63

You want your users to use your service. Your users want to use the service but they need to invest first (i.e. time to upgrade their browser). Ideas: First of all be nice and show an empathic message, e.g. like Apple does if you run a browser that's not supported by iCloud Tell them why it's worth investing the time (list benefits, preview what they can ...


59

Updated Answer - March 2013 Since this answer was posted on November 2012, Google has discontinued this plugin. While it might still work as of today (March, 2014) there is no guarantee of it working in the future. As of January 2014, support for Chrome Frame is discontinued: http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2013/06/chrome-frame-discontinued.html Given ...


41

Allow the user to see how many are selected, and give them the option to select the whole data set beyond the pagination. Gmail has this pattern. Once you select 'All' via the checkbox, a message appears stating: How many are currently selected A link with the number of the whole data set, and the ability to select the entire set


40

You might want to briefly try explaining the value of upgrading, while promoting the action with positive language, and demoting the negative action with not exactly negative language, but just less positive. You also need to provide information for those who are unable to upgrade (for example corporate restrictions may prevent use of anything except IE6), ...


30

You could do what this GIANT Austrailian company did and charge an extra "tax" for old browsers in compensation for having to support them Kogan.com 'It appears you or your system administrator has been in a coma for over 5 years and you are still using IE7.' It begins, before going on to break the news about the costs. 'To help make the internet a ...


13

Add a button to the bottom where the other page controls are. Also, if users are doing mass changes often, consider making a separate tool for it.


11

Proper feedback is one of the most important parts of creating good, intuitive UX. Leaving it be would provide very little feedback and may cause confusion among your users. From my experience in UX testing, the majority of users don't retain the information presented on many "one time" notifications, so its likely that this won't be the most successful ...


10

I definitely wouldn't phrase it as Versions are an artifact of development since in this age of having real source control, a version number that includes a source control ID is critically important for debugging any customer issue. The importance of marketing a version number really depends on the revenue model of the product. For products that are one-...


10

If you are willing to trust Adobe's self reporting, they have their own statistics on market penetration of Flash versions. A little math on these numbers would give you numbers on how often users upgrade. For example, they released 10.1 in June, and by December (6 months) they had 87% penetration in the US. In May they released 10.3, and they claim 40% ...


8

Philosophical background For the user, the system is the user interface. This is actually the programmers' definition of an interface. You can change every other part as you wish, as long as the interface stays the same the users won't notice. As soon, as you change the user interface however, you affect users' life. DA01 is right on that for data-heavy ...


7

Redirect them to the scaled-up mobile-version of the website and display a heading on top, saying they can use the full-version when they decide to upgrade their browser. I think this is better than outright refusing to serve them as bounce-rate when met with a "brick-wall" (upgrade your browser to proceed) will be far higher. Scaled-up, mobile web-sites ...


7

How are you warning your users before the point of sale? Some text along the lines of "Your current browser is not fully compatible for use with this site. To get the maximum productivity/effectiveness, one of these browsers is recommended" is the easiest/most common tactic, sounds like what you're doing. There are a number of javascript-based overlays that ...


6

Personally I like being in control of things and dislike more or less anything happening outside of my control, such as a page refresh or new item listings. At least I as a user needs to get the impression that I'm in control. Talking to my team they are of the same opinion as me. So implementation of SE notification of new activity and Twitters new tweet ...


5

Chrome does this pretty well; it quietly shows a little up arrow icon over the "menu" icon (oddly I couldn't find an image of this). When you click the "update" icon it lets you know you should restart Chrome to let it update. If you naturally close Chrome at any point it will (very quietly and quickly) update. Since updates generally aren't so important ...


5

There is another concept I've seen somewhere, I can't remember where but I'll try to dig up a reference. The concept is to define this length of time by their previous actions. i.e. if it is the first time they have dismissed the update tell them again the next time they boot up/log in, however if they have dismissed it multiple times you don't want to keep ...


