' perspective, it is about providing a solution to a problem that comes from first principles. That is, you come up with ...


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