5

How does your site work with a text only browser? How does it appear to people using screen readers? If your response is that it doesn't work, you may be in contravention of disabilities legislation in your jurisdiction. When pushing the technological boundaries, you have a number of issues to deal with including this. Even for user who are capable of ...


5

I would recommend the following steps to ensure a painless (or relatively painless) process of keeping your users informed about a site outage : Determine the user base of your site and determine the time of minimum usage : I am hoping you have some sort of Analytics built in which shows what your users and where they are originating from and what time they ...


5

The easy way If you're the one sending round the update notices each time, by far the simplest way to do it is to add a nice big 'Troubleshooting' section. The first thing you put in that goes: Why haven't I got the update? A: Try pressing F5 to refresh the page. However, there's not a 100% guarantee that users look at that, so you may also want to ...


5

A lot of sites (this one included) simply notify the user that there are updates and provide a shortcut to load just the new data. This allows the user to proceed as they wish, in one of two ways: If what the user is doing is not critical, then he/she can continue working without interruption If the user is very concerned about having the most up-to-date ...


4

Personally, I do the same as Matt Rockwell. I let it nag until i'm reminded and i have a free moment. I would suggest placing some kind of banner or other notification suggesting users upgrade their flash player within your application. We have upgraded our application. To experience all of the new functionality, we suggest you update your Flash player ...


4

I'd have to answer: yes in theory, but in practice, no. Due to corporate firewalls preventing automatic updates, old but still supported versions of Windows Server still used in enterprises and general user reluctance to accept updates the concept of version numbers is still very much with us. It could be turned around too - what about the tech-savvy ...


4

I like the way it was done in Mac OS X with just two options available: "Install" and "Not now". Choosing the "Not now" option will postpone update for some time (users were able to configure the delay in System Settings, AFAIR), pressing "Install" will install immediately. So, your solution is almost the same, except two last items, which, I think, is ...


4

Don't refresh without user interaction Section 6.7. of the W3C's Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (published 5-May-1999 already, mind you) states: Ensure user control of time-sensitive content changes. Ensure that moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating objects or pages may be paused or stopped. Back in the day, that mostly meant not ...


4

The label "refreshes every Z seconds" is a "dead" one, that doesn't convey the feeling the system is online and working. You can try instead add a countdown timer, that will show the time until the next refresh. This way, the user would know exactly when the next refresh is going to be, but still will have a feeling that the system would do it (you see the ...


4

Here, the 'Edit', as you stated, only applies to modifying the name of the 'Instance'. As the 'Edit' action is really 'Rename instance', I would call it this (or just 'Rename') explicitly and make 'Delete' a separate action. I have not had success with placing 'Delete' under an 'Edit' entry point; I have observed it to be the last place users look. Its a bit ...


4

Place an "Update results" button, on top of the result list, so the user is aware that there might be newer results and he is the one who decides to update them. About your options: Confirm dialog. This can be "disturbing" if the user just wanted to check the old result list. Search again. I'm not sure if this is meant as the update button I was commenting ...


3

The Superior Efficiency of UNIX Apps UNIX UIs have a tradition of favoring user efficiency over learnability. For example, UNIX’s designers ask, “Why type “rename” when you can more quickly type “mv” instead? Who cares if that’s harder to memorize?” I expect the UNIX versions of the apps do in fact allow users to do whip off the tasks with remarkably little ...


3

One thing to ask is if you can do any part of the process for them? BJ Frogg gave his family envelopes with his address already written on them and asked his family to write him while he was away at school. Just completing part of the process motivated them to start mailing him frequently. Additionally, constrain your users from subscribing to the service ...


3

Answering a question with a question: Will your site work at all (as in provide any sort of value) with browsers that don't have full support for the HTML5 features you use? If so, show users placeholder panels for content they're missing. This is both "carrot" and "stick"; they know they're not getting the full experience and value of what they're paying ...


3

From our company practice, it's best to do it at the time of least visitors. There has to be a block segment of time that you have the least number of users. And something under 25 visitors. And at a time that if your website is not running, you're not gonna get people who feel upset by it. Examples would be 2am on Friday night (ie. early saturday morning) ...


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